Place:Octon, East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Watchers
NameOcton
Alt namesOchetonsource: Domesday Book (1985) p 308
TypeHamlet
Coordinates54.101°N 0.423°W
Located inEast Riding of Yorkshire, England
Also located inYorkshire, England    
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Octon is a hamlet, and shrunken medieval village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Octon is recorded in the 11th century Domesday book as Ocheton. The village contained a chapel dedicated to St. Michael (noted in 1327). After around 1400 no records exist relating to the chapel, and the village is thought likely to have been depopulated as a result of the Black Death.

By the 19th century the village was reduced to a small farming hamlet. In 1823 three farmers and a gamekeeper were recorded as resident in Octon, the extent of the hamlet remained unexpanded throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

The modern village is at the same location as the reduced medieval village; earthworks of the medieval church and village were scheduled as an ancient monument in 1994. The 'Old farmhouse' at Glebe farm, Octon, a cruck framed longhouse dating from the 17th century is a Grade II* listed building.

Research Tips


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Octon, East Riding of Yorkshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.