Place:Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England

Watchers
NameNuneaton
TypeParish (ancient), Civil parish, Urban district, Borough (municipal)
Coordinates52.523°N 1.468°W
Located inWarwickshire, England
See alsoHemlingford Hundred, Warwickshire, Englandhundred in which it was located
Nuneaton and Bedworth District, Warwickshire, Englandnon-metropolitan district covering the area since 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Nuneaton is the largest town in the Borough of Nuneaton and Bedworth and in the English county of Warwickshire. The population of Nuneaton's eleven wards in 2011 was 81,877.

Nuneaton is most famous for its associations with the 19th century author George Eliot, who was born on a farm on the Arbury Estate just outside Nuneaton in 1819 and lived in the town for much of her early life. In her novel Scenes of Clerical Life (1858), "Milby" is the thinly disguised market town of Nuneaton.

The Nuneaton Built-up area is a conurbation based around Nuneaton and several surrounding villages, including Hartshill and Bulkington, and had a population of 92,968 according to the 2011 census. This is significantly down on the 2001 census population of 132,236 the decrease occurring mainly because Hinckley no longer forms part of the built-up area.

A Vision of Britain through Time provides the following description of Nuneaton from John Bartholomew's Gazetteer of the British Isles of 1887:

"Nuneaton, market town and par. with ry. sta., Warwickshire, on Coventry Canal, 9 miles N. of Coventry, 19½ miles SW. of Leicester, and 97 miles NW. of London, 6,112 acres, population: 8,465; [post office], [telegraph office], 2 Banks, 3 newspapers. Market-day, Saturday.
"Nuneaton is said to have derived its name from a nunnery founded about the middle of the 12th century, portions of which still remain.
"Ribbons were formerly a staple mfr. here, but the trade has declined, and a large industry now exists in the preparation of woven worsted goods. There are also factories for cotton, elastic, &C., while wool and skin dressing, iron working, edge-tool making, and malting are active industries; and brick fields, coal mines, and ironstone mines are in the neighbourhood. Nuneaton has an endowed grammar school founded in the time of Edward VI., and an endowed free school founded in 1712."

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Nuneaton's name came from a 12th-century Benedictine nunnery (parts of which still survive) around which much of the town grew. Prior to this it was a settlement known as 'Etone', which translates literally as 'water-town'. Nuneaton was listed in the Domesday Book as a small hamlet. A market was established in 1233 (and is still held today). The first recorded use of the modern name was in 1247 when a document recorded it as 'Nonne Eton'. The Nunnery fell into disrepair after 1539 (with Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries). King Edward VI School was established by a royal charter in 1552. From 1944 it became a grammar school for boys and, although it was locally known as KEGS, it never included the word "grammar" in its name. In 1974 it became a sixth form college. Other grammar schools in Nuneaton during the 1944 to 1974 period were Nuneaton High School for Girls and Manor Park. Additionally Nicholas Chamberlaine School in Bedworth was an early comprehensive school that had a grammar school stream.

Nuneaton grew gradually from the 17th century onwards, due to its position at the centre of the Warwickshire coalfields. At the time of the first national census in 1801 Nuneaton was already one of the largest towns in Warwickshire, with a population of 5,000. During the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, Nuneaton developed a large textile industry. Other industries which developed in the town included brick and tile making and brewing. By 1901 the population of Nuneaton had grown to 25,000.[1]

Nuneaton became an urban district in 1894, and was upgraded to the status of a municipal borough in 1907.

Due largely to munitions factories located in Nuneaton, the town suffered heavy bombing damage during World War II. The heaviest bombing raid on Nuneaton took place on 17 May 1941, when 100 people were killed, 380 houses were destroyed, and over 10,000 damaged, a few smaller raids took place on the town, most notably on 25 June 1942. As a result of the bombing, much of the town centre was rebuilt in the post-war years.

On 6 June 1975, six people died and 38 were injured when a train crashed just south of Nuneaton railway station.

Research Tips

  • The website British History Online provides seven volumes of the Victoria County History Series on Warwickshire. The first (Vol 2) covers the religious houses of the county; Volumes 3 through 6 provide articles the settlements in each of the hundreds in turn, and Volumes 7 and 8 deal with Birmingham and Coventry respectively.
  • GENUKI main page for Warwickshire provides information on various topics covering the whole of the county, and also a link to a list of parishes. Under each parish there is a list of the settlements within it and brief description of each. This is a list of pre-1834 ancient or ecclesiastical parishes but there are suggestions as to how to find parishes set up since then. GENUKI provides references to other organizations who hold genealogical information for the local area. There is no guarantee that the website has been kept up to date and therefore the reader should check additional sources if possible.
  • Warwickshire and West Midland family history societies are listed in GENUKI.
  • The FamilyTree Wiki has a series of pages similar to those provided by GENUKI which may have been prepared at a later date and from more recent data. The wiki has a link to English Jurisdictions 1851. There is a list of all the parishes in existence at that date with maps indicating their boundaries. The website is very useful for finding the ecclesiastical individual parishes within large cities and towns.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time, Warwickshire, section "Units and Statistics" leads to analyses of population and organization of the county from about 1800 through 1974. There are pages available for all civil parishes, municipal boroughs and other administrative divisions. Descriptions provided are usually based on a gazetteer of 1870-72 which often provides brief notes on the economic basis of the settlement and significant occurences through its history.
  • The two maps below indicate the boundaries between parishes, etc., but for a more detailed view of a specific area try a map from this selection. The oldest series are very clear at the third magnification offered. Comparing the map details with the GENUKI details for the same area is well worthwhile.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Nuneaton. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.