Place:Mali

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NameMali
Alt namesFrench Sudansource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984) p 717
French West Africasource: Family History Library Catalog
Malísource: Cassell's Spanish Dictionary (1978) p 868
Republic of Malisource: Wikipedia
République du Malisource: Britannica Book of the Year (1993) p 663
République du Malisource: Wikipedia
Soudan françaissource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984) p 717
Sudanese Republicsource: Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984) p 717
TypeNation
Coordinates17°N 4°W
Contained Places
Capital district
Bamako
Deserted town
Taghaza
General region
Azawad
Inland Niger Delta
Historic region
Wassoulou
Inhabited place
Banani
Region
Gao
Kayes
Kidal
Koulikoro
Mopti
Sikasso
Ségou
Tombouctou ( 1977 - )
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Mali , officially the Republic of Mali, is a landlocked country in West Africa. Mali is bordered by Algeria to the north, Niger to the east, Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire to the south, Guinea to the south-west, and Senegal and Mauritania to the west. Its size is just over with a population of 14.5 million. Its capital is Bamako.

Mali consists of eight regions and its borders on the north reach deep into the middle of the Sahara, while the country's southern part, where the majority of inhabitants live, features the Niger and Sénégal rivers. The country's economic structure centers on agriculture and fishing. Some of Mali's prominent natural resources include gold, being the third largest producer of gold in the African continent, and salt. About half the population lives below the international poverty line of US$1.25 a day.

Present-day Mali was once part of three West African empires that controlled trans-Saharan trade: the Ghana Empire, the Mali Empire (for which Mali is named), and the Songhai Empire. During its golden age, there was a flourishing of mathematics, astronomy, literature, and art. At its peak in 1300, Mali covered an area about twice the size of modern-day France, and stretched to the west coast of Africa. In the late 19th century, during the Scramble for Africa, France seized control of Mali, making it a part of French Sudan. French Sudan (then known as the Sudanese Republic) joined with Senegal in 1959, achieving independence in 1960 as the Mali Federation. Shortly thereafter, following Senegal's withdrawal from the federation, the Sudanese Republic declared itself the independent Republic of Mali. After a long period of one-party rule, a 1991 coup led to the writing of a new constitution and the establishment of Mali as a democratic, multi-party state.

In January 2012, an armed conflict broke out in northern Mali, which Tuareg rebels took control by April and declared the secession of a new state, Azawad. The conflict was complicated by a military coup that took place in March and later fighting between Tuareg and Islamist rebels. In response to Islamist territorial gains, the French military launched Opération Serval in January 2013. A month later, Malian and French forces recaptured most of the north. Presidential elections have been scheduled for 7 July and legislative elections for 21 July.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Mali. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.