Place:Lytton, British Columbia, Canada

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NameLytton
TypeCommunity
Coordinates50.2°N 121.567°W
Located inBritish Columbia, Canada
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Lytton in British Columbia, Canada, sits at the confluence of the Thompson River and Fraser River on the east side of the Fraser. The location has been inhabited by the Nlaka'pamux people for over 10,000 years, and is one of the earliest locations settled by non-natives in the Southern Interior of British Columbia, having been founded during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush of 1858–59, when it was originally known as "The Forks". The community includes both the Village of Lytton and the surrounding Indian Reserves of the Lytton Indian Band, whose name for the community is Camchin, also spelled Kumsheen ("river meeting").

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Lytton was on the route of the Gold Rush in 1858. That same year, Lytton was named for Edward Bulwer-Lytton, the British Colonial Secretary and a novelist. For many years Lytton was a stop on major transportation routes, namely, the River Trail from 1858, Cariboo Wagon Road in 1862, the Canadian Pacific Railway in the 1880s, the Cariboo Highway in the 1920s, and the Trans Canada Highway in the 1950s. However, it has become much less important since the construction of the Coquihalla Highway in 1987 which uses a more direct route to the BC Interior.

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