Place:Lunéville, Lunéville, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France

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NameLunéville
Alt namesLundstadtsource: Family History Library Catalog
Lunévillesource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Lunévillesource: Wikipedia
TypeCommune
Coordinates48.583°N 6.5°E
Located inLunéville, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Lunéville ( ; German: ) is a commune in the Meurthe-et-Moselle department in France.

It is a subprefecture of the department and lies on the Meurthe River at its confluence with the Vezouze.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Lunéville was a renowned resort in the 18th century, known as the capital of Lorraine. The grand Château de Lunéville, built in 1702 for Leopold, Duke of Lorraine to replace an older palace, was the residence of the duke of Lorraine until the duchy was annexed by France in 1766. The chateau was designed in the style of Versailles to satisfy Leopold's wife, Élisabeth Charlotte d'Orléans, the niece of Louis XIV, and became known as the "Versailles of Lorraine". It includes a chapel designed by Germain Boffrand. Leopold and his wife were the parents of Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine and Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor (through him they were the grandparents of Marie Antoinette).

The last duke of Lorraine was Stanisław Leszczyński, the former king of Poland. A devout catholic, author, and philanthropist, Stanislas had a church built and several follies in his gardens for the amusement and education of visiting Polish nobility and followers of the Enlightenment. The more famous visitors to his court were Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, André Morellet, and Montesquieu. After the death of his father-in-law in 1766, Louis XV of France annexed the duchy and turned the castle into a barracks, but much of the original construction has survived, and what remains is open to the public and the chateau's intricate parterre gardens, designed by Yves Hours (a pupil of André Le Nôtre) in 1711 and Louis de Nesle in 1724, are a public park today.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Lunéville. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.