Place:Grassington, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

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NameGrassington
Alt namesChersintonesource: Domesday Book (1985) p 316
Ghersintonesource: Domesday Book (1985) p 316
TypeTown or village, Civil parish
Coordinates54.068°N 1.999°W
Located inWest Riding of Yorkshire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inNorth Yorkshire, England     (1974 - )
Yorkshire, England    
See alsoSkipton Rural, West Riding of Yorkshire, Englandrural district of which it was a part 1894-1974
Craven, North Yorkshire, Englandmunicipal district of which it has been a part since 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Grassington is a market town and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town is situated in Wharfedale around from Bolton Abbey and is surrounded by limestone scenery. Nearby villages include Linton, Threshfield, Hebden, Conistone and Kilnsey.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The Domesday Book lists Grassington as part of the estate of Gamal Barn including 7 carucates of ploughland (840 acres/350ha) including Grassington, Linton and Threshfield. The Norman conquest of England made it part of the lands of Gilbert Tison. But by 1118 Tison had suffered a demotion and his lands returned to the king then given to Lord Percy

Grassington was historically a township in the parish of Linton in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It became a separate civil parish in 1866, and was transferred to North Yorkshire in 1974.

Although often described by local people as a village, Grassington was granted a Royal Charter for a market and fair in 1282 giving it market town status. The market was held regularly until about 1860. A change in land use from the early 17th century, when lead mining began to assume more importance, brought some prosperity, but Grassington's heyday arrived during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The opening of the Yorkshire Dales Railway to Threshfield in 1901 brought new visitors, many of whom settled, some finding work in Skipton or in the developing limestone quarries. The Old Hall at Grassington is reputedly the oldest house in Yorkshire, dating from the late 13th or early 14th century.

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