Place:Gordon, Georgia, United States

Watchers
NameGordon
Alt namesGordonsource: Getty Vocabulary Program
TypeCounty
Coordinates34.5°N 84.867°W
Located inGeorgia, United States     (1850 - )
See alsoBartow, Georgia, United StatesParent county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Gordon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 55,186. The county seat is Calhoun.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Gordon County was created on February 13, 1850 by an act of the Georgia General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1849-50, p. 124). The new county was formed from portions of Cass (later renamed Bartow) and Floyd counties. All lands that would become Gordon County were originally occupied by the Cherokee Indians -- and, in fact, the area was home of New Echota, the last seat of the Cherokee Nation. Even while Cherokees remained on their homeland, the General Assembly enacted legislation in December 1830 that provided for surveying the Cherokee Nation in Georgia and dividing it into sections, districts, and land lots. Subsequently, the legislature identified this entire area as "Cherokee County" (even though it never functioned as a county). An act of December 3, 1832 divided the Cherokee lands into ten new counties—Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cherokee, Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union. Cherokee lands were distributed to whites in a land lottery, but the legislature temporarily prohibited whites from taking possession of lots on which Cherokees still lived.

It was not until December 29, 1835 that Georgia had an official basis for claiming the unceded Cherokee lands that included the future location of Gordon County. In the Treaty of New Echota, a faction of the Cherokees agreed to give up all Cherokee claims to land in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina and move west in return for $5 million. Though a majority of Cherokees opposed the treaty and refused to leave, the U.S. and Georgia considered it binding. In 1838, U.S. Army troops rounded up the last of 15,000 Cherokees in Georgia and forced them to march west in what came to be known as the "Trail of Tears", making Gordon County the head of this loathsome trail.

Gordon County's original 1850 boundaries were changed numerous times between 1852 to 1877, during which time the legislature transferred portions of Cass (Bartow), Floyd, Murray, Pickens, and Walker counties to Gordon County, while transferring land from Gordon to Floyd and Murray counties.

Georgia's 94th county was named for William Washington Gordon (1796–1842), the first Georgian to graduate from West Point and first president of the Central of Georgia Railroad.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1850 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1850 Court records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1850 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1850 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1856 Probate records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1860 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1864 Marriage records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1850 5,984
1860 10,146
1870 9,268
1880 11,171
1890 12,758
1900 14,119
1910 15,861
1920 17,736
1930 16,846
1940 18,445
1950 18,922
1960 19,228
1970 23,570
1980 30,070
1990 35,072

Research Tips

External links

www.rootsweb.com/~gagordon/


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Gordon County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.