Place:East Farndon, Northamptonshire, England

Watchers


NameEast Farndon
TypeVillage
Located inNorthamptonshire, England
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

East Farndon is a small linear village and civil parish about one mile south of Market Harborough in the Daventry district of Northamptonshire, England. The village is close to the border with Leicestershire, and has a Leicestershire post code and telephone dialling code. At the time of the 2001 census, the parish's population was 258 people.

The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086. In a field on the west side of the parish is the 'Judith Stone'. This is a glacial erratic, brought from probably hundreds of miles away during an ice age. It is thought to take its name from the Countess Judith, niece of William the Conqueror. She is recorded in the Domesday Book as holding land in the parish, so perhaps the stone marked a boundary of some kind.

The church stands at the top of a hill and the village street runs down the hill quite steeply from there towards the town of Market Harborough. The church dates mainly from the 13th and 14th centuries and has a fine tower which can be seen for some miles around.

King Charles's army came through the village and occupied the ridge to the south of the church before its defeat at the nearby village of Naseby in 1645.

Research Tips


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at East Farndon. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.