Place:Dumfriesshire, Scotland

Watchers
NameDumfriesshire
Alt namesSiorrachd Dhùn Phrissource: Wikipedia
TypeTraditional county
Coordinates55.2°N 3.48°W
Located inScotland     ( - 1975)
See alsoDumfries and Galloway Region, Scotlandadministrative region 1975-1996
Dumfries and Galloway, ScotlandCouncil Area since 1996
Contained Places
Former parish
Bridekirk ( - 1975 )
Carruthers ( - 1609 )
Dalgarnock ( - 1697 )
Sibbaldbie ( - 1609 )
Hamlet
Boreland ( - 1975 )
Cleughbrae ( - 1975 )
Gasstown ( - 1975 )
Racks ( - 1975 )
Historical district
Annandale ( - 1975 )
Nithsdale ( - 1975 )
Inhabited place
Ae ( 1926 - 1975 )
Annan (town) ( - 1975 )
Beattock ( - 1975 )
Bridekirk ( - 1975 )
Canonbie (village) ( - 1975 )
Carronbridge ( - 1975 )
Collin ( - 1975 )
Craigielands ( - 1975 )
Dumfries (town) ( - 1975 )
Eaglesfield ( - 1975 )
Eastriggs ( 1916 - 1975 )
Ecclefechan ( - 1975 )
Gretna Green ( - 1975 )
Hightae ( - 1975 )
Langholm (village) ( - 1975 )
Locharbriggs ( - 1975 )
Lochmaben (town) ( - 1975 )
Lockerbie ( - 1975 )
Millhousebridge ( - 1975 )
Moffat (town) ( - 1975 )
Moniaive ( - 1975 )
Penpont (village) ( - 1975 )
Sanquhar (town) ( - 1975 )
Thornhill ( - 1975 )
Wanlockhead ( - 1975 )
Locality
Conheath ( - 1975 )
Davington ( - 1975 )
Heathhall ( - 1975 )
Maxwelton ( - 1975 )
Parish
Annan ( 1632 - 1975 )
Applegarth ( - 1975 )
Caerlaverock ( 1749 - 1975 )
Canonbie ( 1693 - 1975 )
Closeburn ( 1718 - 1975 )
Cummertrees ( 1733 - 1975 )
Dalton ( 1723 - 1975 )
Dornock ( 1773 - 1975 )
Dryfesdale ( 1732 - 1975 )
Dumfries ( 1605 - 1975 )
Dunscore ( 1777 - 1975 )
Durisdeer ( 1771 - 1975 )
Eskdalemuir ( 1724 - 1975 )
Ewes ( 1700 - 1975 )
Glencairn ( 1693 - 1975 )
Gretna ( - 1975 )
Half-Morton ( - 1975 )
Hoddom ( - 1975 )
Holywood ( 1687 - 1975 )
Hutton and Corrie ( 1745 - 1975 )
Johnstone ( 1734 - 1975 )
Keir ( 1721 - 1975 )
Kirkconnel ( - 1975 )
Kirkmahoe ( 1720 - 1975 )
Kirkmichael ( 1727 - 1975 )
Kirkpatrick-Fleming ( - 1975 )
Kirkpatrick-Juxta ( - 1975 )
Langholm ( 1668 - 1975 )
Lochmaben ( 1741 - 1975 )
Middlebie ( 1744 - 1975 )
Moffat ( 1709 - 1975 )
Morton ( 1692 - 1975 )
Mouswald ( - 1975 )
Penpont ( 1728 - 1975 )
Ruthwell ( 1723 - 1975 )
Sanquhar ( 1693 - 1975 )
St. Mungo ( 1700 - 1975 )
Tinwald ( 1789 - 1975 )
Torthorwald ( 1694 - 1975 )
Tundergarth ( 1791 - 1975 )
Tynron ( 1742 - 1975 )
Wamphray ( 1709 - 1975 )
Westerkirk ( 1693 - 1975 )
source: Family History Library Catalog

The code for the parishes is alphabetical. The number for the individual parish will be found on its parish page. There is also a parish code list below.

Dumfriesshire, or the County of Dumfries (Siorrachd Dhùn Phris in Gaelic), was a traditional county of Scotland until 1975. Its county town was Dumfries. Its western border was with Kirkcudbrightshire; northwest was Ayrshire; to the north was Lanarkshire, Peeblesshire and Selkirkshire; and to the east was Roxburghshire. To the south was the coast of the Solway Firth and the border with England.

Following the 1975 reorganisation of local government in Scotland when the country was divided into regions, Dumfriesshire joined with Kirkcudbrightshire and Wigtownshire, the two counties to the west, to form a single region named the Dumfries and Galloway Region, with four districts within it.

In the early 1990s it was decided that the two-layer form of government was not appropriate and in many parts of Scotland the regional boundaries were redrawn and the sections renamed to form a series of unitary authorities. This reorganization did not occur in Dumfries and Galloway, however. In 1996 the word region was dropped from its title and the area became the Dumfries and Galloway Council Area.

Since WeRelate deals with events that are most likely to have taken place prior to 1975, we retain the use of the three counties. Old Parish Registers, censuses, and civil registration entries before 1975 refer to the three counties and their parishes. To alter these to the modern region and council area names would only cause confusion.

Contents

Geographic Summary

Dumfriesshire had an area of 1063 sq. miles (2753km2). The county town was Dumfries, and other notable settlements included Annan, Langholm, Lockerbie, Moffat, Moniaive, Sanquhar and Thornhill. Its principal rivers were the Nith, Annan and Esk, all flowing south through significant valleys which served as gateway routes into Scotland. (Source:The Gazetteer for Scotland}

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article Dumfriesshire.

Research Tips

Sources for Old Parish Registers Records, Vital Records and Censuses

  • Scotland's People This is a pay website providing vital statistics and census data for all of Scotland with original images. There is a description at Scotland under Genealogical Resources.

Notes for Dumfriesshire

  • GENUKI has a list of references for Dumfriesshire. Some of these may be superseded by more modern material.
  • The FreeCen Project has transcriptions of the whole of Dumfriesshire online for the 1841 through 1871 censuses inclusive.
  • The National Library of Scotland have a website devoted to maps from the 1600s right up to the present. Comparisons of modern-day and old maps of the same place can be made. From the home page click on "Find by place" and then follow the instructions on the next page. Once you are viewing the place you want, use the slider <----> at the top of the map to compare the layout of roads and the place names of smaller areas, perhaps even farms, with the landscape today. The website takes some getting used to. The One-inch 2nd edition, Scotland, 1898-1904 OS is a series of maps with the parishes delineated. Each of these maps cover an area of 18 x 24 miles and will zoom to comfortable reading size with a couple of mouse clicks on the map itself. Unfortunately, they are not geo-referenced, and it is necessary to go to the OS One Inch 1885-1900 series to locate places by latitude and longitude.
  • The Statistical Accounts for Scotland In the 1790s and again in the 1830s, the ministers of the all the parishes of the Church of Scotland were asked to provide a description of their parish to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. The original account request included 160 questions to be answered. These accounts are available in print in 20 volumes and are also online where it is freely available to browse. The browsing portal is below the viewing area of most computer screens. Scroll down to "For non-subscribers" and click on "Browse scanned pages". This brings you to another page on which one can enter the name of the parish in which you are interested.
  • Excerpts from The Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland: A Survey of Scottish Topography, Statistical, Biographical and Historical, edited by Francis H. Groome and originally published in parts by Thomas C. Jack, Grange Publishing Works, Edinburgh between 1882 and 1885 are provided by Scottish Places. Selections from Groome and other gazetteers from the 19th century are also found on GENUKI.


Parish Codes List

1 Annan 12 Dunscore 23 Keir 34 Mouswald
2 Applegarth and Sibbaldbie 13 Durrisdeer 24 Kirkconnel 35 Penpont
3 Brydekirk 14 Eskdalemuir 25 Kirkmahoe 36 Ruthwell
4 Canonbie 15 Ewes 26 Kirkmichael 37 St. Mungo
5 Caerlaverock 16 Glencairn 27 Kirkpatrick Fleming 38 Sanquhar
6 Closeburn 17 Graitney (or Gretna) 28 Kirkpatrick Juxta 39 Tinwald
7 Cummertrees 18 Halfmorton 29 Langholm (formerly Staplegorton) 40 Torthorwald
8 Dalton 19 Hoddam 30 Lochmaben 41 Tundergarth
9 Dornock 20 Holywood 31 Middlebie 42 Tynron
10 Dryfesdale 21 Hutton (and Corrie) 32 Moffat 43 Wamphray
11 Dumfries 22 Johnstone 33 Morton 44 Westerkirk
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Dumfriesshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.