Place:Cumberland, England

Watchers
NameCumberland
Alt namesCULsource: Chapman County Code (GENUKI)
TypeHistoric county, Administrative county
Located inEngland     ( - 1974)
See alsoCumbria, Englandmodern county into which Cumberland merged in 1974|
Contained Places
Borough
Carlisle ( - 1974 )
Diocese
Diocese of Carlisle
District municipality
Allerdale ( - 1974 )
Inhabited place
Abbeytown
Aikton
Ainstable
Allonby
Alston
Aspatria
Bassenthwaite
Bewcastle
Bootle
Borrowdale
Bowness-on-Windermere
Burgh by Sands
Buttermere
Caldewgate ( - 1974 )
Carlisle ( - 1974 )
Cleator Moor
Cockermouth
Croglin
Dacre
Distington
Egremont
Flimby
Frizington
Gosforth
Great Clifton
Great Salkeld
Greystoke
Harrington
Haverigg
Ivegill
Keswick
Kirkbride
Kirklinton
Kirkoswald
Lanercost
Longtown
Maryport
Melmerby
Millom
Moresby
Nenthead
Newton Arlosh
Parton
Plumpton-Wall
Ravenglass
Scotby
Seascale
Seaton
Silloth
Skelton
St Bees
Stanwix
Tallentire
Threlkeld
Thursby
Torpenhow ( - 1974 )
Uldale
Wasdale Head
Westward
Whicham
Whitehaven ( - 1973 )
Wigton
Workington
Parish
Dearham
Unknown
Addingham
Allhallows
Arlecdon
Armathwaite
Arthuret
Askerton
Bampton-Kirk
Beaumont
Beckermet-St. Bridget
Beckermet-St. John
Beckfoot
Bellbank
Berrier and Murrah
Bewaldeth and Snittlegarth
Birker and Austhwaite
Blackford
Blencogo
Blennerhasset and Kirkland
Blindbothel
Blindcrake
Bolton
Bothel and Threapland
Bowness
Bowscale
Brackenthwaite
Braithwaite
Brampton
Brayton
Bridekirk
Bridgefoot
Brigham
Brocklebank
Bromfield
Burtholme
Caldbeck
Camerton
Carlatton
Castle-Carrock
Castle-Sowerby
Castlerigg St. John's and Wythburn
Catterlin
Cleator
Cloffocks
Corney
Crosby-upon-Eden
Cross-Canonby
Crosthwaite
Culgaith
Cumbersdale
Cumrew
Cumwhitton
Dalston
Dean
Dovenby
Drigg
Dundraw and Kelsick
Eaglesfield Abbey
Eaglesfield
Easby
Edenhall
Ellenborough and Ewanrigg
Embleton
Ennerdale
Eskdale and Wasdale
Eskdale
Farlam
Faugh and Fenton
Gamblesby
Garrigill
Geltsdale Forest
Gilcrux
Gilsland
Glassonby
Grange
Graysouthen
Great Broughton
Great Orton
Greta-Mills and Briery-Cottages
Greystone
Grinsdale
Haile
Hayton and Mealo
Hayton
Hensingham
Hesket-Newmarket
Hesket-in-the-Forest
Hethersgill
Holborn-Hill
Holme-Cultram
Holme-East-Waver
Holme-Eden
Holme-St. Cuthbert
Holme-St. Paul
Houghton
Hunsonby and Winskel
Hutton-John
Hutton-Roof
Hutton-Soil
Hutton-in-the-Forest
Ireby
Irthington
Irton
Isell Old Park
Isell
Johnby
Kingmoor
Kingwater
Kinniside
Kirk-Andrews-Middle-Quarter
Kirk-Andrews-Moat-Quarter
Kirk-Andrews-Nether-Quarter
Kirk-Andrews-upon-Eden
Kirk-Andrews-upon-Esk
Kirkland
Kirklinton Middle
Lamplugh
Langrigg and Mealrigg
Langwathby
Laversdale
Lazonby
Linstock
Little Blencow
Little Broughton
Little Clifton
Little Salkeld
Lorton
Low Holme
Lowes-Water
Lowside Quarter
Matterdale
Maughenby
Melthwaite
Middlesceugh-with-Braithwaite
Midgeholm
Mockerkin
Moorhouse
Mosedale
Mosser
Motherby and Gill
Muncaster
Mungrisdale
Naworth
Nether Wasdale
Nether-Denton
Netherhall
Newbiggin
Newlands
Newton-Regny
Newtown
Nichol-Forest
Orton
Oughterside and Allerby
Oulton
Ousby
Over Denton
Papcastle
Pardshaw
Parkhead
Penrith
Penruddock
Plumbland
Ponsonby
Portingscale
Preston-Quarter
Raughton-Head
Renwick
Ribton
Rickergate
Rockcliff
Rosley
Rottington
Salter and Eskat
Sandwith
Santon
Scaleby
Sebergham
Setmurthy
Siddick
Skiddaw
Skirwith
Solport
Sosgill
Soulby
St. Bridget-Beckermet
St. John's-in-the-Vale
St. John-Beckermet
Staffield
Stainburn
Stapleton
Stoneraise
Sunderland
Talkin
Thornthwaite
Thwaites
Trough
Tynehead
Ulpha
Underskiddaw
Upper Denton
Upperby
Waberthwaite
Walton
Warwick
Waterhead
Watermillock
Waverton
Weddiker
West Linton
West Newton
West Seaton
Westfield
Wetheral
Whinfell
Whitbeck
Whitehaven
Whitrigg
Winscales
Woodside
Woodside-Quarter
Wreay
Wythburn
Wythop

Cumberland is one of the historic counties of England that existed from the 12th century until it was abolished for administrative purposes in 1974, with its territory merging with the neighbouring county of Westmorland and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire to form the modern administrative county of Cumbria.

Contents

Early History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The first record of the term "Cumberland" appears in 945, when the Anglo Saxon Chronicle recorded that the area was ceded to Malcolm I of Scotland by King Edmund of England. At the time of the Domesday Book in 1086 most of the future county remained part of Scotland although some villages in the ancient district of Millom, which were the possessions of the Earl of Northumbria, were included in the Yorkshire section with the Furness region.

In 1092 King William Rufus of England invaded the Carlisle district, settling it with colonists. He created an Earldom of Carlisle, and granted the territory to Ranulf Meschyn. In 1133 Carlisle was made the see of a new diocese, identical with the area of the earldom. However, on the death of King Henry I in 1135, the area was regained by Scotland's King David I. He was able to consolidate his power and made Carlisle one of his chief seats of government, while England descended into a lengthy civil war. In 1157 Henry II of England resumed possession of the area from Malcolm IV of Scotland, and formed two new counties from the former earldom: Westmorland and "Carliol". The silver-mining area of Alston, previously associated with the Liberty of Durham, was also added to the new county of Carliol for financial reasons. By 1177 the county of Carliol was known as Cumberland. The border between England and Scotland was made permanent by the Treaty of York in 1237.

Further Social and Economic History

The Wikipedia article Cumbria provides more information on the history of Cumberland (and Westmorland) from the 12th to the 20th century.

Internal Boundaries and Subdivisions

The Wikipedia article Cumberland includes

  • a discussion of boundaries and subdivisions used from the 12th century until the 19th
  • local government changes in the 19th century, including poor law and municipal reform (1830s), local boards and sanitary districts (1848 and 1875), and the local government acts of 1888 and 1894 (see also Cumberland County Council)
  • reform of government in the 20th century, ending with discussion of the 1974 act which merged Cumberland with Westmorland and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire. (see also Cumbria where there are maps of the county)

Research Tips


source: Family History Library Catalog
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Cumberland. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.