Place:Coos, New Hampshire, United States

Watchers
NameCoos
Alt namesCoossource: Getty Vocabulary Program
Coös Countysource: Wikipedia
TypeCounty
Coordinates44.633°N 71.317°W
Located inNew Hampshire, United States     (1803 - )
See alsoGrafton, New Hampshire, United StatesParent county (source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990)
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Coös County (with two syllables), usually spelled Coos County, is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire, including the whole of the state's northern panhandle. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,055, the least of any New Hampshire county. The county seat is Lancaster. The two-syllable pronunciation is sometimes indicated with a dieresis, notably in the Lancaster-based weekly newspaper The Coös County Democrat and on some county-owned vehicles.

Major industries include forestry and tourism, with the once-dominant paper-making industry in sharp decline. The county straddles two of the state's tourism regions. The southernmost portion of the county is part of the White Mountains Region and is home to Mount Washington. The remainder of the county is known as the Great North Woods Region.

Coös County is part of the Berlin, NH–VT Micropolitan Statistical Area. It is the only New Hampshire county on the Canada-United States border, south of the province of Quebec, and thus is home to New Hampshire's only international port of entry, the Pittsburg-Chartierville Border Crossing.

Contents

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Coös County was separated from the northern part of Grafton County, New Hampshire and organized at Berlin December 24, 1803, although the county seat was later moved to Lancaster, with an additional shire town at Colebrook. The name Coös derives from the Algonquian word meaning "small pines".

During the American Revolutionary War two units of troops of the Continental ArmyBedel's Regiment and Whitcomb's Rangers — were raised from the settlers of Coös. From the Treaty of Paris of 1783 until 1835 the boundaries in the northern tip of the county (and New Hampshire itself) were disputed with Lower Canada (which was soon to become part of the Province of Canada), and for some years residents of the area formed the independent Republic of Indian Stream.

In the 1810 census there were 3,991 residents, and by 1870 there were nearly 15,000, at which point the entire county was valued at just under $USD 5 million, with farm productivity per acre comparing favorably with that of contemporary Illinois. Other early industries included forestry and manufacturing, using 4,450 water horsepower in 1870.

Timeline

Date Event Source
1803 Birth records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1803 County formed Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources
1810 First census Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1860 No significant boundary changes after this year Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
1887 Land records recorded Source:Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources

Population History

source: Source:Population of States and Counties of the United States: 1790-1990
Census Year Population
1810 3,991
1820 5,549
1830 8,388
1840 9,849
1850 11,853
1860 13,161
1870 14,932
1880 18,580
1890 23,211
1900 29,468
1910 30,753
1920 36,093
1930 38,959
1940 39,274
1950 35,932
1960 37,140
1970 34,291
1980 35,147
1990 34,828

Research Tips

External links

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/


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