Place:Chigwell, Essex, England

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NameChigwell
Alt namesCingheuuellasource: Domesday Book (1985) p 101
TypeTown, Urban district
Coordinates51.617°N 0.083°E
Located inEssex, England
See alsoEpping Rural, Essex, Englandrural district of which it was part 1894-1933
Epping Forest (district), Essex, Englanddistrict municipality covering the area since 1974
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Chigwell has been since 1974 a civil parish and town in the Epping Forest District of Essex. It is located 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Charing Cross (a point in central London from which distances are commonly measured). The population, according to an estimate of 2006, was 12,500.

Chigwell civil parish was part of Epping Rural District from 1894 to 1933, with local government split between Chigwell Parish Council, Epping Rural District Council and Essex County Council. Following a county review order in 1933, Chigwell formed together with Buckhurst Hill and Loughton the Chigwell Urban District, with the Chigwell Urban District Council replacing both the parish and rural district councils. When Greater London was created in 1965 a small, more densely populated section to the southeast was transferred to the London Borough of Redbridge; this area is now known as the Manford estate. The rest of Chigwell Urban District was incorporated into the Epping Forest District in 1974. Parish councils were re-established for Chigwell and Loughton, and for the first time in Buckhurst Hill, in 1996.

Economic development

the following text is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Traditionally a rural farming community, but now largely suburban, Chigwell was mentioned in the Domesday Book and later lauded by Charles Dickens in the novel Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of 'Eighty; the Maypole Inn is based on the King's Head inn, though the name was taken from the Maypole public house in Chigwell Row; and it is likely Dickens visited both hostelries. Charles Dickens frequently visited Chigwell, which he described in a letter as "the greatest place in the world...Such a delicious old inn opposite the church...such beautiful forest scenery...such an out of the way rural place!".

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Chigwell. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
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