Place:Chantilly, Fairfax (county), Virginia, United States

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NameChantilly
TypeCensus-designated place
Coordinates38.875°N 77.402°W
Located inFairfax (county), Virginia, United States
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Chantilly is an unincorporated community located in western Fairfax County of Northern Virginia. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place (CDP), the community population was 23,039 as of the 2010 census—down from 41,041 in 2000, due to the splitting off of parts of it to form new CDP's including Greenbriar and Fair Lakes. It is named after an early 19th-century mansion and farm.

Chantilly is part of the Washington metropolitan area and is approximately 24 miles (39 km) from Washington, D.C.

Chantilly is home to Washington Dulles International Airport, which serves Washington, D.C. It is also the location of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center annex of the National Air and Space Museum and the headquarters of the National Reconnaissance Office.

Chantilly was also home to the annual Bilderberg summit in 2008 and 2012.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Chantilly was home to a number of colonial plantations in the 1700s, including "Sully," built by Richard Bland Lee I, George Richard Lee Turberville's "Leeton," and the John Hutchison Farm. Chantilly plantation was built on Leeton property prior to the Civil War. Cornelia Lee Turberville, who was born at Leeton and was the daughter of George Richard Lee Turberville & Henrietta Lee of Leeton, was given a portion of Leeton in 1817 when she married her cousin Charles Calvert Stuart. She named her plantation after her grandfather's plantation in Westmoreland County, VA - Richard Henry Lee - Signer of the Declaration of Independence. Chantilly plantation was burned down during the War by the Federal Troops in Feb 1863. The town retained the name of Chantilly.[15]

Growth of the village predominantly occurred during the 19th century, particularly following the construction of Little River Turnpike (Route 236) to Winchester.

The evolution of the Chantilly area into an outer suburb of Washington, D.C., gained momentum after 1980, as developers built residential subdivisions and commercial areas, filling in the farm land south of Dulles Airport. Chantilly does not have a concentrated downtown district; the Fair Oaks / Fair Lakes retail cluster spread out along I-66 provides a loose focus for retail and public activities.

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