Place:Castlerock, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland

Watchers


NameCastlerock
TypeTown
Located inCounty Londonderry, Northern Ireland


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Castlerock (Irish: Carraig Ceasail) is a seaside village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It is situated five miles west of Coleraine, and is very popular with summer tourists, having numerous apartment blocks and three caravan sites. Castlerock Golf Club has both 9 and 18-hole links courses bounded by the beach, the River Bann and the Belfast to Derry railway line. The village had a recorded population of 1,326 people in the 2001 Census, and currently has a popular local football team called Villagers FC.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Local historical interest is concentrated on the 18th century Bishop of Derry's ruined palace, the Mussenden Temple on the clifftop, and the Black Glen set within the Downhill Estate, which is now owned by the National Trust. The palace and estate were created by Frederick Hervey, 4th Earl of Bristol who was the Bishop of Derry in the 1780s. The Mussenden Temple, with its precarious perch on the basalt cliff edge is one of the most photographed scenes in Ireland.

The 17th century Hezlett House is a thatched cottage with a cruck structure and is situated at the crossroads near the village. Built around 1691, it was originally a rectory or farmhouse. Also at the adjacent crossroads is an ancient tree.

The bodies of the two victims of infamous dentist Colin Howell were found in Castlerock on May 19, 1991.

Castlerock was relatively untouched by the Troubles, with only one fatal incident occurring in or near the village as part of the conflict. The "Castlerock killings" took place in March 1993, when four men were shot dead by a group calling itself "Ulster Freedom Fighters", a covername used by the Ulster Defence Association (UDA). One of the men convicted for the murders was Coleraine loyalist Torrens Knight.

Castlerock is also home to Guysmere Summer Camp, which is owned and run by the Presbyterian Church.

Research Tips


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Castlerock. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.