Place:Winterbourne, Gloucestershire, England

Watchers
NameWinterbourne
Alt namesWintrebornesource: Domesday Book (1985) p 115
TypeTown, Civil parish
Coordinates51.5244°N 2.5045°W
Located inGloucestershire, England     ( - 1974)
Also located inAvon, England     (1974 - 1996)
Gloucestershire, England     (1996 - )
See alsoLangley and Swineshead (hundred), Gloucestershire, Englandhundred in which the parish was located
Barton Regis Rural, Gloucestershire, Englandrural district of which it was part 1894-1904
Chipping Sodbury Rural, Gloucestershire, Englandrural district of which it was part 1904-1935
Sodbury Rural, Gloucestershire, Englandrural district of which it was part 1935-1974
South Gloucestershire, Gloucestershire, Englandunitary authority of which it has been a part since 1996
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Winterbourne is a large village and civil parish since 1974 in the district of South Gloucestershire, England. The village had a population of 8,623 in the 2001 census. The Civil Parish of Winterbourne is centred on the village but also encompasses the neighbouring communities of Winterbourne Down, Hambrook and Frenchay. (These communities have all been redirected here in WeRelate, but there is an article on Hambrook in Wikipedia and Frenchay is described below.) To the north-east is the village and parish of Frampton Cotterell and to the west lies the new town of Bradley Stoke.

Contents

Winterbourne

Much of Winterbourne is located on a hill. The village is partially surrounded by woodlands and fields, most with public access, but urban development has greatly reduced these areas. The River Frome snakes its way through a scenic valley from Frampton Cotterell (north-east of Winterbourne) and on towards Frenchay. The Bradley Brook flows from Bradley Stoke and Stoke Gifford to the west and joins the Frome near Winterbourne. Since the 1960s the M4 motorway has bypassed the village to the south and west.

The Parish Church is St Michael's, a building believed to date from the 12th century and which celebrated its 800th anniversary in 1998. Set away from the bustle of modern Winterbourne, St Michael's now sits amidst green fields and attractive cottages with its distinctive spire visible for miles around. It is believed that the original village of Winterbourne was located here. Winterbourne Court Farm Barn is close to St Michael's Church. This is a grade II* listed 14th century tithe barn – an outstanding example of its type.

Watley's End

As well as being the centre of an extensive civil parish, Winterbourne contains the hamlet of Watley's End, nestled on the border between Winterbourne and Frampton Cotterell. Nowadays, it is regarded as an area of Winterbourne, but a few decades ago (and still by a number of older residents) it was considered to be a separate village. People with a sense of identity in Watley's End refer to the busy, uphill part of the village as 'Winterbourne Hill'. Salem, the local Methodist church, is in Watley's End.

Frenchay

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Frenchay is a village, now a suburb of Bristol, England, to the north east of the city, but located mainly in South Gloucestershire and the Civil Parish of Winterbourne. The village is situated between the B4058 road, which runs parallel to the M32 motorway, and the wooded River Frome valley.

Frenchay was first recorded in 1257 as Fromscawe and later as Fromeshaw, meaning "the wood on the Frome". Frenchay's largest place of worship is the Anglican church of John the Baptist, adjacent to the large village common, which is overlooked by period houses. Also overlooking the common is the village school which dates from 1842. The village also contains a Catholic church, a Quaker Meeting House and a Unitarian chapel. W G Grace (1848-1915), the famous Victorian cricketer, whose family lived in the next village, was captain of the village cricket team and played on the common. Frenchay Cricket club is the local club now.

Frenchay is also home to Frenchay Hospital, greatly expanded during World War II for the US Army, which treated wounded soldiers returning from the D-Day landings in Normandy. Frenchay is still one of Bristol's major hospitals, and is famous for its burns unit.

Frenchay's earliest place of worship was the Quaker Meeting House. The present one dates from 1809, and it replaced an earlier one of 1670.

Many Quaker merchants from nearby Bristol made their homes here, including Joseph Storrs Fry (1767-1835), the Quaker chocolate manufacturer, who styled his company J S Fry & Sons. He moved to Grove House (now Riverwood House) in 1800. He died in 1835 and is buried in the burying ground behind the Meeting House along with his wife and daughter, Pricilla.

Frenchay Park, an adjacent suburb, is situated within Bristol city limits.

Registration Districts

Research Tips

  • Bristol Archives is where paper and microfilm copies of all records for Bristol and its environs are stored.

Online sources which may also be helpful:

  • GENUKI gives pointers to other archive sources as well as providing some details on each parish in the county. The emphasis here is on ecclesiastical parishes (useful before 1837). The GENUKI page for the parish will confirm which archive provider has its records.
  • A listing of all the Registration Districts in England and Wales since their introduction in 1837 and tables of the parishes that were part of each district and the time period covered with detailed notes on changes of parish name, mergers, etc. Do respect the copyright on this material.
  • The FamilySearch Wiki for Gloucestershire provides a similar but not identical series of webpages to that provided by GENUKI
  • A Vision of Britain through Time has a group of pages of statistical facts for almost every parish in the county
  • MAPS. Most Wikipedia maps for places in the Bristol area have outline maps indicating the location of the suburb under discussion. Another online map that may be useful is this Ordnance Survey map originally made in 1930 and with revisions to 1946.
  • Unfortunately, A History of the County of Gloucester in the Victoria County History series provided by the website British History Online does not cover all of Bristol--and the area that was originally in Gloucestershire is sadly omitted, save for the information on the churches in A History of the County of Gloucester: Volume 2
  • England and Wales Jurisdictions 1851 provides a map illustrating the locations of the various Bristol parishes. Enter "Bristol" in the search box at the top left, then select the parish required from the list below the search box.


This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Winterbourne, Gloucestershire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Frenchay. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.