Place:Bath and North East Somerset, Somerset, England

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NameBath and North East Somerset
Alt namesBANESsource: abbreviation for Bath and North East Somerset used locally (Wikipedia)
TypeUnitary authority
Coordinates51.416°N 2.499°W
Located inSomerset, England     (1996 - )
See alsoWansdyke, Avon, Englanddistrict in which Bath and North East Somerset was located 1974-1996
Somerset, Englandcounty from which this part of Avon taken in 1974
Bath, Somerset, Englandmunicipal district transferred to Wansdyke, Avon in 1974 and then to BANES in 1996|
Keynsham, Somerset, Englandurban district transferred to Wansdyke, Avon in 1974 and then to BANES in 1996|
Bathavon (rural), Somerset, Englandrural district transferred to Wansdyke, Avon in 1974 and then to BANES in 1996|
Keynsham (rural), Somerset, Englandrural district transferred to Wansdyke, Avon in 1974 and then to BANES in 1996|
Norton Radstock (rural), Somerset, Englandrural district transferred to Wansdyke, Avon in 1974 and then to BANES in 1996|
Clutton (rural), Somerset, Englandrural district part transferred to Wansdyke, Avon in 1974 and then to BANES in 1996|

Bath and North East Somerset is a unitary authority within the ceremonial county of Somerset. It was established in 1996 when the County of Avon was abolished.

this section is based on an article in Wikipedia

Bath and North East Somerset covers an area of 220 square miles (570 km2), of which two thirds is green belt. It stretches from the outskirts of Bristol, south into the Mendip Hills and east to the southern Cotswold Hills and Wiltshire border. The city of Bath is the principal settlement in the district, but [the authority] also covers Keynsham, Midsomer Norton, Radstock, Westfield and the Chew Valley. While Avon County was in existence, the rural part of Bath and North East Somerset was covered by a district named Wansdyke.

The area has varied geography including river valleys and rolling hills. The history of human habitation is long but expanded massively during Roman times, and played significant roles in the Saxon era and English civil war. Industry developed from a largely agricultural basis to include coal mining in the 19th century. The industry precipitated the coming of canals and railways. Bath developed as a spa resort in Georgian times and remains a major cultural tourism centre having gained World Heritage City status.

For more information, see the EN Wikipedia article Bath and North East Somerset. especially the sections entitled "History" (highly recommended) and "Governance" (including the list of civil parishes and former rural districts and the link to Google maps showing their locations).

The article Somerset Coalmining gives a history of the coalfield and a list of the collieries together with the periods during which each operated.

Research Tips

Archives and Libraries

  • The Somerset Heritage Centre (incorporating what was formerly the Somerset Record Office and the Somerset Local Studies Library) can be found at its new location at Langford Mead in Taunton. The Heritage Centre has an email address:archives@somerset.gov.uk.
  • Each Library in Somerset has its own web page. The index page to libraries leads to each of the libraries along with the facilities to be found there.
  • The Somerset pages of GENUKI contain a great amount of useful data and references to other websites. Some of the web links are not up to date.
  • The four family history societies covering parts of Somerset are:
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Bath and North East Somerset. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.