Place:Barnsley, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

NameBarnsley
Alt namesBarnsley, York, Englandsource: Family History Library Catalog
Berneslaisource: Domesday Book (1985) p 313
TypeBorough (county)
Coordinates53.55°N 1.474°W
Located inWest Riding of Yorkshire, England     (1869 - 1974)
Also located inYorkshire, England    
South Yorkshire, England     (1974 - )
See alsoBarnsley (metropolitan borough), South Yorkshire, Englandunitary authority of which it is the principal part since 1986
Staincross Wapentake, West Riding of Yorkshire, Englandwapentake in which it was historically located|
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
source: Family History Library Catalog


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Barnsley is a town in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies on the River Dearne, north of the city of Sheffield, south of Leeds and west of Doncaster. Barnsley is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, of which Barnsley is the largest and the administrative centre. The metropolitan borough had a population of 231,900 at the 2011 UK Census; Barnsley urban Area had a population of 71,599 (2001census) .

Barnsley is notable as a former industrial town centred on coal mining and glassmaking although in the town few factories remain, notably the glassworks and coking plant. Though these industries declined in the 20th century, Barnsley's local culture remains rooted in this industrial heritage; Barnsley has a tradition of brass bands, originally created as social clubs for its mining communities.

It is between junctions 36 and 38 of the M1 motorway and has a railway station served by the Hallam and Penistone Lines. Barnsley F.C. is the local football club.

The following villages are considered to be parts of Barnsley: Pogmoor, Gawber, Mapplewell, and Wilthorpe.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

The first reference to Barnsley occurs in 1086 in the Domesday Book, in which it is called 'Berneslai' and has a population of around 200. The origin of the name Barnsley is subject to debate, but Barnsley Council claims that its origins lie in the Saxon word "Berne", for barn or storehouse, and "Lay, for field.

The town lay in the parish of Silkstone and developed little until in the 1150s when it was given to the monastery of St John, Pontefract. The monks built a new town where three roads met: the Sheffield to Wakefield, Rotherham to Huddersfield and Cheshire to Doncaster routes. The Domesday village became known as "Old Barnsley", and a town grew up on the new site.

The monks erected a chapel-of-ease dedicated to Saint Mary, which survived until 1820 , and established a market. In 1249, a Royal Charter was granted to Barnsley permitting it to hold a weekly market on Wednesdays and annual four-day fair at Michaelmas. By the 1290s, three annual fairs were held. The town was the centre of the Staincross wapentake, but in the mid-16th century had only 600 inhabitants.[1]

From the 17th century, Barnsley developed into a stop-off point on the route between Leeds, Wakefield, Sheffield and London. The traffic generated as a result of its location fuelled trade, with hostelries and related services prospering. A principal centre for linen weaving during the 18th and 19th century, Barnsley grew into an important manufacturing town. Barnsley has a long tradition of glass-making,[2] but is most famous for its coal mines. George Orwell mentioned the town in The Road to Wigan Pier. He spent a number of days in the town living in the houses of the working class miners while researching for the book. He wrote very critically of the council's expenditure on the construction of Barnsley Town Hall and claimed that the money should have been spent on improving the housing and living conditions of the local miners.

Barnsley became a municipal borough in 1869 and achieved county borough status in 1913. In the first half of the 19th century and before, it was a town in the ecclesiastical parish of Silkstone and located in the wapentake of Staincross.

Research Tips

  • GENUKI on Barnsley. The GENUKI page gives numerous references to local bodies providing genealogical assistance.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time on Barnsley.
  • Barnsley had three ecclesiastical parishes. The FamilySearch wiki provides separate pages for each. Barnsley St. Mary, Barnsley St George, and Barnsley St John.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time also provides links to three maps for what is now South Yorkshire, produced by the United Kingdom Ordnance Survey, illustrating the boundaries between the civil parishes and the rural districts at various dates. These maps all blow up to a scale that will illustrate small villages and large farms or estates.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1888. The "Sanitary Districts (which preceded the rural districts) for the whole of the West Riding.
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding South 1900. The rural and urban districts, not long after their introduction. (the southern part of Bradford, the southern part of Leeds, the southern part of Tadcaster Rural District, the southern part of Selby, Goole Rural District, and all the divisions of Halifax, Huddersfield, Wakefield, Doncaster, Barnsley, Rotherham and Sheffield)
  • Ordnance Survey West Riding 1944. The urban and rural districts of the whole of the West Riding after the revisions of 1935.
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