Place:Barnes, Surrey, England

Watchers
NameBarnes
TypeParish, Borough (municipal), Suburb
Coordinates51.468°N 0.26°W
Located inSurrey, England     ( - 1965)
See alsoRichmond upon Thames (London Borough), Greater London, EnglandLondon Borough in which it has been located since 1965
source: Family History Library Catalog
the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Barnes is a suburban district in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is located in the extreme east of the borough and is centred 5.8 miles (9.3 km) west south-west of Charing Cross (a point considered to be the centre of London from which distances are measured) in a bend of the River Thames.

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Barnes was a local government district in north west Surrey from 1894 to 1965. It was originally formed as an urban district and became a municipal borough in 1932. Prior to 1894 it was an ancient parish and a civil parish in the county of Surrey.

As a local government district it contained the settlements of Barnes, Mortlake and East Sheen. It was part of the London postal district and Metropolitan Police District, but it was still considered to be part of Surrey. The district was bounded by the County of London to the east, the River Thames and Middlesex to the north, and the Municipal Borough of Richmond to the west and south. The area to the north of the Thames opposite Barnes is Chiswick.

In 1965 the municipal borough was abolished and its former area joined with the Municipal Borough of Richmond to become the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in Greater London.

History

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

The original Norman chapel of St Mary's, Barnes' village church, was built at some point between 1100 and 1150. It was subsequently extended in the early thirteenth century, and again c. 1485 and in 1786. After a major fire in 1978 destroyed the Victorian and Edwardian additions to the building, restoration work was completed in 1984.

Some of the oldest riverside housing in London is to be found on The Terrace, a road lined with Georgian mansions which runs along the west bend of the river. Construction of these mansions began as early as 1720. In the 20th century Gustav Holst and Ninette de Valois lived in houses on this stretch, both of which have corresponding blue plaques. The Terrace also has an original red brick police station, built in 1891. It has been remodelled as apartments but still preserves the original features.

The pink-fronted Rose House facing the area's pond dates to the 17th century, while Milbourne House facing The Green, the area's oldest, parts of which date to the 16th century, once belonged to Henry Fielding (1707-1754). The park of Barn Elms, formerly the manor house of Barnes, which was for long the parish's chief property, is now an open space and playing field.

The listed Barnes Railway Bridge, originally constructed in 1849 by Joseph Locke, dominates the view of the river from The Terrace.

Castelnau, in north Barnes and on the banks of the river, has a small church, Holy Trinity. The area between Castelnau and Lonsdale Road contains a 1930s council estate (including roads such as Nowell Road, Stillingfleet Road and Washington Road), mostly consisting of "Boot Houses", constructed by the Henry Boot company.

The Thames Boat Race, held in the spring every year between the rowing teams of Oxford and Cambridge Universities, covers this part of the River Thames.

Surrey Research Tips

Part of a list taken from GENUKI

Archives and Libraries

Cemeteries

Surrey Cemeteries & Crematoriums

Church Records

Civil Registration

  • Registration Districts in Surrey for the period 1837 to the present. By drilling down through the links you can follow any parish through the registration districts to which it was attached.

Government

Administrative boundaries of the county of Surrey (Surrey History Centre)

History

Maps

Societies

Greater London Research Tips

  • See wiki.familysearch.org under "London" and also under "Middlesex", "Surrey" and "Kent" for key information about Greater London's jurisdictions and records, plus links to indexes, reference aids and Family History Library holdings.
  • The London Metropolitan Archives (40 Northampton Road, Clerkenwell, London EC1R 0HB) holds records relating to the whole of Greater London. Ancestry (subscription necessary) has produced transcriptions and provides images of lists of baptisms, marriages, and burials in churches across Greater London. These lists start in 1813 and stretch into the 20th century.
  • GENUKI has a long list of websites and archive holders in addition to London Metropolitan Archives above. (The list from GENUKI is not maintained so well that there is never a dead link in it. However, it is often worth googling the title given on the page just in case the contributor has reorganized their website.)
  • GENUKI also has a list of the Archives and Local Studies Libraries for each of the boroughs of Greater London.
  • The London Encyclopaedia by Ben Weinreb and Christopher Hibbert. An e-book available online through Google, originally published by Pan Macmillan. There is a search box in the left-hand pane.
  • London Lives. A very useful free website for anyone researching their London ancestors between the years 1690-1800. This is a fully searchable edition of 240,000 manuscripts from eight archives and fifteen datasets, giving access to 3.35 million names.
  • London Ancestor, a website belonging to one of the London family history societies, has a list of transcriptions of directories from the 18th century, listing in one case "all the squares, streets, lanes, courts, yards, alleys, &C. in and about Five Miles of the Metropolis..." In other parts of the same website are maps of various parts of 19th century London and Middlesex.
  • The proceedings of the Old Bailey, London's central criminal court, 1674-1913. A fully searchable edition of the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published, containing 197,745 criminal trials held at London's central criminal court. This website is free to use.
  • Registration Districts in London, Registration Districts in Middlesex, Registration Districts in Surrey, Registration Districts in Kent, are lists of the registration districts used for civil registration (births, marriages and deaths, as well as the censuses). There are linked supporting lists of the parishes which made up each registration district, the dates of formation and abolition of the districts, the General Register Office numbers, and the local archive-holding place. This work has been carried out by Brett Langston under the agency of GENUKI (Genealogy United Kingdom and Ireland) and UKBMD - Births, Marriages, Deaths & Censuses on the Internet.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Barnes, London. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Municipal Borough of Barnes. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.