Place:Avranches, Avranches, Manche, France

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NameAvranches
Alt namesAbrincaesource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 2
Abrincataesource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 2
Abrincatuisource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 2
Abruncasource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 2
Avrencessource: Orbis Latinus (1971) p 2
TypeCommune
Coordinates48.7°N 1.35°W
Located inAvranches, Manche, France
source: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Avranches is a commune in the Manche department in the Lower Normandy region in northwestern France. It is a subprefecture of the department. The inhabitants are called Avranchinais.

History

the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

By the end of the Roman period, the settlement of Ingena, capital of the Abrincatui tribe, had taken the name of the tribe itself. This was the origin of the name Avranches. In 511 the town became the seat of a bishopric (suppressed in 1790) and subsequently of a major Romanesque cathedral dedicated to Saint Andrew which was dismantled during the French revolutionary period. As the region of Brittany emerged from the Roman region of Armorica, Avranchin was briefly held by Alan I, King of Brittany as part of the Kingdom of Brittany at the turn of the 10th century. The regions that later became the Duchies of Normandy and Brittany each experienced devastating Viking raids, with Brittany occupied by Vikings from 907 to 937. In 933 Avranches and its territory, the Avranchin, were ceded to the Normans.

In 1172 (September 27–28) a council was held at Avranches in response to the murder of Anglo-Norman Saint Thomas Becket. Henry II, King of England, after due penance done at Avranches on 21 May 1172, was absolved from the censures incurred by the assassination of the holy prelate and reached the Compromise of Avranches with the Church, swearing fidelity to Pope Alexander III in the person of the papal legate.


The same council was forbidden to confer on children benefice, carrying with it the cure of souls, or on the children of priests for the churches of their fathers. Each parish was required to have an assistant (vicarius), and the Advent fast was commended to all who could observe it, especially to ecclesiastics.

The town was damaged in both the Hundred Years' War and the Wars of Religion.

Álvaro Vaz de Almada was made 1st Count of Avranches by King Henry VI of England on August 8, 1444.

A literal description of the town in the 19th century is recorded in Guy de Maupassant's novel Notre Cœur, when the main character Mariolle meets his lover and sets up for Mont Saint-Michel:
The houses crowning the heights gave to the place from a distance the appearance of a fortification. Seen close at hand, it was an ancient and pretty Norman city, with small dwellings of regular and almost similar appearance built closely adjoining one another, giving an aspect of ancient pride and modern comfort, a feudal yet peasant-like air.

The liberation of Avranches during World War II was led by General George S. Patton and began on 31 July 1944.

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This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Avranches. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
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