Place:Acton (near Nantwich), Cheshire, England

Watchers
NameActon (near Nantwich)
Alt namesBurfordsource: hamlet in parish
Dorfoldsource: hamlet in parish
TypeTownship, Civil parish
Coordinates53.073°N 2.549°W
Located inCheshire, England
See alsoActon, Cheshire, Englandancient parish of which it was a township
Nantwich Hundred, Cheshire, Englandhundred in which it was situated
Nantwich Rural, Cheshire, Englandrural district in which it was located 1894-1974
Crewe and Nantwich District, Cheshire, Englanddistrict municipality covering the area 1974-2009
Cheshire East District, Cheshire, Englanddistrict municipality and unitary authority covering the area since 2009
source: Family History Library Catalog
source: Family History Library Catalog


NOTE: There is also a town named Acton (near Weaverham) in the western part of Cheshire which is now known as Cheshire West and Chester. In 1967 Acton (near Weaverham) was officially renamed Acton Bridge. It has also been known simply as Acton or Acton-in-Delamere. Acton (near Nantwich) has also simply been known as Acton. If possible, the two should not be confused.

the following text is based on an article in Wikipedia

Acton (near Nantwich) is a small village and civil parish lying immediately west of the town of Nantwich in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The civil parish also includes the small settlement of Dorfold and part of Burford, and in the 21st century has a total population of a little over 300. It is administered jointly with the adjacent civil parishes of Henhull and Edleston. Historically, Acton refers to a township and also to an ancient parish in the Nantwich Hundred covering a wide area to the west of Nantwich.

The area is agricultural, with dairy farming the main industry. Around a third of the area falls within the Dorfold Estate. Historically, agriculture was the major employer, but it has now been overtaken by the service industries, with many residents commuting significant distances outside the parish to work.

The civil parish is believed to have been inhabited since the 8th or 9th century. It contains many historic buildings, including two listed at grade I: Dorfold Hall, a Jacobean house, while St. Mary's Church has a tower dating from the 13th century, one of the earliest in the county.

The population was 262 in 1801, 351 in 1851, 258 in 1901, 293 in 1951, and 311 in 2001. (Source: GENUKI)

St. Mary's Church

There is a separate article on St. Mary's Church in Wikipedia. A church has been present on this site since before the time of the Domesday Survey of 1086. The tower is the oldest in Cheshire, although it had to be largely rebuilt after it fell in 1757. One unusual feature of the interior of the church is that the old stone seating around its sides has been retained. In the south aisle are some ancient carved stones dating back to the Norman era.

The article mentions members of the various local families who contributed to the building of the church over the centuries since its founding. The church and its lands were given by the second Baron of Wich Malbank to Combermere Abbey early in the 12th century. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, the advowson or patronage was granted to Richard Wilbraham and it then passed to the Lords Tollemache. (Wilbraham Tollemache is represented here in WeRelate.)

Research Tips

  • The GENUKI and UKBMD pages on Cheshire and its parishes point to many other sources of information on places within the county. The many small parishes and townships that existed before 1866 are treated individually as well as the larger towns and conurbations.
  • A Vision of Britain through Time provides a series of maps from the Ordnance Survey illustrating the towns and villages of Cheshire and also the borders between parishes. The following group of maps provide views of the county at various dates, illustrating the changes in administrative structure.
  • Cheshire Archives and Local Studies have organized a facility to compare 19th century maps (including tithe maps circa 1830) with modern Ordnance Survey maps. These are available for every civil parish. The detail is very magnified and it is difficult to read any placenames on the older maps. Cheshire Archives and Local Studies are the local keepers of historical material for the county.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Acton, Cheshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at St Mary's Church, Acton. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.