Person:William Wilson (273)

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William Wilson
b.16 November 1722 Ireland
m. 1726
  1. William Wilson1722 - 1801
  2. James Wilson1738 -
m. 1746
  1. Col. Benjamin Wilson, Sr., of Tygart Valley1747 - 1827
  2. Archibald Wilson1749 - 1814
  3. David Wilson1751 - 1805
  4. William Wilson1754 - 1851
  5. John Wilson1756 - 1827
  6. Moses Wilson1758 - 1760
  7. Moses Wilson1761 - 1786
  8. James Wilson1763 - 1822
  9. Solomon Wilson1766 - 1819
  10. Elizabeth Wilson1766 - 1849
  11. Margaret Wilson1769 - 1826
Facts and Events
Name William Wilson
Gender Male
Birth[1][2] 16 November 1722 Ireland
Marriage 1746 (later) Hardy County, Virginiato Elizabeth Blackburn
Death[1][2] 12 June 1801 Trout Run, Hardy County, Virginia

William Wilson was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Land Records

  • May 1770 - William Wilson bought from Andrew Vannoy two tracts of land, 318 acres, on Lost River in Hardy County, Virginia
  • August 1771 - William Wilson bought from David Williams, 118 acres on both sides of Lost River, and 438 acres from James Scott in Hardy County, Virginia


Will Transcript

WILL of WILLIAM WILSON.
IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN, I William Wilson of the County of Hardy and Commonwealth of Virginia, being sick and weak in body, but of sound mind, memory and understanding, thanks be to God for his mercies, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, and being desirous to settle my wordly affairs, & thereby be the better prepared to leave this world, when it shall please God to call me, hence, do therefore make and publish this my last Will and testament, in manner and form following, (that is to say)-
FIRST, and principally I commend my soul to God who gave it, and my body I commit to the earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my dear wife and executors hereafter named, who I doubt not will manage it with all requisite prudence. And to such worldly estate as God of his Goodness hath bestowed upon me, after my Just Debts & funeral charges are paid I give and bequeath to my loving wife Elizabeth Wilson one third part of all my movable estate after my Just debts and the Legacies herein after mentioned, also a Negro wench named Sue, during her life or widowhood, also that end of my dwelling house, known by the name of my bed room, and half the kitchen adjoining said room, and all the Garden, where she shall choose, likewise, she shall have not less than fifteen Bushells of wheat, ten of Rye, and ten of corn, three houndred pounds of meal and twenty Gallons of Rye Liquor, or brandy annually, and one horse and two cows fed (upon her buying the said cows and Horse of her own property) at the expence of my son James Wilson-
ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my sons Benjamin, Archibald, William & John Wilson, and to my Grand son William Wilson, son of Benjamin Wilson, five shillings sterling each, to them and their heirs forever-
ITEM, I give and bequeath unto Moses Wilson, son of William Wilson, two hundred and Eighteen acres of that land I bought of James Scot to him the said Moses Wilson, his heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my Grand son Archibald Wilson, son of Archibald Wilson, two hundred and Eighteen acres of that land I bought of James Scot to him the said Archibald Wilson, his heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my son David Wilson, two hundred and fifty acres of the lower end of the plantation whereon he now lives, to him the said David, his heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I will and bequeath to my Grandson, Jacob Wilson, son of David Wilson two hundred and fifty acres of land, the remaining part of that tract of land whereon David Wilson now lives, adjoining to George Claypool, to him the said Jacob Wilson his heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my eldest Daughter, Elizabeth Claypoole, a Negro wench named Poll, to her the said Elizabeth Claypoole, her heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I give and bequeath to my youngest Daughter, Margaret Ruddle, a young Negro Girl named Linda to her the said Margaret Ruddell her heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I give and bequeath to my youngest son Solomon Wilson, the tract of land known by the name of the lick place, also the water, and water courses from the head of the big spring down to the corner line between the two old surveys, standing on the S. E. side of said river at the head of the long bottom, then the land from the opposite said corner on the N.W. side of said run including all the new survey made by Mr. Poston, thence down the S. E. side of said run till opposite the mill, thence leaving the run at the head of the bottom and running down the middle of the bank which divides the high lands from the bottom till opposite the alum rock, thence across the bottom and across the run until Blackburn's line including all Blackburn's place and so much of the lower old survey as lies on the N.W. side of said run and water mark whereon the mills stand, likewise a Negro Boy named Sam, to him the said Solomon together with the Smith's Tolls, his heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I give and bequeath unto my son, James Wilson the plantation whereon I now live, except so much of the lower survey as is devised as above to my son Solomon, the upper survey containing one hundred and twenty five acres, and the lower survey two hundred & twenty five- also the Negro wench named Sue, at his mother's decease, to him the said James Wilson, his heirs and assigns forever.
ITEM, I will & bequeath that my still and the utensils thereunto belonging be the Joint property of my two sons James and Solomon Wilson, and that after my debts and Legacies are paid the moveable estate be equally divided between my wife Elizabeth Wilson, and my said sons James and Solomon Wilson, the bonds and book Debts, which shall be equally divided between my said sons James and Solomon, likewise that Solomon during his mother's life do pay annually unto his brother James for the support of their mother, five Bushels of Wheat & five bushels of Corn, and ten gallons of Rye liquor or brandy.
And Lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my sons Archibald Wilson, James Wilson, and David Wilson, executors of this my last Will and Testament, revoking and annuling all former wills by me heretofore made, ratifying and confirming this and non- other to be my last Will and Testament. In Testimony Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this____day of May 26, in the year of our lord one Thousand seven hundred and Ninety four, and in the eighteenth year of American Independence.
(Signed) William Wilson (Seal)
Signed, sealed, published & Declared in the presence of us,
John Harford,
John Steward,
James x Steward [His Mark]
At a court held for Hardy County the 9th day of September, 1801.
This Last Will and Testament of William Wilson, dec'd. was proved by the oaths of John Steward and James Steward, two of the witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded, and on the motion of Archibald Wilson, James Wilson, and David Wilson, the executors therein names, who made oath thereto according to Law, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form, giving security, whereupon they with Christian Simon and Anthony Miller, their securities, entered into and acknowledged a bond in the penalty of two Thousand dollars, conditioned as the Law directs.
Ed Williams
[Source: Hardy County, W. VA., County Court Records, Will Book No. 1, page 207]


Wilson DNA Participant

8104 - William Wilson, born in Northern Ireland in 1722. Immigrated in 1737. Died 1801. Lived in Shenandoah Valley, Frederick County, Virginia. Married Elizabeth Blackburn (1725-1806). William was perhaps the son of David Wilson, b. abt. 1685 in Scotland, relocated to Ulster, Northern Ireland.
Source: http://www.m222.net/wilsondna.htm


Notes

Note: according to an IGI submission, William was the son of David Wilson, Jr., b. 1685 in Scotland, buried at Trout Run, Hardy County, Virginia. More research necessary.

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 International Genealogical Index. (LDS Church, 1999-2005).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Find A Grave.
  3.   WILLIAM WILSON (XV 1), born Nov. 16, 1722, in Ireland, came to America in 1737, landing in Philadelphia; afterwards came to Shenandoah County, Virginia. With him were his two cousins, John and William White, both of whom were later killed by Indians in Randolph County, (West) Virginia. The date of his moving is not known but it was not later than 1780 for at that time his son, Moses, died and was buried on the Wilson Homestead on Trout Run, near Wardensville, in Hardy County.
    In May 1770 he bought from Andrew Vannoy two tracts of land, 318 acres, on Lost River; on August 1771, from David Williams, 118 acres on both sides of Lost River, and 438 acres from James Scott. All these tracts are in Hardy County.It was a general custom then for a man to make a "lease and buy" contract for land. The rental was a mere token, often only an ear of corn each year. It is likely this land was leased some earlier than the purchase and he may have been in Hampshire County some years before the death of his son, Moses.
    The will and inventory of William are given at the close of this sketch. They show the manner of writing wills at that time, what property he had, and give a clue as to where the children were. It is interesting to know of the household property of a well-to-do farmer of that period. Compared with the present it seems very meager but evidently he had his home well furnished.
    The graves of William, his wife Elizabeth, and his son Moses are about two miles from Wardensville on the farm of E.W. Garrett. Large trees are in and around the graves. The head stones are still legible in 1942. Several other head stones are still standing and many depressions show still other graves. The owner of the farm, Mr. Garrett, was very courteous to visitors to the graves and gave a good deal of information as to surroundings. Remains of the foundation of the old church are near. The exact location of the graves was not generally known for many years but in the summer of 1937, the writer with the aid of a very old citizen finally located them again.

    http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/v/a/n/Rebecca-Jill-Vandegraft/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0209.html