Person:William Howe (24)

William Howe
b.10 Aug 1729 England
m. 8 Apr 1719
  1. George Augustus Howeabt 1725 - 1758
  2. Richard Howe1726 - 1799
  3. William Howe1729 - 1814
m. 4 Jun 1765
Facts and Events
Name William Howe
Alt Name William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe
Gender Male
Birth[1] 10 Aug 1729 England
Marriage 4 Jun 1765 to Frances Conolly
Immigration[1] 1775 Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United Statescame to America
Military[1][2] Abt 1775 EnglandRev War - General, Commander in Chief of British forces
Immigration[2] 1778 returned to England
Reference Number? Q333422?
Occupation[1] 1808 Plymouth Colonybecame Governor of Plymouth
Death? 12 Jul 1814 Plymouth, Devon, England
Reference Number? Q333422?
Alt Death[1] 12 Jul 1814 Twickenham, Middlesex, Englandno known issue


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, KB, PC (10 August 1729 – 12 July 1814) was a British army officer who rose to become Commander-in-Chief of British forces during the American War of Independence. Howe was one of three brothers who enjoyed distinguished military careers.

Having joined the army in 1746 Howe saw extensive service in the War of the Austrian Succession and Seven Years' War. He became known for his role in the capture of Quebec in 1759 when he led a British force to capture the cliffs at Anse-au-Foulon, allowing James Wolfe to land his army and engage the French, in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham. Howe also participated in the campaigns to take Louisbourg, Belle Île and Havana.

Howe was sent to North America in March 1775, arriving in May after the Revolutionary War broke out. After leading British troops to a costly victory in the Battle of Bunker Hill, Howe took command of all British forces in America from Thomas Gage in September of that year. Howe's record in North America was marked by the successful capture of both New York City and Philadelphia. However, poor British campaign planning for 1777 contributed to the failure of John Burgoyne's Saratoga campaign, which played a major role in the entry of France into the war. Howe's role in developing those plans, and the degree to which he was responsible for British failures that year (despite his personal success at Philadelphia) have been a subject of contemporary and historic debate.

He resigned his post as Commander in Chief, North America, in 1778, and returned to England, where he was at times active in the defence of the British Isles. He served for many years in Parliament, and was knighted after his successes in 1776. He inherited the Viscountcy of Howe upon the death of his brother Richard in 1799. He married, but had no children, and the viscountcy was extinguished with his death in 1814.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Lanier, Henry Wysham. A century of banking in New York, 1822-1922. (New York: The Gilliss Press, 1922), 88.

    HOWE, General Sir William
    Born in 1729, the son of Viscount Scrope. He served in many military positions; in 1775 he arrived in Boston as Commander-in-Chief of the British army in America, and commanded at Bunker Hill. He arrived in Staten Island in 1776 and participated in the battles near New York, his headquarters being in the city. Was made Lieutenant-General in 1777, and superseded as Commander in America by Sir Henry Clinton. On his return to England he received the sinecure appointment of Governor of Berwick; in 1808 he became Governor of Plymouth. He died in 1814 without issue.

  2. 2.0 2.1 William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, last accessed Mar 2017.

    General William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, KB, PC (10 August 1729 – 12 July 1814) was a British Army officer who rose to become Commander-in-Chief of British forces during the American War of Independence. Howe was one of three brothers who had distinguished military careers. ...