Person:William Claiborne (7)

     
Gov. William Charles Cole Claiborne, 1st Governor of Louisiana
m. abt 1770
  1. Gen. Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne1772 - 1815
  2. Gov. William Charles Cole Claiborne, 1st Governor of Louisiana1773 - 1817
  3. Thomas Augustine Claiborne1777 -
  4. Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne1777 - 1859
  5. Mary Leigh Claiborne1781 - 1812
  • HGov. William Charles Cole Claiborne, 1st Governor of Louisiana1773 - 1817
  • WElizabeth W. Lewisabt 1782 - 1804
m. 1801
  1. Cornelia Tennessee Claiborne1801 - 1804
  • HGov. William Charles Cole Claiborne, 1st Governor of Louisiana1773 - 1817
  • WClarissa Duraldeabt 1776 - 1809
m. 17 Sep 1806
  1. William Charles Cole Claiborne, Jr.1808 - 1878
m. 8 Nov 1812
  1. Sophronia Louise Claiborneabt 1813 - 1890
Facts and Events
Name Gov. William Charles Cole Claiborne, 1st Governor of Louisiana
Gender Male
Birth? 13 Aug 1773 Sussex County, Virginia
Alt Birth[3] 1775 Sussex County, Virginia
Education? abt 1790 Richmond, VirginiaEducated almost entirely at Richmond Academy. Matriculated (with his older brother, Ferdinand Leigh) at William & Mary but stayed only a short time.
Marriage 1801 (his 1st wife)
to Elizabeth W. Lewis
Marriage 17 Sep 1806 Attakapas, Louisianato Clarissa Duralde
Marriage 8 Nov 1812 New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana(his 3rd wife, her 1st husband)
to Cayetana Susana Bosque y Fangui
Death[1][2] 23 Nov 1817 New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana
Obituary[11] 21 Mar 1818 New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana
Burial[1] Metairie Cemetery, Orleans Parish, Louisiana


NOTE: For information about the Governor's early life, most subsequent writers have depended on Nathaniel H. Claiborne's Notes on the War in the South (Richmond, 1819). However, Nathaniel was William's brother and was understandably biased.

Image Gallery
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Find A Grave.

    Originally interred in St. Louis Cemetery #1 in New Orleans, but that was a Catholic cemetery and he was Protestant, so he was subsequently moved to the new Metairie Cemetery. Find a Grave
    Image:Claiborne, William C C - grave marker.jpg

    See also: Claiborne Family Tomb (Metairie Cemetery, Orleans Parish, Louisiana)

  2. Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 311.

    Elected to the U.S. Senate by the Louisiana State Senate, 13 Jan 1817, but died before taking his seat.

  3. Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 3.
  4.   Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 6.

    In 1790, he left Richmond and moved to New York City, then the national capital, where he sought and gained employment with John Beckley of Virginia, who was then Clerk of the House of Representatives. As enrolling clerk copying bills and resolutions, he gained great experience in the technical aspects of legislation but was increasingly asked to draft new bills for the members of Congress.

  5.   Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 9-10.

    He moved from Philadelphia to Sullivan County, Tennessee, where he was licensed to practice law on 22 May 1794. He was very successful in his practice and acquired considerable money.

  6.   Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 18.

    Appointed a member of the first Supreme Court of Tennessee in 1796 but remained on the bench only a year; he couldn't handle the financial sacrifice of giving up his law practice.

  7.   Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 12-16.

    Delegate from Sullivan County to the Tennessee statehood convention, 11 Jan 1796, in which he played an active role despite his youth.

  8.   Boddie, John Bennett. Virginia Historical Genealogies. (Redwood City, California: Pacific Coast Publishers, 1954), p. 42.

    In Nov 1797, he began the first of two terms as a Tennessee Representative to the U.S. Congress (Democratic-Republican) -- technically under the age required by the Constitution and the youngest Representative in congressional history. He cast the deciding vote in 1800 that determined the tied presidential election of Thomas Jefferson over Aaron Burr.

  9.   Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 207.

    In 1801, Pres. Jefferson, appointed him Governor of Mississippi Territory.

  10.   Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. (Lafayette, Louisiana: University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1976), p. 327.
  11. Susquehanna [Pa.] Centinel, p. 1, 21 Mar 1818.

    Originally published in the Orleans Gazette, of which I have not been able to find a copy, but it was widely republished by newspapers around the country.
    Image:Claiborne, William C C - long obit 1817.pdf

  12.   Tennessee Gazette (Nashville), p. 1, 28 May 1800.

    As Claiborne was about to leave Congress, to be appointed Governor of Mississippi Territory, he wrote what has become a moderately famous political circular letter to his Tennessee constituents. See: Image:Claiborne, William C C - circular letter.pdf

  13.   William C. C. Claiborne, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).

    the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

    William Charles Cole Claiborne (before 23 November 1772, or on 13 August 1773, or between 23 November 1773 and 23 November 1774, or in August 1775 – 23 November 1817) was a United States politician, best known as the first Governor of Louisiana after U.S. Statehood. He also has the distinction of possibly being the youngest Congressman in U.S. history, though reliable sources differ about his age.