Person:William Bean (3)

m. ABT 1720
  1. Capt William "Billy" Bean1721 - 1782
  2. Jane Bean1722 - ABT 1791
  3. George BeanBEF 1724 -
  4. Elizabeth Bean1723 - AFT 1800
  5. Robert Bean1725 -
  6. Edmund BeanBEF 1730 -
  7. Jesse BeanBEF 1732 -
  8. John Bean1735 -
  • HCapt William "Billy" Bean1721 - 1782
  • WLydia Russell1726 - BEF 1788
m. ABT 1743
  1. Mordecai Bean1744 - 1814
  2. Captain William R. BeanABT 1745 - 1799
  3. Robert Bean1750 - 1793
  4. George BeanABT 1754 - ABT 1820
  5. Jesse Bean1756 - 1827
  6. John BeanABT 1760 - ABT 1811
  7. Edmund BeanABT 1763 - 1807
  8. Jane BeanABT 1766 - 1798
  9. Sarah BeanABT 1768 - 1861
  10. Russell Bean1769 - 1826
Facts and Events
Name[4] Capt William "Billy" Bean
Gender Male
Birth? 9 DEC 1721 St. Stephens Parish Northumberland County, Virginia
Marriage ABT 1743 Northumberland County, Virginia or Greensboro, Guilford, NCto Lydia Russell
Military[4] 1776 - 1780 Captain in the Watauga Riflemen
Military[4] 7 October 1780 North Carolina, USABattle of Kings Mountain
Other[4] his wife, Lydia, was captured by hostile Cherokee Indians
Will[3] 6 JAN 1782 Washington County, Tennessee
Death? MAY 1782 German Creek, Washington (now Grainger) County, Tennessee
Burial[1] unknown

William and Lydia lived in the western portion of Halifax County, Virginia where William and others were ordered to lay out a road from William's house to the courthouse. In 1766 the area in which they lived became Pittsylvania County. In 1768 and 1769 they sold their land in Pittsylvania County and moved into the wilderness of the Great Smokey Mountains in what would later become eastern Tennessee. William Bean moved his family into the new country of Tennessee early in the year 1769. He built a cabin on a point between Boone's Creek and Watauga river, just above the mouth of the creek. Ramsey says Bean had camped here while hunting with Daniel Boone and was familiar with the country. In 1769, the year that Boone first went to Kentucky, the first permanent settlers came to the banks of the Watauga, the settlement being merely an enlargement of the Virginia settlement, which had for a short time existed on the head-waters of the Holston, especially near Wolf Hills, (now Abingdon).

  • 1767: First List of Tithables, Pittsylvania County, VA
  • 1768: Tennessee the Volunteer State Vol. 1 - Biographies of professional individuals residing in Tennessee from 1769-1923, Page50.
  • 1769: The Overmountain Men, Pat Aldeman, The Overmountain Press, 1970,Page 13
  • 1769: Tennessee The Volunteer State Vol 1 - Biographies of professional individuals residing in Tennessee from 1769-1923, Page 63
  • 1776: Tennessee The Volunteer State Vol 1 - Biographies of professional individuals residing in Tennessee from 1769-1923. Page166, 247
  • 1776: DAR Patriot Index - Centennial Edition, Part 1, 1990
  • 1782: Last Will & Testament of William Bean, Jonesboro, Tennessee Courthouse, Vol. 1, page 4

His wife, Lydia, was captured along with 13 year old Samuel Moore in July 1776 by hostile Cherokee Indians. Rescued by Nancy Ward, "Beloved Woman" of the Cherokees. N2

Also see

References
  1. #58613847 , in Find A Grave.
  2.   Acklen, Jeanette. Tennessee Records: Tombstone Inscriptions and Manuscripts, pg. 188.

    1.1 Acklen, Jeanette. Tennessee Records: Tombstone Inscriptions and Manuscripts, pg. 188.

    Captain William Bean, Jr., was born in Virginia about 1745; died in Grainger County, 1799. Court records of that county prove time of death. He was Captain under Col. John Sevier.
    Capt. William Bean Sr., born about 1720; died in Washington County in 1782, his will being probated in that year. Russell, the first white child born in the state, is mentioned in his will. William Bean built the first cabin; he was a member of the Committee of Safety and a member of the Watauga Association.

  3. Last Will and Testament of William Bean, Jonesboro, Tennessee
    Courthouse, Vol. I, page 4. Will proven in court May 2, 1782. The
    land and mill where William Bean and Lydia lived was willed to Russell
    at the death of Lydia. The mill was not built until 1780. (Court
    Records of Washington Co. Tenn. February Term, 1780 "ordered Wm.
    Bean build a mill on Boones Creek"). This land was recorded in
    Washington County, Tennessee, Deeds Vol. 4, pg. 222, a grant from
    North Carolina #931 to William Bean 400 acres on north side of
    Boone's Creek, adj. Henry Long's and William Bean, Jr.'s line,
    crossing Boone Creek to a post oak in William Stone's line. Deeded to
    Russell Bean November 17, 1790. according to Washington Co. Tenn.
    Tax List 17990-91, Russell Bean was shown owning 400 acres. Russell
    Bean was only 13 years old when his father died, hence the estate was
    not settled until 1790. Russell was now 21 years of age, and his
    mother was dead.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Website: Bean Geneology, Bean Notables and Anecdotes