Person:Thomas Pelham (13)

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Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham
b.1653
d.23 Feb 1712
  1. Elizabeth Pelham - 1723
  2. Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham1653 - 1712
  3. Henry Pelham, Clerk of the Pells1661 - 1721
  1. Lucy Pelham - 1736
  2. Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne1693 - 1768
  3. Henry Pelham1694 - 1754
  4. Frances Pelham - 1756
  • HThomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham1653 - 1712
  • W.  Elizabeth Jones (add)
m. 26 Nov 1679
  1. Elizabeth Pelham - 1711
Facts and Events
Name Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham
Gender Male
Birth[1] 1653
Marriage 26 Nov 1679 to Elizabeth Jones (add)
Death[1] 23 Feb 1712


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham of Laughton Bt (1653–23 February 1712) was a moderate English Whig politician and Member of Parliament for several constituencies. He is best remembered as father of two British prime ministers (Henry Pelham and the Duke of Newcastle) who, between them, served for 18 years as first minister. Pelham was born in Laughton, Sussex, the son of Sir John Pelham, 3rd Baronet and his wife Lucy Sidney (daughter of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester). Pelham was educated at Tonbridge School and Christ Church, Oxford. He sat for East Grinstead from October 1678 until August 1679. In October 1679 he was returned for Lewes, serving until 1702 (when he was returned for both Lewes and Sussex); he subsequently chose to sit for Sussex, a seat he held until 1705.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   Thomas Pelham, 1st Baron Pelham of Laughton, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.