Person:Thomas McSpadden (3)

Watchers
Thomas McSpadden
b.12 March 1748 Augusta County, Virginia
m. Abt. 1743
  1. Sarah McSpaddenabt 1745 - bet 1818-1820
  2. Alexander McSpaddenabt 1746 - 1787
  3. Thomas McSpadden1748 - 1833
  4. Archibald Edmiston McSpadden1749/50 - 1840
  5. Isabel McSpaddenabt 1752 - bef 1820
  6. Moses McSpaddenabt 1753 - 1827
  7. Samuel McSpadden, "Gun Powder Sam"1758 - 1844
Facts and Events
Name Thomas McSpadden
Gender Male
Birth[1] 12 March 1748 Augusta County, Virginia
Death[1] 11 May 1833 Davidson County, Tennessee
Image:Long Boone Cumberland--thin.jpg
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Thomas McSpadden

Contents

Template:Register:Thomas McSpadden (3)
Source Materials
                  
Notebook
Disambiguation
GeoGroup

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Overview

This article concerns the Thomas McSpadden who served in the Militia of Washington County during the Revolution. The best source of information about him is found in his 1832 pension application, in which he states that he was born in 1748 in Augusta County. Land records show that he and other family members were settled on the Laurel Fork of the South Branch of the Holston, Southwest Virginia by about 1775. He himself describes where he lived as the "Edmundson's Settlement".[2] Thomas lived here until shortly after the close of the Revolution. In the fall of 1785, he, along with many others, moved to the Cumberland Settlement, in Davidson County, TN. Here he remained until about the year 1809 or 1810 when he moved to Wilson County, TN where he lived out the remainer of his life.

The McSpadden's settled on the Laurel Fork of the South Fork of the Holston.  Moses McSpadden is known to have settled near the mouth of Laurel Fork where it enters the South Fork of the Holston.  Three other McSpaddens (Archibald, Samuel, and Thomas) settled upstream along the Laurel Fork.  Around 1840 a James McSpadden married to Elizabeth Lyle Walker, is described as living in Alvarado (green circle); James apparently inherited the lands of one of the Laurel Creek McSpaddens, but was not apparently a descendant, coming to the area from Rockbridge County. [3] n  The Edmondson family settled throughout the area between the MIddle and South Fork of the Holston. The Family Patriarch, Col. William Edmiston, settled at Lodi (red circle), a few miles to the north of the Laurel Fork.  There are reasons to suspect that the McSpadden's were members of the large, extended Edmondson family.  Some speculate that Thomas' mother was Dorthy Edmiston, daughter of Robert Edmiston who settled south of Timber Ridge on Borden's Grant.  This was the same area where lived Thomas McSpadden, presumed father of the Thomas that settled on Laurel Fork.
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The McSpadden's settled on the Laurel Fork of the South Fork of the Holston. Moses McSpadden is known to have settled near the mouth of Laurel Fork where it enters the South Fork of the Holston. Three other McSpaddens (Archibald, Samuel, and Thomas) settled upstream along the Laurel Fork. Around 1840 a James McSpadden married to Elizabeth Lyle Walker, is described as living in Alvarado (green circle); James apparently inherited the lands of one of the Laurel Creek McSpaddens, but was not apparently a descendant, coming to the area from Rockbridge County. [3] n The Edmondson family settled throughout the area between the MIddle and South Fork of the Holston. The Family Patriarch, Col. William Edmiston, settled at Lodi (red circle), a few miles to the north of the Laurel Fork. There are reasons to suspect that the McSpadden's were members of the large, extended Edmondson family. Some speculate that Thomas' mother was Dorthy Edmiston, daughter of Robert Edmiston who settled south of Timber Ridge on Borden's Grant. This was the same area where lived Thomas McSpadden, presumed father of the Thomas that settled on Laurel Fork.

Revolutionary War Service

From his pension application:

The Indians had been for some time annoying the frontiers of Virginia. [In the summer of] 1777 the Indians crossed over the Clinch River & killed a family called Beck, he had but just returned home from Richland Station as one of the guard & was at home only two or three days, when the depredations & murder of the Beck family occurred & he then was called upon immediately to turn out & pursued them....Captain Edmundson & his Company pursued them as far as Sandy River, and judging from their trail & the freshness of the signs they had nearly overtaken the Indians & was prevented further pursuit after them in consequence of the sickness of George Teter [?][4] whom we could not leave, & had not sufficient force to divide, for previous to his sickness the detachment had been divided & sent in different directions after the enemy. They then returned home having served a tour of two months that summer.
The following year he served under Daniel Smith helping to man one of the forts under his command on the Clinch. In 1778 he served a tour of one month on an expedition to the three forks of New River against the Tories noting that The Tories did not stand to give us battle, we took one prisoner and he was hanged.
In the fall of 1780:
Colonel Campbell required all his effective men to furnish themselves with horses to go upon an expedition against the Tories & British who were embodying in North & South Carolina intending as he understood to bring the North Carolinians under subjection –he started with the troops who fought & conquered at King's Mountain, but did not go far before it occurred to Colonel Campbell & the other officers that the Holston settlements had been left in a most helpless & defenseless situation, it was therefore considered advisable that some of them should return to guard the families thus left against the attack of the Tories or Indians, but most danger was apprehended from the Tories, and Colonel Campbell ordered James Berry he thinks to take back 12 men for the guard – he was one of the men sent back and they continued on duty in this service for one month or more, until the Battle of King's Mountain & the return of Col. Campbell's Militia to the Holston settlements.
In the spring of 1781:
"he went out again under Colonel Campbell in the Company commanded by Captain James Montgomery for Captain Edmundson his former Captain was killed at the battle of King's Mountain – he was in a skirmish with the British at Whitsell's [sic, Wetzel's] Mill on the Waters of Haw River – we had not sufficient strength to give the enemy a battle, but as we retreated we fired upon our pursuers, some men were killed, William Berry of his company was killed – we retreated until we joined the Main Army under General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene]...."We lost nearly all our horses." He served about one month and was discharged & returned home. Colonel Campbell went on with the Main Army & never returned."[5]
Thomas McSpadden said he was born abt. 3/12/1748 in Augusta County, Virginia; entered service in 1777 when he resided on Laurel Fork of Holston River at Edmondson Settlement, Virginia; moved 1785 to Davidson County, Tennessee, thence 1809-10 to Williamson County, Tennessee, there he received a Pension in 1832; he died there 5/11/1833 leaving widow Mary; Thomas C. McSpadden (no kinship given) resided there then. F-S2813, R1701. [“Virginia/West Virginia Genealogical Data from Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Records”, Vol. 3, compiled by Patrick G. Wardell, Lt. Col. U.S. Army Ret., pg. 240].

Land Records

  • Page 38 - Thomas McSpaddin...85 ac...Commissioners Certificate...on a branch of Laurel Fork called Beaver Pond fork at the mouth..May 28, 1782 - Thomas McSpadding...100 ac...on the Laurel Fork, branch of the south fork of Holston River, includes improvements, actual settlement made in 1776...August 29, 1781. [Washington County, VA Surveyor's Records].


Personal Data

Personal Data
VitaDatumSource/Basis/Comment
DOB:12th of March 1748Pension Statement
POB:Augusta County, VAPension Statement
DOD:11 MAY 1833Pension application dated Sept 1832. DOD is from an unsourced reference
POD:Mt. Juliet, Wilson, TN[6]
Father:Person:Thomas McSpadden (1)popular wisdom. Lived in Augusta county, associated with the Edmiston's, lived near them. May have married Dorothy Edmiston, daughter of Person:Robert Edmiston (2), but this is unproven
Mother:
Spouse:Amanda Scottunsourced reference; supporting evidence needed.
DOM:
POM:
Children
Name DOB POB DOD POD Spouse DOM POM Dispersion and Notes

Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Wardell, Patrick G. Virginia/West Virginia genealogical data from Revolutionary War pension and bounty land warrant records. (Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, c1988-1998), Vol. 3, pg. 240.
  2. "Edmundson's Settlement" probably refers to the general area between the Middle and South Fork of the Holston where several members of the extended Edmiston family settled beginning about 1770. Thomas and his family settled on the Laurel Fork, a southern tributary of the south Fork of the Holston. This area was about 5 miles south of the community now known as "Lodi", where Edmiston patriarch, Col. William Edmiston lived.
  3. See Source:White, 1902.
  4. This is presumed to be the son of [[Person:George Teater (1) who settled on the Holston about 1773. The Teaters would move on to Kentucky about 1779.
  5. During the Yorktown Campaign Campbell, who had been elevated to the rank of brigadier General, became ill and died.
  6. DOD and POD are from an unsourced reference; the data may be based on pension files, which would be likely to note the DOD, and other data. Withregard to the POD, this is consistent with Pension statements of living in Wilson County in 1832
    He was living on the Laurel fork of Holston River, in Edmundson's settlement when he first entered the service of the United States – lived there till the fall 1785, then moved to Davidson County Tennessee, where he resided until about the year 1809 or 1810 when he moved to Wilson County Tennessee, where he has resided ever since.