Person:William Wray (13)

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Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworth
b.abt 1555
  1. Frances Wray - abt 1634
  2. Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworthabt 1555 - 1617
  • HSir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworthabt 1555 - 1617
  • WLucy Montagu - 1599
m. 6 Apr 1580
  1. Sir John Wray, 2nd Baronet1586 - 1655
  • HSir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworthabt 1555 - 1617
  • WFrances Drury1576 -
Facts and Events
Name Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworth
Gender Male
Birth[1] abt 1555
Marriage 6 Apr 1580 London, London, EnglandSt Benet's Fink
to Lucy Montagu
Death[1][3] 13 Aug 1617 Ashby, Lincolnshire, England


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworth, Lincolnshire (ca. 1555 – 13 August 1617) was an English Member of Parliament.

He represented the constituency of Grimsby from 1584 to 1585, Lincolnshire in 1601 and Grimsby again from 1604 to November 1611. He was appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1594 and was created a baronet on 25 November 1611.

Wray was a patron of religion. The Estate of the Church, with the Discourse of Times (1602), translated and expanded by Simon Patrick from Jean de Hainault was dedicated to him. John Smyth regarded Wray as the major supporter of "godly" religion in the county.

Monuments to Wray and his second wife, Frances (died 1647), and to Susanna Drury, sister of Frances, exist at St Peter's church Ashby cum Fenby.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworth. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworth, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   WRAY, William (c.1555-1617), in The History of Parliament.
  3. Cokayne, George Edward. Complete baronetage, 1611-1880. (Exeter [England]: W. Pollard, 1900-1906), 1:95.