Person:Sigismund III Vasa (1)

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Sigismund III Vasa
b.20 Jun 1566
d.30 Apr 1632 n.s.
  1. Sigismund III Vasa1566 - 1632
  2. Anna Vasa of Sweden1568 - 1625
  1. Władysław IV Vasa1595 - 1648
  1. John II Casimir Vasa1609 - 1672
  2. John Albert Vasa1612 - 1634
  3. Karol Ferdynand Vasa1613 - 1655
  4. Alexander Charles Vasa1614 - 1634
  5. Anna Catherine Constance Vasa1619 - 1651
Facts and Events
Name Sigismund III Vasa
Gender Male
Birth[1] 20 Jun 1566 House of Vasa
Death[1] 30 Apr 1632 n.s.


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Sigismund III Vasa (, English exonym: Sigmund; 20 June 1566 – 30 April 1632 N.S.) was King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, a monarch of the united Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1587 to 1632, and King of Sweden (where he is known simply as Sigismund) from 1592 until he was deposed in 1599. He was the son of King John III of Sweden and his first wife, Catherine Jagellonica of Poland.

Elected to the throne of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Sigismund sought to create a personal union between the Commonwealth and Sweden (Polish–Swedish union), and succeeded for a time in 1592. After he had been deposed in 1599 from the Swedish throne by his uncle, Charles IX of Sweden, and a meeting of the Riksens ständer (Swedish Riksdag), he spent much of the rest of his life attempting to reclaim it.

Sigismund remains a highly controversial figure in Poland. His long reign coincided with the apex of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth's prestige, power and economic influence. On the other hand, it was during his reign that the symptoms of decline leading to the Commonwealth's eventual demise surfaced. Popular histories, such as the books of Paweł Jasienica, tend to present Sigismund as the principal source of these destructive processes; whereas academic histories are usually not damning of him. However, the question of whether the Commonwealth's decline was caused by Sigismund's decisions or had its roots in historical processes beyond his personal control, remains a highly debated topic.

He was commemorated in Warsaw with Zygmunt's Column, commissioned by his son and successor, Władysław IV.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Sigismund III Vasa. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Sigismund III Vasa, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).