Person:Roger the Poitevin (1)

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Roger the Poitevin
b.abt 1058 Marche, France
d.bet 1122 amd 1140
Facts and Events
Name Roger the Poitevin
Alt Name Roger Montgomery, Count of La Marche
Alt Name Lancaster Roger Montgomery The Poitevin
Gender Male
Birth[1] abt 1058 Marche, France
Marriage 1083 Poitiers, Aquitaine, Franceto Almodis de la Marche
Alt Marriage ABT. 1083 Of, , Poitou, Franceto Almodis de la Marche
Other Marriage Ending Status Divorce
with Almodis de la Marche
Death[1] bet 1122 amd 1140
Alt Death[2] 1123


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Roger the Poitevin (Roger de Poitou) was born in Normandy in the mid-1060s and died before 1140. He was an Anglo-Norman aristocrat, who possessed large holdings in both England and through his marriage in France.

He was the third son of Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel de Bellême. The appellation "the Poitevin" was for his marriage to an heiress from Poitou.

Roger acquired a great lordship in England, with lands in Salfordshire, Essex, Suffolk, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Hampshire and North Yorkshire. The principal part of the Lordship was in what was then called inter Mersam et Ripam, that is, "between the Mersey and the Ribble" and is now part of divided into Lancashire, Merseyside, and Greater Manchester. After 1090, he also assumed the title 1st Lord of Bowland.

Before 1086, he had married Almodis, daughter of Count Aldebert II of La Marche in Poitou, and sister and presumptive heiress of count Boso III who was childless and unmarried.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Roger the Poitevin. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Roger the Poitevin, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2. ROGER de Montgommery, in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.