Person:Richard de Beauchamp (1)

Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, KB
d.18 Mar 1421/22
m. ABT 1396
  1. Joan de Beauchamp
  2. Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, KB
m. 27 Jul 1411
  1. Elizabeth de Beauchamp
Facts and Events
Name Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, KB
Gender Male
Birth[1] bef 1397 Warwickshire, EnglandWarwick Castle
Marriage 27 Jul 1411 Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, Englandto Isabel le Despencer
Death[1] 18 Mar 1421/22
Burial[3] 25 Apr 1422 Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
Other?

 Not To Be Confused With?: Richard de Beauchamp (2)


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, KB (c.1394 – 18 March 1421/1422) was an English peer.

The only son of William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny, he succeeded as 2nd Baron Bergavenny at the death of his father.

He married Lady Isabel le Despenser, daughter of Thomas le Despenser, 1st Earl of Gloucester, on 27 July 1411, and great-granddaughter of Edward III. They had one child, Lady Elizabeth de Beauchamp, later 3rd Baroness Bergavenny, who married Sir Edward Nevill, later 1st Baron Bergavenny

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   Richard Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.
  3. RICHARD ([1397]-18 Mar 1422, bur 25 Apr 1422 Tewkesbury Abbey)., in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.
  4.   Cokayne, George Edward, and Vicary Gibbs; et al. The complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, extant, extinct, or dormant [2nd ed.]. (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910-59), Volume 1 pages 26 and 27.