Person:Philip of Cognac (1)

Philip of Cognac
b.early 1180s
d.aft 1201
Facts and Events
Name Philip of Cognac
Gender Male
Birth[1] early 1180s
Death[1] aft 1201


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Philip of Cognac (early 1180s – after 1201) was an illegitimate son of Richard I of England by an unidentified mother.

Philip had reached adulthood by the end of the 1190s. His father married him to his ward, Amelia, the heiress of Cognac in Charente. However, when she died without issue, Richard kept the castle, and handed it over to his seneschal, Robert of Thornham.

The king was mortally wounded during the suppression of a revolt by Viscount Aimar V of Limoges in 1199, and died without legitimate heirs. The chronicler Roger of Howden claimed that later that same year,

"Philip, illegitimate son of King Richard of England, to whom the aforesaid king his father had granted the castle and honour of Cognac, slew the previously mentioned Viscount of Limoges in vengeance for his father."

No other source corroborates this, or explicitly indicates that Aimar of Limoges's death was a violent one. However, Guiraut de Bornelh's planh (lament) for him, Planc e sospir, does suggest his death was unexpected.

A further reference to Philip is found in the Pipe Rolls for 1201 of his uncle, John of England: "Et Philippo f. R. Ricardi 1 m. de dono R." ("And to Philip, son of King Richard, one mark as a gift"), but nothing later. It seems likely that he died early in the 13th century.

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Philip of Cognac, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).