Person:Patrick Smith (1)

Patrick Smith
b.abt. 1728 of Ulster, Ireland
m. ABT 1719
  1. Capt. Abraham SmithABT 1722 - 1782
  2. Col. Daniel SmithABT 1724 - 1781
  3. Henry SmithABT 1727 - BEF 1792
  4. Patrick Smithabt 1728 - abt 1756
  5. Lt. John SmithABT 1730 - 1756
  6. Joseph SmithABT 1734 - 1756
  7. Margaret 'Louisa' Smith1741 - 1823
  8. David Smith1741 -
  9. Jonathan Smith1744 -
  10. unproven Jordan SmithBEF 1753 -
  11. William Smith1753 -
  12. James Smith1753 -
Facts and Events
Name Patrick Smith
Gender Male
Birth? abt. 1728 of Ulster, Ireland
Death[2] abt. March 1756 Killed by Indians Prior to Massacre at Ft. Vause

Patrick Smith was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Patrick Smith Killed by French/Indians in Early Augusta County, VA

An account of Patrick Smith's death at the hands of the French/Indians is in the following article: Indian Attacks of 1755-1758 in Augusta County, VA

1756, March: Patrick Smith, killed


Information on Patrick Smith

Patrick Smith a. Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758].

b. Note from Guy R.. Smith [Historian for the Col. John Smith Society]: The three sons John lost in the war were Lt. John Smith, Joseph Smith, and most likely a Patrick Smith. The State historical Library in Wisconsin has Preston Papers which summarized from 1754 to end of war the people killed Feb 1756 Chalkely Vol 2-March 1756 Robert Looney was killed (he was a neighbor of the Smith family),.. Patrick Smith was killed. He was probably born in the colonies because he was not listed in the importation papers.

References
  1.   Court records.

    ote from Guy Smith: The three sons John lost in the war: Lt. John Smith, Joseph Smith, and most likely a Patrick Smith. The State historical Library in Wisconsin has Preston Papers which summarized from 1754 to end of war the people killed Feb 1756 Chalkely Vol 2-March 1756 Robert Looney was killed (he was a neighbor of the Smith family),.. Patrick Smith was killed. He was probably born in the colonies because he was not listed in the importation papers.
    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 …to John Smith, son of brother Daniel Smith, the plantation on North River, Shanedoe, [Shenandoah ?] which testator bought of Silas Hart; to brother Daniel; to brother Abraham Smith; to brother Henry Smith. Executor, brother Daniel Smith. Proved, 18th August, 1756

    Some sources list a son of Captain John Smith named Joseph, taken prisoner at Ft. Vause along with his father. [More information is found in Smith Cousins Four compiled by Zula Wood Atwood, Frank L. Eddens, Jr, Mildred Smith Shumaker, & Guy R. Smith hereafter referred to as (CF)]

    JOHN SMITH’S FT. VAUSE ADVENTURE
    1754-1763: French and Indian War. According to the World Book Encyclopedia, that war was the last and most important conflict over French and British possessions in North America. John Smith fought under George Washington in an unsuccessful attempt to force the French to leave their chain of forts along the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania in 1754. The French forces defeated them at Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburg, Pennsylvania). That campaign was the first battle of the French and Indian War. [Jean Carr & World Book Encyclopedia]
    1755 John Smith was Captain of Rangers. His company was at Fort Vause at the head of the Roanoke River (Shawsville) in the present county of Montgomery, about ten miles from Christiansburg, Virginia. He served until 1763. (Sandra's note: This differs from the Abercrombie report which calls him Major because according to Guy Smith, John Smith was in two different military units with different ranks in each.) (CF)
    1756 May 18, 1756: Formal declaration of war by England. June 9, 1756: Formal declaration of War by France.
    Major John Smith fought at Fort Vause, Virginia, which fell to French and Indian troops under the command of Monssieur Belester, commander of the Miamee Fort (Fort Miamee is near Toledo, Ohio). Major John Smith was captured by the French and held for two years. (CF)
    The original document of the Abercrombie extract #16 will provide…illuminating historical facts…concerning Col. John Smith's Fort Vause Adventure. The original document…can be found in the Public records office in London, England…The reference number is PRO 30/8/95. [Sandra's note: Apparently, Major John Smith wrote a journal during the time he was captured and transported. He described the Forts and the French forces and numbers of guns each fort held. He also took note of each Native American tribe, their size and feelings towards the British and Americans. Major John Smith gave this information to the British to help with the war efforts. Mr. Abercrombies's letter of Nov. 16th, 1757 to Mr. Wood contains extracts from Major (John) Smith's journal, 1756/7.]
    "…Major John Smith, Commander of a Company of Rangers on the Frontiers of Virginia, was prisoner for eleven months, taken with his party of ten men in a blockhouse towards the head of James River on the 25th of June 1756 by Monsieur Belester Com.der of Miamee Fort (about 500 miles from the head of James River) at the head of 205 Indians and 25 French Canadians of which party Major Smith killed 40 (and ) obliged Captain Belester to return without penetrating [Warwick] within 60 miles from Williamsburgh where he intended. According to the information of his [Shawnee] Indians, his spies who passed through the settlements of Virginia some [months] before as Cherokees and our friends... [Abercrombie 'extract' #16 page 2 of John Smith's journal transcribed by Guy Smith]
    "Putoataways [Guy Smith's note: probably Pottawatomie (Algonquian) tribe]. …of their towns, about 2000, inclined to come over to English for better trade…took Major Smith, into their counsel as a Sachem [a supreme or Political leader], went to their king, danced under the English colours, taken from Gen'l Bradock, and fired through the French colours, held council with Major Smith, agreed with him in a project formed by him for taking Fort Dequesne by their assistance with 1500 of their people. The intimacy [between] them and the Major being suspected, he was removed. He speaks the language." [Abercrombie 'extract' #16 page 3 of John Smith's journal transcribed by Guy Smith]
    Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758].

    N

    Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758]. document provided by Guy R. Smith-- see text for more information

  2. Family histories & records.

    Monday April 3d 1758, a Memorial was read - "To the President, Council, and House of Burgesses and referred to Consideration of the House", stating that in June 1756, the said Smith then in Fort Vaufs [sic], in Augusta, was attacked by the enemy, his eldest son killed and he was captured. "He has lost three sons and a great part of his Fortune in the service of his country." [Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1752-1755, 1756-1758].

    Note from Guy Smith: The three sons John lost in the war: Lt. John Smith, Joseph Smith, and most likely a Patrick Smith. The State historical Library in Wisconsin has Preston Papers which summarized from 1754 to end of war the people killed Feb 1756 Chalkley Vol 2-March 1756 Robert Looney was killed (he was a neighbor of the Smith family),.. Patrick Smith was killed. He was probably born in the colonies because he was not listed in the importation papers.

    John Smith Jr. [son of Captain John & Margaret Smith b.1730], was killed at Fort Vause, June 25, 1756. John Smith's will P. 155 Wills--22 January, 1756 …to John Smith, son of brother Daniel Smith, the plantation on North River, Shanedoe, [Shenandoah ?] which testator bought of Silas Hart; to brother Daniel; to brother Abraham Smith; to brother Henry Smith. Executor, brother Daniel Smith. Proved, 18th August, 1756

    Patrick Smith mentioned in histories in the Collection of Guy Smith