Person:Noble Gunn (3)

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m. About 1753
  1. Daniel Gunn, III1754 - 1834
  2. Moses Gunn1756 - 1830
  3. Hezekiah Gunn1758 -
  4. Noble Gunn1760 - 1830
  5. Rhoda Gunn1762 - 1830
m. bef 1786
m. 1786
  1. Lucy Gunn1786 - 1864
  2. Charlotte Gunn1788 - 1878
  3. Abiatha GunnAbt 1790 - 1846
  4. Esther GunnAbt 1791 -
  5. Olive GunnAbt 1794 - Bef 1846
  6. Burrell GunnAbt 1798 -
  7. Noble King GunnAbt 1802 - Aft 1870
  8. Westrall Willoughby Gunn1808 - 1876
  9. Martha Ann Gunn1811 - Abt 1835
  10. William Orrin Gunn1816 - 1870
Facts and Events
Name Noble Gunn
Gender Male
Birth[8] 17 Jul 1760 Sheffield, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States
Christening[6] 17 Jul 1760 Sheffield, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States
Marriage bef 1786 to Unknown Gleason
Marriage 1786 Millerton, Dutchess, New York, United Statesjust west of Canaan, CT
to Lucy Gleason
Death[5] 24 Nov 1830 Lenox, Ashtabula, Ohio, United States

Biography

Noble's first wife dies soon after the marriage, and he then marries her sister, Lucy Gleason (1771-1843) in 1786. At the time they were residents of Canaan, Litchfield County, Connecticut, but they went to New York State, just over the line from Connecticut, to have their marriage performed. Both parents of Lucy were living at the time of her marriage. Lucy was only 15 years old when daughter Lucy was born in December 1786.

They had 10 children: Lucy, Charlotte, Abiatha, Esther, Olive, Noble King, Burrell, Westrall Willoughby, Martha Ann, and William Orrin.

Noble was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, and a report on his service appears in the Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, pages 952-953.

Military Service:

On April 21, 1775, (2 days after the event) Noble may have been among the Sheffield minutemen under the command of Col. John Fellows who were engaged in training exercises on the village green in front of the Sheffield meetinghouse before breakfast when news of the battles at Lexington and Concord arrived. By noon twenty of these men, led by Colonel Fellows, were on their way to join the army at Boston.

We know he was a soldier in Capt. Enoch Noble’s Company (his mother’s cousin), Col. John Ashley’s Regiment, the 1st Berkshire County Militia Regiment. On January 5, 1777, with other members of his Regiment, Noble enlisted in the Continental Army, joining Capt. Jenkin’s Company of Col. Samuel Brewer’s 12th Massachusetts Regiment.

Brewer’s 12th Massachusetts Regiment was assigned on August 13, 1777, to Brig. Gen. John Patterson’s 3rd Brigade at Saratoga. On August 19, General Gates took command of the 8000 American forces at Bemis Heights—pushing General Schuyler aside—and continued to fortify the area in preparation to meet the British forces coming south under the command of General Burgoyne. The first major battle occurred at Freeman’s Farm on September 19. Brewer’s Brigade, with 976 men, was located to the right wing of the American line. The battle was inconclusive, and Burgoyne launched a second attack on October 7 at Bemis Heights. The British were driven back, and on October 17 Burgoyne surrendered.

On October 27 Noble’s brigade was reassigned to the Main Continental Army, located at that time in New Jersey fighting in defense of Philadelphia. The difficult long winter at the camp at Valley Forge was about to begin.

After the conclusion of the Franco-American Alliance (6 February 1778) British forces in America had to give consideration to the new threat created by the powerful French fleet. General Clinton, who relieved Howe as British commander in America on 8 May 1778, decided to shift the main body of his troops from Philadelphia to a point nearer the coast where it would be easier to maintain close communications with the British Fleet. Consequently, he ordered evacuation of the 10,000-man garrison in Philadelphia on 18 June. As these troops set out through New Jersey toward New York, Washington broke camp at his winter headquarters in Valley Forge and began pursuit of Clinton with an army of about 13,500 men.

They caught and attacked Clinton’s army on June 28. The Battle of Monmouth was inconclusive and the British slipped away during the night. The British reported losses of 65 killed, 155 wounded, and 64 missing; the Americans listed 69 killed, 161 wounded, and 130 missing. All during 1778 and 1779 there were skirmishes throughout New Jersey, southeastern New York, and western Connecticut; but much of the action had moved south. The war won’t be officially over until February of 1783, but Noble—sick and with an injury to his knee that left him disabled for the rest of his life—will muster out of the military on December 31, 1779, a full 3 years after his enlistment

After the War:

The family lived in Litchfield County, Connecticut, for a number of years, then moved to Onondaga County, New York. In 1820 they moved to the Western Reserve in Ashtabula County, Ohio. It appears that Noble's brothers (also veterans of the War) moved west with him.

A letter dated 26 April, 1931, from E.W. Morgan, Acting Commissioner, to Dr. Norman N. Gunn, Palace Theater Building, Ashland, OH:
"He [Noble] was allowed pension on his application executed April 7, 1818, at which time he was aged fifty-six years and resided in Preble, Onondaga County, New York. In June, 1820, he had moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, in September, 1820, he had returned to Onondaga County, New York, and was residing in Marcellus, that county; in 1821, he had again returned to Ashtabula County, Ohio."

Noble is listed as one of about 33 Revolutionary soldiers living in the Towns of Marcellus and Skaneateles who applied for pensions:
"Served in Col. Samuel Brewer's regiment, under General Patterson, three years. Was fifty-eight years old in 1820, had property worth $44, and debts of $50. He said: 'I am a miller and have been lame ever since the war, in consequence of having had my knee broken in the service of the Revolution, and am not able to labor much.' He had four sons and one daughter."

He is listed in the 1820 census in Marcellus.

Noble is listed in the Census of 1830 in Lenox, Ashtabula County. He died in November of that year. His nephew, Comfort (son of Hezekiah) is listed in the 1820 census as a resident of Lenox and in the 1830 census as a resident of Ashtabula. Comfort's brother, Hezekiah, is listed in the 1840 census in Lenox (just outside of Jefferson, OH), and in the 1850 census living in Wayne Township (as was "Westrall") (page 279, 281)

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, p. 950:
Gun, Noble. Account dated Sheffield, Jan. 1, 1781, of bounties paid said Gun and others by the Selectmen to serve in the Continental Army; bounty paid said Gun for 3 months enlistment.

About 1808 living in Poland, Herkimer County, NY.

After living in Litchfield Co., CT for a number of years the family moved to Madison & then to Onondaga Co., NY. In 1820 the family moved again, this time to Ashtabula Co., OH.

N.K Gunn [son of Noble] listed in 1830 Federal Census in Lenox, Astabula County

When Noble GUNN returned to NY State from his family's new home in Lenox Twp., Ashtabula Co., OH, he stayed in Marcellus, NY. Marcellus is where Comfort GUNN and Sally WHEELER were married.

Taken from the Revolutionary War Pension Application microfilm and transcribed by Matthew Lipsey, 10 May 1998:

State of Ohio, Ashtabula County, Court of Common Pleas, June Term AD 1820
- On the 21st day of June AD 1820 -
Personally appeared in open court being a court of record for the county aforesaid Noble Gunn resident of said county aged fifty eight years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the revolutionary war as follows-to whit, three years in the company commanded by Capt. Jenkins in the regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel Brewer in the Massachusetts line on the continental establishment. That he first applied for a pension under the act of congress passed the 18th day of March 1818 on the seventh day of April 1818 and received a pension certificate numbered -6362. And I do solemnly swear that I was a resident of The United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have no since that time by gift or sale or in any other name disposed of my estate or in any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it so as to ring myself within the provision of an act of congress instilled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war passed on the 18th of March 1818 and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property or security, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed.

Schedule:
1 cow
1 pair of two year old sturs [steers ?]
2 bowls
6 chairs
1 table
1 push tub
1 small looking glass
3 wooden bowls
6 knives + forks
1 dozen plates
1 A [?]
1 kettle
6 iron spoons
5 earthen bowls
1 earthen teapot
3 tin pans
3 tin basons [sic]
1 canteen

Noble Gunn [signed]

And the said Noble Gunn on his oath aforesaid further saith that he is by occupation a Miller that through the infirmities of age he is able to labor but little being still afflicted by wounds received in the revolutionary service- that his family consists of six persons including himself, to wit, Lucy my wife aged forty eight years, who is sick and unable to [Labour - crossed out] work being afflicted with a very large swelling on her side for five or six years-a boy named Burrill aged fifteen years, [???] bodied and at times unable to labour, Westrill aged 12 years, weakly although now enjoying tour able {sic] health-Martha aged ten years-healthy-Orin aged six years healthy-and the said Noble on his oath aforesaid further saith that he is indebted to-

Nathan Munroe ________________$28.00
Nathaniel Chapman ____________$17.00
John Wright___________________$10.00

Sworn to and declared this 21st day of June AD 1820 before Timothy R. Hawley Clerk C P [signed]
In his statement, Hawley certifies that in the "opinion of the said court .... the amount and value of the property exhibited in the aforesaid schedule is sixty dollars."

References
  1.   Index , in Sheffield (Massachusetts). Town Clerk. Records of birth, marriage, and death, 1730-1810, 1843-1897: indexes to records, 1843-1897. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1961), p.44.

    Bk.1 p.116 (Original location of transcription below)[1]
    Gun, Daniel, son of Daniel Jr & wife Esther born July 26, 1754
    Gun, Moses, son of Daniel Jr & wife Esther born Apr 3, [17]56
    Gun, Hezekiah, son of Daniel Jr & wife Esther born July 15, [1758]
    [Note: Birth year follows birth pattern, but might be 1757 or 1759]
    Gun, Noble, son of Daniel Jr & wife Esther born July 17, [17]60
    Gun, Rhode, dau of Daniel Jr & wife Esther born Sept. 19, [17]62
    Gun, Daniel Jr son of Daniel Jr & wife Esther died Feb 17, [17]64

  2.   Letter from Commissioner.

    Letter dated 26 April, 1931, from E.W. Morgan, Acting Commissioner, to Dr. Norman N. Gunn, Palace Theater Building, Ashland, OH:
    "He [Noble] was allowed pension on his application executed April 7, 1818, at which time he was aged fifty-six years and resided in Preble, Onondaga County, New York. In June, 1820, he had moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, in September, 1820, he had returned to Onondaga County, New York, and was residing in Marcellus, that county; in 1821, he had again returned to Ashtabula County, Ohio."

  3.   Revolutionary Soldiers Resident or Dying in Onondaga County, N.Y., Vol. I, No. 2, p. 113, April 1912.

    by Rev. William Martin Beauchamp, Franklin Henry Chase, The Onondaga Historical Association.

  4.   Revolutionary War Pension Application.

    A microfilm, transcribed by Matthew Lipsey on 10 May 1998.
    State of Ohio, Ashtabula County, Court of Common Pleas, June Term AD 1820 - On the 21st day of June AD 1820. Includes an inventory of possessions and a list of debts owed.

  5. A Lipsey Lineage.

    A Lipsey Lineage at http://www.msu.edu/~lipsey
    https://www.msu.edu/~lipsey/html/fam00666.htm
    Here called Noble King Gunn; however, this is the middle name of Noble's son.
    Other sources give different information: One gives death on 24 October, another on 22 October in Kingsville, Ashtabula, Ohio. None give a primary source.

  6. Kellogg, Joseph M. (Joseph Mitchell). Early vital records of Sheffield, Massachusetts, 1733-1800. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1961), p. 116.

    Typescript. Lawrence, Kansas: J.M. Kellogg, no date. R. Stanton Avery Special Collections Department, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2007.)
    Also see FamilySearch: [2]

  7.   Massachusetts, United States. Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolution, pp. 950 & 952.
  8. Original record, in Sheffield (Massachusetts). Town Clerk. Town records, 1730-1843 approx. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1961), p.186.

    [3]
    Noble Gunn son of Daniel Gun junr and that which his wife Esther Bore to him was born July 17 1760.

  9.   The Official roster of the soldiers of the American Revolution buried in the state of Ohio, Vol. II. Records of Revolutionary soldiers: 1788 – To the pioneers of the Ohio Country – 1938, Page 161
    “GUNN, NOBLE, Ashtabula co
    Enl May 1777 Mass Contl servd 3 yr; mar Lucy Gleason prior to 1790; chldr: Burril (?) spelling aged 15; Estill[Westrall] 12; Martha 10; Doris 6 (ad to appl for pens 1820). In 1818 gave his ae 56; he d 10-22-1830 in Ashtabula co O whr had appld for trnsfr 9-28-1821; was a miller. Ref W 3983 Mass. Rept by State DAR.”