Person:Njord Swedes (1)

Njord Swedes, [King of]
b.abt 0214 Sweden
d.0254 Sweden
Facts and Events
Name Njord Swedes, [King of]
Alt Name Njord King Of The Swedes
Alt Name[1] King of the Swedes Njord
Alt Name Niordr
Gender Male
Birth? abt 0214 SwedenNortun
Marriage 0234 Noatun,Uppsala,Uppsala,Swedento Skadi
Death? 0254 SwedenNortun
Ancestral File Number G6SX-C4


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

In Norse mythology, Njörðr is a god among the Vanir. Njörðr is father of the deities Freyr and Freyja by his unnamed Vanr sister, was in an ill-fated marriage with the goddess Skaði, lives in Nóatún and is associated with sea, seafaring, wind, fishing, wealth, and crop fertility.

Njörðr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, in euhemerized form as a beloved mythological early king of Sweden in Heimskringla, also written by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century, as one of three gods invoked in the 14th century Hauksbók ring oath, and in numerous Scandinavian place names. Veneration of Njörðr survived into 18th or 19th century Norwegian folk practice, where the god is recorded as Njor and thanked for a bountiful catch of fish.

Njörðr has been the subject of an amount of scholarly discourse and theory, often connecting him with the figure of the much earlier attested Germanic goddess Nerthus, the hero Hadingus, and theorizing on his formerly more prominent place in Norse paganism due to the appearance of his name in numerous place names. Njörðr is sometimes modernly anglicized as Njord, Njoerd, or Njorth.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Njörðr. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners. (Genealogical Publishing Company, 1992, 2nd ed.), p. 122.
  2.   Njörðr, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  3.   The Viking Age, Gen. Hist. 19, 1:62-67.
  4.   Attarskra Bjarni Thorsteinsson, Ice FH 1, p. 435.
  5.   Odin and Descendants, Norw FH 106, Tab. 1.
  6.   The Saga Library, F Ice. 1, "Heimskringla", 1:4,14,22-24.