Person:Lovisa Smith (2)

Find records: death
Margaret 'Louisa' Smith
b.1741
m. ABT 1719
  1. Capt. Abraham SmithABT 1722 - 1782
  2. Col. Daniel SmithABT 1724 - 1781
  3. Henry SmithABT 1727 - BEF 1792
  4. Patrick Smithabt 1728 - abt 1756
  5. Lt. John SmithABT 1730 - 1756
  6. Joseph SmithABT 1734 - 1756
  7. Margaret 'Louisa' Smith1741 - 1823
  8. David Smith1741 -
  9. Jonathan Smith1744 -
  10. unproven Jordan SmithBEF 1753 -
  11. William Smith1753 -
  12. James Smith1753 -
m. ABT 1756
  1. John Bowen1757 - 1789
  2. Reece Bowen1759 - 1828
  3. Louisa 'Levicie' Bowenbef 1767 -
Facts and Events
Name Margaret 'Louisa' Smith
Alt Name Levisa Smith
Gender Female
Alt Birth? 1739 Virginia, USA
Birth? 1741
Christening[3] 6 Oct 1745 Tinkling Springs Church, , Virginia
Marriage ABT 1756 Augusta County, Virginiato Capt. Reece 'Rees' Bowen
Death? 1823 Virginia, USA

Mother's name may be Margaret Clark.

Louisa or Louvisa baptized in Tinkling Spring Church 6 Oct 1745…the wife of Rees Bowen, later killed at King's Mountain Battle. [Colonel John Smith (1701-1783) Unsung Hero of Virginia colonial Frontier by Gordon Aronhime as published in Augusta Historical Bulletin published by Augusta County, [Virginia] Historical Society Volume 14, Spring 1978 Number 1, page 5-the footnote states: "See note 2, supra; Howard M. Wilson, the Tinkling Spring, McClure, Virginia, 1954, p. 481, Draper Mss. 1 QQ 83]

Louisa: a. 1753 will of John Smith: the sd. Land to fall to my daughter Louisa

b. Boogher: A daughter, Margaret, (according to Boogher p. 330) b. 1741, married Hugh Reece Bowen, who died October 7, 1780. Gleanings of Virginia History, William Fletcher Boogher, 1903

c. Smith Cousins Four: The will names a daughter, Louisa, probably Margaret Louisa. [Smith Cousins Four compiled by Zula Wood Atwood, Frank L. Eddens, Jr, Mildred Smith Shumaker, & Guy R. Smith.]

Bowen references:

[Some of the website links are good. Some may be no longer there.]

a Hugh Bowen is found in Goodspeed's History of Giles County, Tennessee: …John Fry, William Dearing, George Malone, Gabriel and John Foulk, Daniel Harrison, John and William Rutledge, Jacob and Andrew Blythe, Joel Rutledge, Nicholas Absalom, Hugh Bowen, Thomas Moody, Andrew Pickens, John McCabe, James Angus, James Wilsford and James Brownlow settled on the Waters of Lynn Creek between 1808 and 1810...

Bowen family in Virginia: http://hometown.aol.com/jsully7/biograph.htm Captain Joseph Looney By LeRoy W. Tilton, 1949 Joseph Looney, youngest son of Robert and Elizabeth Looney, was born about 1740, perhaps just about the time that his parents removed from the home on the South Bank of the Potomac, near Hagerstown, Maryland, to the Looney's Mill Creek section on the James River in what has become the Augusta County in 1738 and was to become Botetourt County in 1770. Joseph Looney had a license to marry in Botetourt county, 25 June 1764. (Believe this Augusta Co. as Botetourt founded in 1770. E. Looney 1767). His wife was Jane Bowen, Dau. of John and Lillie Bowen. On 20 Nov. 1764, Robert Looney deeded to son Joseph Looney for 160 acres at Sinking Spring on west side of James River. Joseph Looney was a witness on 26 Dec 1767 when John Smith sold slaves to Jonathan Smith; and again a witness on 27 July 1763 to John Bowen's will… Bowen listed in Botetourt Co., Virginia abt. 1781 on this site: http://www.angelfire.com/pe/shirleyspage/mann.html This was not the total monetary value of what John Mann left his heirs, however. Included in the inventory is a list of the (illegible word) due to the estate of John Mann, deceased: John Jemison’s bond, Gabreal Smither’s bond, William Allen’s bond, Edward Willson’s bond, Francis Bowen’s bond, John Clark’s bond and Arthur Woods’ bond, for a total of 41 pounds 10 shillings 5 pence... Including the sums listed for Asa and John, the sum of the accounts totaled 16 pounds 4 shillings. This was filed by Peter Wright and James Robinson on October 20, 1781, three years after the death of John Mann.

Bowen: From Guy Smith's notes for the husband of John Smith's daughter: [Note: from the history of Robert Morris: Robert Morris used his credit to purchase barrels of flour for the Army during the Revolutionary War. In the year 1781, Mr. Morris was appointed by congress, superintendent of finance, an office then for the first time established. "certainly the Americans owed and still owe, as much acknowledgment to the financial operations of Robert Morris, as to the negotiations of Benjamin Franklin, or even the arms of George Washington. He began the Bank of America… See the website: http://www.colonialhall.com/morrisr/morrisr.asp] [John Smith] was survived by his wife, Margaret, and four sons, Abraham, Henry, Daniel and James. His daughter became the wife of the pioneer settler of Tazewell County, Rees Bowen.

[This book was sponsored by the Roanoke Historical Society -Edmund P. Goodwin, President, Roanoke, Virginia.] A daughter, Margaret, (according to Boogher p. 330) b. 1741, married Hugh Reece Bowen, who died October 7, 1780. The will names a daughter, Louisa, probably Margaret Louisa, and adds sons William, David, Jonathan, and James Jordan. The last may have been named for his mother's family. Evidently these five were the youngest children. [Note from Guy Smith: Very few Jordan in records of Augusta Co. No James Jordan.]

Boogher: A daughter, Margaret, (according to Boogher p. 330) b. 1741, married Hugh Reece Bowen, who died October 7, 1780. Gleanings of Virginia History, William Fletcher Boogher, 1903


Margaret, b.1741 m. Hugh Reece Bowen [and a lot of other info on the Smith family] I emailed Elizabeth Burns once asking her about her sources, but have since lost her email address:

<http://www.public.asu.edu/~iacexb/smith.html> by Elizabeth Burns

  • information from: Gleanings of Virginia History, William Fletcher Boogher, 1903 page 332. It has quotes taken by accounts given by a Mr. Waddell and Benjamin H. Smith, Editor of the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. A genealogy of the Smith family begins on page 330 and continues to page 372.

Settlers by the Long Grey Trail: Some Pioneers to Old Augusta County Virginia and Their Descendants, of the Family of Harrisons and Allied Lines. · AUTHOR: J. Houston Harrison · PUBLICATION: 665p, C.J. Carrier Co., Harrisonburg VA 1935, reprint 1983.

EMAIL to Judy Anderson, descendant of Lovisa Smith Bowen written 21 Aug 2004: I have been going through the reams of documents that Guy Smith has sent to me. He had sent me a copy of a GenForum query posted 1 Jul 1999 by a Jennie Frazier with a typewritten transcript of the documents you have scanned. It looks like it originally came from YOU!! : ) The query says: Dear Christine, Attached is the information I received from Judy Anderson who has written a comprehensive book on the Thompson/Wards of VA and TN. After going over the claims and their denial, we have come to the conclusion that it may well have been a scam, trying to extract free lands. But you never know.... Back to the Commission papers I'm sending you. They all sound alike, as if rehearsed. That could be simply because they all decided to focus on one approach and have nothing to do with any kind of fraud. The other way to look at it, is they all conspired to say the same thing. And more or less, that's the way the Commission looked at it. They wondered WHY, if such a known fact within the family, they had never sought to prove the heritage until money or land was available to collect. A question, I myself wonder about. But you read the information and draw your own conclusions...(she then writes about being a California girl and finding cousins) Sooo, you can see why I'm overjoyed to find one willing to research this objectively. Will be anxiously waiting to hear from you. Sincerely, Cousin Jennie [then there are typed pages of the Affidavits in support of Rees Bowen Ward and his application for citizenship in Indian Territory, Cherokee Nation.]


Guy Smith wrote no comments on the papers which is unusal for him, so I wrote to him to ask him his opinion. I will not be sending the letter until Monday, since I need to go to work soon and I have missed the mail. I sent him a LOT of questions I had not even looked at the typescript before this morning when I was writing to Guy Smith, so I didn't know anything about the application for the Cherokee Nation until we spoke the other day. I have my doubts, because of other experiences I have had with my great great grandmother's descendants who only wanted the money and the land and did commit some fraud to try to make the application seem correct. There are stories in the family of a kidnapping, but the timing doesn't fit. The application by her descendants was also denied for the same reasons as Lovisa Smith Bowen's descendants' applications. The only way for me to figure things out is to put all the documentation together. Here is what I have put together in my note to Guy: 5. Louvisa/Margaret Louisa Smith Bowen I found a descendant of her this week. She has some of the original documents of the application of her descendants to certify her as a Cherokee Indian. You had sent me the GenForum papers of another of her descendants who had posted a query with the typescript of those papers. What do you think about that claim? I told the descendant that there are MANY Americans (including some of my other lines) who have made the same claim. One relative on my other line even sent me a fake photo of my ancestor, but I have a real one. He stopped writing to me when I asked for his sources. Both John Smith and Margaret imported from Ireland, proven in 1740, so Lovisa could not have been a Cherokee as their child: John Smith made oath that he imported himself, Margaret his wife, Abraham, Henry, Daniel, John & Joseph Smith & Robert Mc Dowel, as his own Charges from Ireland to Philadelphia & from thence into this Colony & that this is the first time of his proving his & their rights in order to obtain land.---(Orange County, Virginia Order Book II, Circuit Court of Orange County, Orange, Virginia, 1740 p. 205) Louisa is listed in John Smith's 1753 will, so she had to be in the family at that time and accepted as a full daughter: "IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN— I John Smith of Augusta County and Colony of Virginia… do make this my Last will and testament… first of all I Leave to Margaret my well beloved wife all my Stock of Horses and Cattle Household Goods and all my Movables Whatsoever She shall also make Choice of any one Tract of Land that I have which She is to hold During her Life and at her Death the sd. Land to fall to my daughter Louisa… In order for Louvisa/Margaret Louisa to be Cherokee: (1) She could have been adopted, but I don't know how common that was in those times to adopt a Cherokee child and if an adopted child would have inherited land. If my memory serves me correctly in the Abercrombie Extracts you sent me, John Smith was familiar with some Native American languages, so perhaps it is possible, but I'm not sure it is probable. (2) She was illegitimate. But, I don't think she would have been listed in Col. John Smith's will. And I don't think that she would have been baptized and on the records. IS THIS CORRECT? Have you seen any originals of this record?: Louisa or Louvisa baptized in Tinkling Spring Church 6 Oct 1745…the wife of Rees Bowen, later killed at King's Mountain Battle. [Colonel John Smith (1701-1783) Unsung Hero of Virginia colonial Frontier by Gordon Aronhime as published in Augusta Historical Bulletin published by Augusta County, [Virginia] Historical Society Volume 14, Spring 1978 Number 1, page 5-the footnote states: "See note 2, supra; Howard M. Wilson, the Tinkling Spring, McClure, Virginia, 1954, p. 481, Draper Mss. 1 QQ 83]

References
  1.   Will, 1753.

    JOHN SMITH - Will of 1753 Copied from: Settlers by the Long Grey Trail
    A contribution to: The History and Genealogy of Colonial Families of Rockingham County, Virginia
    by J. Houston Harrison C. J. Carrier Company Harrison burg, Virginia 1975
    Page 199:
    "It has been well said that the Harrisons of Rockingham were intimately connected with the Smiths. Reference here is to the family of the immigrant Capt. John Smith, some account of whom has been given, and the accidental finding of whose will among the unindexed records at Staunton has been noted. (See pp. 8, 37, 86, 141). This will, in the original, was written on a single sheet of paper on the back of which occurs the notation: "John Smith Senr. Will," is dated May 7, 1753, and reads as follows-

    "IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN-
    I John Smith of Augusta County and Colony of Virginia being very Sick in Body but in my perfect Sences do make this my Last will and testament first of all I Leave to Margaret my well beloved wife all my Stock of Horses and Cattle Household Goods and all my Movables Whatsoever She shall also make Choice of any one Tract of Land that I have which She is to hold During her Life and at her Death the sd. Land to fall to my daughter Louisa I also Constitute and appoint Daniel Harrison Silas Hart and my son Abraham Smith to be my Executors and it is my will that they Shall Sell all or so much of my Land Excepting the above Tracts as will Pay all of my Debts and funeral Charges and what Ever of my Land Remains un sold to pay of my Debts to be Divided Equally between my sons William Joseph David Jonathan and James Jordan my Executors to Pay five Shillings Each to my Sons Abraham Henry Daniel and John & I Do hereby Revoke make null and void all other wills made by me before this Date and hereby Pronounce and Publickly Declare this to be my Last Will and Testament in Witness whereof I have Hereunto Set my hand an Seal this Seventh Day of May on Thousand Seven Hundred & Fifty Three- "In Presents of James Patton, Robt. Renick, Humphrey Madison
    "Jno. Smith (seal)
    (See original wills, Box 3, Staunton, Virginia) [Note: John Smith had at least 2 wills. This one dated 1753 and a final one dated April 26, 1779.]

    "The signature of Capt. Smith is in a very bold hand.

    The seal is of red wax bearing embossed on it the figure of a "horn of Plenty," out of which pours a "fleur-de-lis", and water (?), onto a sprig, or branch of a vine, placed underneath, and a curved as an inverted rainbow. The fleur-de-lis was the Royal emblem of France, and is also the same for a species of iris. Probably the vine of the seal alludes to the latter, particularly as the iris of mythology was associated with the rainbow. In one way or another the fleur-de-lis occurs frequently in the arms of Smith families. Its significance pouring from a horn of plenty would seem to be evident. On the Arms of Richard Smith, the Smithtown, Long Island, immigrant, the fleur-de-lis was a prominent figure. (See p. 37)….
    Note from Guy Smith-the seal is reversed in this image.

    "The will is interesting, in that it mentions more children than appear to have heretofore been credited to Capt. Smith. At the proving of his importation at Orange (see p. 8), he included his wife Margaret, and sons Abraham, Henry, Daniel, John, and Joseph. Of these Abraham, b. in Ulster, Ireland, 1722, m. Sarah Caldwell, of Augusta County; Daniel, b. in Ulster, 1724, m. about 1751, Jane, the daughter of Capt. Daniel Harrison; Henry, b. 1727, m. Camey ___ [Amy/Amey/Amelia-various spellings from land records]; John Jr., born 1730, was killed at Ft. Vause, June 25, 1756; and Joseph, born 1734, in Chester County, Pennsylvania (?), was captured with his father at Ft. Vause, June 25, 1756, and died a prisoner on the way to [Canada]. A daughter, Margaret, (according to Boogher p. 330) b. 1741, married Hugh Reece Bowen, who died October 7, 1780. The will names a daughter, Louisa, probably Margaret Louisa, and adds sons William, David, Jonathan, and James Jordan. The last may have been named for his mother's family. Evidently these five were the youngest children.
    [Note from Guy Smith: Very few Jordan in records of Augusta Co. No James Jordan.]

    The seal and signature are from Guy R. Smith historian for the Col. John Smith Society.

    JOHN SMITH - Will of 1753-- names wife and children-- see text
    Copied from: Settlers by the Long Grey Trail--document provided by Guy R. Smith -- A daughter, Margaret, (according to Boogher p. 330) b. 1741, married Hugh Reece Bowen, who died October 7, 1780. The will names a daughter, Louisa, probably Margaret Louisa.

  2.   Book, 1753.

    Louisa or Louvisa baptized in Tinkling Spring Church 6 Oct 1745…the wife of Rees Bowen, later killed at King's Mountain Battle.
    [Colonel John Smith (1701-1783) Unsung Hero of Virginia colonial Frontier by Gordon Aronhime as published in Augusta Historical Bulletin published by Augusta County, [Virginia] Historical Society Volume 14, Spring 1978 Number 1, page 5-the footnote states: "See note 2, supra; Howard M. Wilson, the Tinkling Spring, McClure, Virginia, 1954, p. 481, Draper Mss. 1 QQ 83]

    Colonel John Smith (1701-1783) Unsung Hero of Virginia colonial Frontier by Gordon Aronhime as published in Augusta Historical Bulletin published by Augusta County, [Virginia] Historical Society Volume 14, Spring 1978 Number 1, page 5]

  3. Book.

    Louisa or Louvisa baptized in Tinkling Spring Church 6 Oct 1745…the wife of Rees Bowen, later killed at King's Mountain Battle.
    [Colonel John Smith (1701-1783) Unsung Hero of Virginia colonial Frontier by Gordon Aronhime as published in Augusta Historical Bulletin published by Augusta County, [Virginia] Historical Society Volume 14, Spring 1978 Number 1, page 5-the footnote states: "See note 2, supra; Howard M. Wilson, the Tinkling Spring, McClure, Virginia, 1954, p. 481, Draper Mss. 1 QQ 83]

    Colonel John Smith (1701-1783) Unsung Hero of Virginia colonial Frontier by Gordon Aronhime as published in Augusta Historical Bulletin published by Augusta County, [Virginia] Historical Society Volume 14, Spring 1978 Number 1, page 5]