Person:Lodowick Abshire (1)

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Lodowick 'Ludwig' Abshire
b.abt. 1736
d.12 November 1822 Franklin County, Virginia
m. 1725
  1. Christian Abshireest 1732 -
  2. William Abshire1734 - 1804
  3. Lodowick 'Ludwig' Abshireabt 1736 - 1822
  4. John Abshireabt 1744 -
  5. Abraham Abshireabt 1755 - 1842
m. abt. 1762
  1. Peter Abshire1765 - 1853
  2. John Abshire1769 - 1821
  3. Jacob Abshire1774 - 1864
Facts and Events
Name Lodowick 'Ludwig' Abshire
Gender Male
Birth? abt. 1736
Marriage abt. 1762 Virginiato Christina McGrady
Death? 12 November 1822 Franklin County, Virginia

Lodowick Abshire was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Early Land Acquisition in Augusta County, VA

Disposition of Land from Chalkley's:


  • Page 326.--8th March, 1763. Ludwick Ipsher, eldest son and heir of Peter Ipsher, deceased, to Israel Christian, £50, 200 acres by patent to Peter, 29th May, 1760, on John's Creek of Craig's Creek. Teste: Wm. Carvin, Thos. Barnes, Ludwick ( ) Ipsher.


Information on Lodowick Abshire

From "Boones Mill, Franklin County, Virginia", by Howard D. Abshire:


The Lodowick or Luke Absher (Abshire) family was the first white settlers in this region which in those days was called Bedford County, Virginia. Named after the Duke of Bedford this area where the early Abshire's settled is located on the rolling meadows south of Windy Gap Mountain. From the native forest they built small log cabins, which usually were one story, although some were two stories high. The window, which let in some sunlight, was made of greased animal skins. The door usually faced south and the chimney to the north. The door facing and the sills were usually marked by notching the shadows of the sun. This was their timepiece. All cooking was done on the open hearth fireplace. These pioneer homes were usually located two or three hundred feet from a fresh water spring.