Person:Llywelyn the Great (1)

Llywelyn the Great
Facts and Events
Name Llywelyn the Great
Alt Name Llywelyn Fawr ab Iorwerth
Alt Name Llywelyn I , of Wales
Alt Name Llywelyn ap Iorwerth , Prince of North Wales
Gender Male
Birth[1][12][13] 1173 Dolwyddelan, Caernarvonshire, WalesAberffraw Castle
Marriage abt 1191 Wales  Cohabitation without marriage formalities?  
to Tanglwy verch Llywarch
Alt Marriage bef 23 Mar 1205 to Joan , of England, Lady of Wales
Marriage 1206 to Joan , of England, Lady of Wales
Alt Marriage aft 16 Apr 1205 Chester, Cheshire, EnglandSt. Werburgh Benedictine Abbey
to Joan , of England, Lady of Wales
Death[1][14][15][16] 11 Apr 1240 Conwy, Caernarvonshire, Wales
Burial? Aberconwy Abbey, Conwy, Caernarvonshire, Wales


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Llywelyn the Great, full name Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, (c. 117211 April 1240) was a Prince of Gwynedd in north Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for 40 years.

During Llywelyn's boyhood, Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who split the kingdom between them, following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd, in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200 and made a treaty with King John of England that year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's natural daughter Joan in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208, Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210, relations deteriorated, and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all lands east of the River Conwy, but was able to recover them the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign the Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216, he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor, Henry III, in 1218. During the next fifteen years, Llywelyn was frequently involved in fights with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career, as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240 and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Llywelyn the Great. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Llywelyn the Great, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   The Royal LInes of Succession, A16A225, p. 23.
  3.   Dict. of Nat'l Biog., Eng. Pub. A, v. 23, p. 7-13.
  4.   Eminent Welshmen, Wales 13.
  5.   Ped. of Angl. & Carn. Fam., Wales Angl. 1, p. 309.
  6.   Douglas Richardson. Plantagenet Ancestry. (2004, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, MD), p.742.
  7.   Some Descents of Llywelyn the Great.

    Llwelyn the Great

  8.   Alison Weir. Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy. (Name: rev. ed, Pimlico Random House, London 1989, 1996;), p 71.

    no parents

  9.   Frederick Lewis Weis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760. (Name: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992;), line 236 p 201, line 176 p 151.
  10.   Sharon Kay Penman. Here Be Dragons. (Name: Ballantine Books, New York 1985;).
  11.   Brian Tompsett, Dept of Computer Science. University of Hull Royal Database (England). (Name: copyright 1994, 1995, 1996;).
  12. Brian Tompsett, Dept of Computer Science. University of Hull Royal Database (England). (Name: copyright 1994, 1995, 1996;).

    b 1173

  13. Frederick Lewis Weis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760. (Name: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992;), line 176 p 151.

    b 1173, no place

  14. Some Descents of Llywelyn the Great.

    d 1240

  15. Brian Tompsett, Dept of Computer Science. University of Hull Royal Database (England). (Name: copyright 1994, 1995, 1996;).

    d 1240

  16. Frederick Lewis Weis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760. (Name: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992;), line 176 p 151.

    no place

  17.   Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.
  18.   LLYWELYN ap Iorwerth, son of IORWERTH "Drwyndwyn/flat nose" Prince of Gwynedd & his wife Marared of Powys (1173-11 Apr 1240[250], bur Aberconway), in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.
  19.   Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, in Welsh Biography Online.
  20.   Gruffudd ap Cynan 4, in Bartrum, Peter C. (Peter Clement). Welsh genealogies, AD 300-1400. (Wales: University of Wales Press, c1980).
  21.   Baldwin, Stewart. Llywelyn ap Iorwerth ancestor table. (GEN-MEDIEVAL/soc.genealogy.medieval), Generation 1.
  22.   The Dictionary of National Biography indicated Gwenllian, child #3 married William de Lacy and was the daughter of Llewelyn by Tanglwyst. Some of the less reliable sources indicate she was the daughter of Llewelyn by Joan, Princess of England and that she married Robert de Lacy. See also notation on the family group record of the above Gwladys with her first husband, Reginald de Braose.