Person:Katherine Neville (13)

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Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings
d.bef. 22 Nov 1503
Facts and Events
Name Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings
Alt Name Catherine
Gender Female
Birth[1] 1442 Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Marriage 1462 Salisbury, Wiltshire, England"1462-02-06"?
to William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings
Death[1] bef. 22 Nov 1503
Alt Death? 25 Mar 1504 Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire, England
Other? House of Neville


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings (1442 – between January and 25 March 1504), was a noblewoman and a member of the powerful Neville family of northern England. She was one of the six daughters of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and the sister of military commander Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, known to history as Warwick the Kingmaker.

She was married twice. By her first husband William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington of Aldingham, she was the mother of Cecily Bonville, who became the wealthiest heiress in England following the deaths in the Battle of Wakefield of Katherine's husband, her father-in-law; and less than two months later, of William Bonville's grandfather, William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville who was executed following the Yorkist defeat at the Second Battle of St Albans. Katherine's second husband was William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, a powerful noble who was beheaded in 1483 on the order of King Richard III, who placed Katherine directly under his protection.

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   Katherine Neville, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.