Person:John Walker (81)

m. 7 JAN 1701/02
  1. Elizabeth Walker1703 - 1787
  2. John Walker, III1705 - 1776
  3. James Walker1706/07 - 1793
  4. Thomas Walker1709 - ABT 1710
  5. William Walker1711 - ABT 1712
  6. Jane Walker1712 - 1793
  7. Samuel Walker, of Natural Bridge1714 - 1793
  8. Alexander Walker1716 - ABT 1784
  9. Esther Walker1720 - ABT 1721
  10. Joseph Walker1722 - 1806
  11. Mary Walker1724 - bef 1755
  • HJohn Walker, III1705 - 1776
  • WAnn Houstonest 1715 - 1770
m. 20 Mar 1734
  1. John Walker, IVest 1735 - abt 1817
  2. Catherine "Hetty" Walkerest 1737 - Aft 1770
  3. Susanna Walker1739 -
  4. Martha Walkerest 1741 -
  5. Ann Walkerest 1743 - aft 1784
  6. Mary Walkerest 1745 - 1792
  7. Samuel Walkerest 1747 - 1778
  8. Margaret Walkerest 1754 - abt 1818
  9. Jane Walkerest 1756 - 1806
Facts and Events
Name John Walker, III
Gender Male
Birth[1] Mar 1705 Wigtown, Wigtownshire, Scotland
Marriage 20 Mar 1734 Chester County, Pennsylvaniato Ann Houston
Death[3] c1776 Washington, Virginia, United States
Will? 23 SEP 1778 Will proved - Washington County, Virginia - will book I, 1768-1800, pg. 31
__________________________


Contents


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Index
YDNA. Walker
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……………………..The Tapestry
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New River SWVP Cumberland Carolina Cradle
The Smokies Old Kentucky



Sources

Source:White, 1902
Transcript:Will of John Walker III of Washington County, VA, c1773
Transcript:Survey for Broad Meadows, Donnell et al, 300 ac, Washington County VA, 1787
List of Records for John Walker in Chalkley's Chronicles

Related

Notes. John Walker III
Notes. Land Transactions
Land holding companies in Va, Mo, and the Ohio

Overview

"Broadmeadows", Property of John Walker III at the Sinks of Sinking Creek, settled c1771, Washingotn County,VA. Photograph by the late Jerry Penley, used by permission. Image:Survey for Broad Meadows, Donnell et al, 300 ac, 1787.jpg
John Walker III of the Wigton line was born in Wigton Scotland, in 1705. He moved, with his parents, John Walker II (c1682-1734) and Katherine Rutherford (c1681-1738), about 1710 from Wigton to Newry Ireland. About 1726 the family emigrated to America, settling near Rising Sun, Cecil County MD. Here John III married Ann Houston in 1734, and migrated to the Valley of Virginia, probably between 1734 and 1738. During the French and Indian War (1754-1763) he, along with many others, left the area for North Carolina, settling in Orange County about 1756. Toward the end of his life John III made one final relocation, this time moving to southwest Virginia about 1771. Here he settled "at the Sinks" (which was later given a plantation name of "Broadmeadows") between Castles Woods, and Dungannon, in modern Scott County, Virginia. He died there between 1773 and 1778. Much of the data for this article is ultimately based on Source:White, 1902 descendants of John Walker of Wigton Scotland. See:Timeline for John Walker (81).
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Approximate location of the property that eventually came to be called "Broad Meadows". John Walker IV inherited this property from his father, and sold it about 1786 to John Donnell and others, who were buyingup property in the area, and commonly designated their property with "Plantations Names", following a colonial practice common in Pennsylvania, but not routinely used in Southwest Virginia. This mapping is based on their property survey of 1787, as plotted using "DeedPlatter]. Platting these co-oordinates shows a slight error in closure, indicating that at least one of the coordinates is in (slight) error in the original survey. The property has been placed as closely as possible to match the geophysical description as closely as possible. While the locaiton of "spurs" and "ridges" would not have changed over the last 250 years, the course of Cowans Creek and Sinking Creek may have changed, especially since this is bottom land. Note that the fixing of the precise location of the property is very dependant on aligning the various property lines with the location of these streams. As a result the placement of this property, while close to its proper location, is somewhat debatable.

Also shown on this diagram are the locations of Porters Fort and Porters Mill. These properties were owned by Patrick Porter, soninlaw of John Walker III. Remanants of the Mill survive to this day, and its precise location is well known. The location of Porter's Fort is less precisely known, but is presumed to have lain close to the location shown here. "Hunters Ford" is also shown, though the location is very approximate. Early hunters (e.g., The Long Hunters in the area crossed the Clinch at this point, long before settlers first came to the area about 1769. They followed the "Hunters Trail" which passed through the area from Roanoke, passing south into Powells Valley, and eventually through the Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. When Boone took his family to Kentucky for the first time in 1774, it is almost certain that they crossed the Clinch at Hunters Ford. Later this ford would become known as Osborn's FOrd after the family that owned the property.

Vita

White 1902 is our only known source of information about the Wigton Walker line prior to their appearance on Borden's Grant about 1738. White 1902 identifies John Walker III as the eldest son of John Walker II (c1682-1734) and Katherine Rutherford (c1681-1738). No primary record has been identified that would support, or refute, this information. This datum is broadly accepted simply because we have nothing better to go on for John Walker III.

EntrySource/Basis/Commentary
DOB: March 1705, White 1902:6; White 1902:3 tells us that his parents married in Wigton Scotland, on 7 January 1702. A DOB of 1705, and a POB of Wigton, is consistent with this information.
POB: probably in Wigton, Scotland
DOD: c1775 John III's will was probated in 1778. Many use 1778 as his DOD, but the probability is that he died well before this date. The first probate records in Washington County are for 1778, when a substantial number of estates were processed. The flurry of probates that occurred in that year included the estate of both John and his son Samuel. John's will makes a specific bequest to his son Samuel. Samuel is believed to have died in July of 1776, , which suggests that John died about 1775. It is, of course, possible that John did not revise his will after Samuel's death, but it seems more likely that John predeceased his son.
POD: near Castle's Woods, VA. We can guess that he died at home on Sinking Creek where he owned property that ws later known as "Broad Meadows". This is just east of Fall Creek where soninlaw Person:Patrick Porter (1) established his home and mill.
Burial: There are no known data that seem to speak to the question of where John III was buried. It seems likely that he was buried either on his own property on Sinking Creek near Castle's Woods, or perhaps at the Porter family cemetery on Fall Creek, on the property of his son-in-law, Patrick Porter.
Spouse: Ann Houston (c1705-c1765)
DOM: March 1734 White 1902:6
POM: Old Chester Co, PA/Cecil County MD Ann was probaby living with her brother Samuel Houston, who is described in the record of his will as a "farmer of East Nottingham". It is likely that the marriage either occurred in East Nottingham, in Old Chester Co, PA, or in adjacent West Nottingham, where the Nottingham Presbyterian Church was located near the modern community of Rising Sun, Cecil Co. MD.
Father: John Walker II (c1682-1734)
Mother: Katherine Rutherford (c1681-1738)

Lineage

The White Descendancy Table shows the early ancestry of the Wigton Walker line, as described by White 1902. The Wigton Walker Family per White 1902. White 1902:6 identifies John III as the eldest son, and second child, of John Walker II (c1682-1734) and Katherine Rutherford (c1682-1738). This relationship is not questoned, but we have no primary source of information that support it. Also provided is an index to the male lines of the Wigton Walkers as defined by White, 1902
John Walker I (191)
Person:Alexander Walker (14) John Walker II (190)
Gunstocker
John 217
Sawney
Wheelwright
Alexander 26
John III 81 James 126 Samuel 41 Samuel 55
the Orphan
Alexander 28 Joseph 55 Thomas
(81) X
William
(177) X

Joseph 79
Alexander 16
James 122
John 220
Samuel 64
Andrew 12
William 176 .
.

John 249
Joseph 71 X
.
.
.
.
.
.

John IV (149)
Samuel 49 .
.
.
.
.
.
.

John 211 .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Samuel 42
James 114
John 202
Joseph 51
Joel 5
.
.
.

James 164
Samuel 68
.
.
.
.
.
.

John 207
William 172
James 120
Alexander 24 X
Joseph 60
Alexander 27
Joseph 60
David 31

William 198 X
John 258 X
Joseph 50
James 127
Samuel 47
.
.
.

Most, but not all, Walkers in Chalkley's Chronicles can be traced to the Wigton Walker line as describe by White 1902. The above is a Summary of Male Descendancy of the Wigton Walker line, based on White, 1902. This includes the Walkers Creek and Natural Bridge lineages. Also included is thethe lines of Samuel the Orphan, known to be related to the Line of John III by YDNA, but also known not to be related to the line of Samuel of Natural Bridge. Not currently shown are the lines of, Alexander the Orphan, and the Letterkenney Walkers, all of which share the Walkers Creek YDNA signature with John III and Samuel the Orphan.) Entries marked "X", indicate individuals who are believed to have "died young", died without children, or about whom nothing is known.



Child List

Name DOB POB DOD POD Spouse DOM POM< Notes
Susanna Walker (4) 1736 c1815 Person:Patrick Porter (1) (1731-1806)
Mary Walker (211) abt. 1743 after 1803 person:Andrew Cowan (4) See Note below. Date of death is simply a guess; White 1902 identifies Mary's husband as Andrew Cowan. Many Cowan researchers believe him to be Person:Andrew Cowan (5) who appears later in Jefferson County, TN Apart from his role as a "Gentleman Justice" for Washington County, personal records for Andrew are very sparse, and his fate is not certain. However, it is now known that he continued to serve as a gentleman Justice in Washington County until well after the appearance of Andrew Cowan (5) in Jefferson County. Presumably both he and Mary died in Washington County. See Analysis:Identity of Andrew Cowan of Castle's Woods
person:Jane Walker (34) Est. 1747-1755 1806 Blount County, TN person:William Cowan (12) (1750-1809)
Catherine Walker (20) c.1738 c1772 Robert Bell (1736-1816) White 1902 identifies her as "Hetty". Research by the late Jerry Penley (?-2006) and Dan Welch, suggests strongly that she is the Catherine Walker who married Robert Bell in Orange Co, NC., c. 1759. This would give her a DOB of about 1738. Catharine died in North Carolina before the death of her father John III. This explains the bequest to a granddaughter "Ann Bell" in John III's will.
John Walker IV aka "Indian Killer" c1734 c1817 Miss Long
Samuel Walker (49) abt. 1744 1776 Never married Probate records for Samuel's estate identify John Walker (his brother) as "heir at law", indicating that Samuel was not married at the time of his death.
Person:Margaret Walker (1) abt. 1742 abt. 1818 Person:John Snoddy (1)
Person:Ann Walker (13) person:Samuel Cowan (1)
Martha Walker (44) bef. 1743 Alexander Montgomery

Family

According to White 1902 John Walker II immigrated from Wigton Scotland (modern Wigtown in Wigtonshire), to Newry, Ireland about 1710, and then from Newry to America in 1726. The family settled near the community now known as Rising Sun, Cecil County Maryland. John III and Ann married about 1734, and moved in succession to Borden's Grant (roughly modern Rockbridge County, VA) about 1738, then to Orange County, NC about 1756, and finally, about 1771, to Castle's Woods in modern Scott County, VA. the following sections summarizes what we know about the family of John III in these locations. A survey of known records related to John III, is provided in the records section. Please note that it is not always possible to identify records that mention a "John Walker" as pertaining to John III of the Wigton Walker line. For the moment this summary errors on the side of caution, and includes ANY mention of John Walker in the local records, including some that undoubtedly refer to another individual.

Rising Sun

Location of Rising Sun, Cecil Co, MD
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Location of Rising Sun, Cecil Co, MD

John III's parents settled near the modern community of Rising Sun, Cecil County, MD, about 1726. Their eldest son, John III, would have been 20 years of age at the time.

This area, at the time considered to be within Chester Co. PA, included the tract of land known as the "Nottingham Lots", first settled around the turn of the century by Quakers. The Walkers probably settled somewhere on the Nottingham Lots. Their stay in the area was relatively short. By 1734 John II began preparations for a move to the Valley of Virginia where new lands were opening up, especially on a tract known as Beverly's Manor. White 1902 tells us that his eldest son, John III, married Ann Houston in that same year, and it seems likely that this marrige was preparatory for the move to Virginia. John III would have been 29 year of age at the time. The marriage is thought to be confirmed by the reference to Ann as "Ann Walker", in the will of her brother Samuel, probated in 1739. This is virtually the only known evidence for the presence of the Wigton line on the Nottingham Lots. (See discussion of marriage data, above).

Borden's Grant

Rockbridge Co. VA
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Rockbridge Co. VA

It is clear from White 1902:6 that she believed that John III moved about from the Nottingham Lots to Walkers Creek on Borden's Grant about 1734. This is difficult to reconcile with other information provided by White, and with known records for Borden's Grant. First, we know from court testimony of Mrs. Greenlee (former wife of John McDowell who did Borden's intitial survey work) [need reference to court case, and/or extract] that there were no settlers present on Borden's Grant when she and her husband arrived in 1737. Thus, if John III settled in the general area in 1734 it was probaby further north on Beverley's Manor, which was in fact settled beginning 1734, or even further north in the Valley of Virginia. In addition, White tells us that John III's son-in-law, Robert Campbell, settled in 1734 near Staunton, which would place him on Beverly's Manor. If that is the case, we can probably expect that John III settled not too far distant from his son-in-law. [Record check needed].

John Walker, Sr.'s land (Borden Tract NW, 213 acres - 1743 & 190 acres - 1753) as shown on the map meticulously drawn by J.R. Hildebrand, cartographer. This map is copyrighted©, used by permission of John Hildebrand, son of J.R. Hildebrand, April, 2009.  Note land of other Walker family members neighboring John Walker's land: Alexander Walker (John's brother) 161 acres, 1743; James Walker (John's brother) 321 acres, 1743; and John Walker, Jr. (John's son) 302 acres, 1753
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John Walker, Sr.'s land (Borden Tract NW, 213 acres - 1743 & 190 acres - 1753) as shown on the map meticulously drawn by J.R. Hildebrand, cartographer. This map is copyrighted©, used by permission of John Hildebrand, son of J.R. Hildebrand, April, 2009. Note land of other Walker family members neighboring John Walker's land: Alexander Walker (John's brother) 161 acres, 1743; James Walker (John's brother) 321 acres, 1743; and John Walker, Jr. (John's son) 302 acres, 1753

At the same time it does appear that when Borden's Grant opened for settlement in 1738, some of the Wigton Walkers were among the earliest settlers. Chalkley's provides a list of deeds issued by Benjamin Borden after 1744 (prior deeds are located in Orange County, VA deed records). That list includes:

  • John Walker, 15th April, 1743 - 213 acres (in Orange County, VA deed records)
  • Alexander Walker, 14th April, 1743 - 161 acres (in Orange County, VA deed records)
  • James Walker, 14th April, 1743 - 321 acres (in Orange County, VA deed records)
  • John Walker, Jr., 19 March, 1753 - 302 acres (in Chalkley's)
  • John Walker, Sr., 21st Sept., 1754 - 190 acres (in Chalkley's)

This last 190 acre tract (no doubt acquired for speculative purposes) was leased to Andrew Duncan in 1756 in the following transaction listed in Chalkley's:

:Page 374. - 18 Nov. 1756, John Walker and wife Ann (X) to Andrew Duncan, lease of 190 acres (release for £100), part of estate of Benjamin Borden decd, west side of Walkers Creek, James Mores' corner. Wit. Robert Patrick, James Trimble.

Later in 1760, Andrew Duncan apparently sub-leased it to Samuel Lindsey in the following transaction listed in Chalkley's:

:Page 390. - 18 Aug. 1760, Andrew Duncan (and Jean (X) Duncan) to Samuel Lindsey, lease (release for £100.10), 190 acres west side Walkers Creek, corner Alexander Walker, Js. Moores corner. No wit.


In addition, the following land acquisitions are also in Chalkley's:

  • John Walker, Sr., 2nd August, 1753 - 112 acres on Mudlick Run and joining on a branch of Roanoke called Goose Creek.
  • John Walker, Sr., 3rd August, 1753 - 359 acres on Mudlick Run on Roanoke, otherwise called Goose Creek, from William Martin.
Note: the second acquistion appears in the following Chalkley's record:

* OCTOBER 15, 1765. (4) Thos. Woddell and 545 acres added to tithables. John Buchanan and two others and 513 acres added to tithables. Alexander and John Walker and 359 acres added to tithables.

Land records for Bordens Grant have been used to create a composite mapping of various parcels at (Berry Site Url)

Figure A focuses on the area in the Walkers Creek watershed, and pinpoints the location of various paracels of interest, including those listed above. Four Walkers are shown along the west bank of Walkers Creek, beginning just about two miles above its confluence with Hays Creek and extending to a point just below the confluence. They are, in order from north to south:
Walker Holdings on Walkers Creek, Borden's Grant, from Berry Website, 2006
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Walker Holdings on Walkers Creek, Borden's Grant, from Berry Website, 2006
  1. John Walker 1743 214 acres
  2. Alexander Walker 1743 161 acres
  3. James Walker 1743 321 acres[4]
  4. John Walker 1754 190 acres

Based on their dates, the first two parcels are seen as correspond with the first two tracts taken from Chalkley. The third tract for James Walker does not match the one listed by Chalkley for a person by that name, as the dates are widely divergent. However, we know from another record in Chalkley that Alexander Walker transferred a parcel of land on Walkers Creek to his son James. That James would not have been of age in 1743. It seems likely that this tract was aquired by James Walker (1707 - ?) son of John II, and brother of John III. [need link to the record from Chalkley]. A possible explanation of this is that the James Walker of 1743 died or left the area sometime prior to 1773, and that his cousin Alexander acquired the property, living next door eventually transferred it to his own son James.

The final parcel shown above is that of John Walker III. There are several land transactions involving this parcel. In the first of these, dated 1754 shows John Walker purchasing the land. The second, dated 1757, shows John Walker and wife Ann, selling the property. Since the records indicate that this John Walker's wife was named Ann it is reasonable to assume that this is John Walker III and wife Ann Houston.

The significant point about this is that the John III parcel was not aquired until 1754. This is probaby because he wasn't there, but had settled further north on Beverly's Manor. [Direct evidence of John III on Beverly's Manor is needed. There are indeed records for a John Walker in that area, but this has not yet been examined in detail.] The presumption is that in 1754 John III moved south to settle closer to his relations. This move may be related to the start of the French and Indian War (1754-1764). Possibly John III was moving closer to family where he might count on greater support.

Another factor that ties this property into ownership by John III is that it was almost immediately sold. At that time Indian attacks on the Virignia frontier forced may of the settlers to remove to North Carolina. County records for 19 August, 1757 note that " John Walker removed out of the Colony", and are probably referring to John III, and are consistent with the sale of his Walker Creek property in that year. The sale of his land in 1757 probably occurred after he left the area, as we have clear records for him purchasing land in Orange County NC, by 1756. (An earlier record from 1750 indicating that a "John Walker" had "gone to Carolina" most likely refers to the John Walker on South Branch, not John III.)

Acquisition of Land from Orange County, Virginia Court Records:

  • pages 285-289. 15 Apr 1743: Benjamin Borden of Orange County, Va, to John Walker, farmer, of same; 213 acres in Augusta County or that part of Orange County called Augusta on Hays Creek; bounded by land of James Walker and the patent line of Benjamin Borden. Witnesses: John Hart, James Moore, John Walker, James (his X mark) Robinson.

Acquisition of Land from Chalkley's:

  • Page 535.—21st Setember. 1754. Same to John Walker, Sr., plantationer, 190 acres, part of 92.100, on Walker's Creek; corner Alexander Walker, plantationer; corner James Moore. Delivered: Andrew Havs, March, 1757.
  • Page 401.--3d August, 1753. William Martin to John Walker, Sr., 359 acres on Mudlick Run on Roanoke, otherwise called Goose Creek. Iron mine. Delivered: Mr. Hayes, 1757. Teste: Hugh Martin, Charles and Andrew Hayes. See page 409, supra. (Note: this could be this John Walker, but not proven)
  • Page 409.--2d August, 1753. Hugh Martin to John Walker, Sr., 112 acres on Mudlick Run and joining on a branch of Roanoke called Goose Creek. See page 401 above. (Note: this could be this John Walker, but not proven)


A passage from White 1902:625 provides information about the Walker settlement on Walkers Creek:

  • Alexander Walker...the nephew of John and Katherine Walker, the emigrants...with his brother and cousin Alexander (eighth child of John and Katherine) went to Virginia and settled on on...Walker's Creek...this was the fall of 1734. Alexander lived on a farm now owned by William Walker; his brother John settled abut one mile up the creek, and their cousin Alexander pitched his tent nearer the Jump Mountain, about one-half mile from his cousin Alexander's place.

This passage refers to

White's description of the settlement on Walker's Creek is largely, but not completely supported by land records. Note in particular that White makes no mention of Samuel, cousin of Alexander and Gunstocker John.

The two tracts dated to 1743 are almost certainly for Alexander "Sawney" and his brother "Gunstocker John". These tracts were probably settled in 1738, and their title was conveyed in 1743. The tract dated 1773 to James Walker is probably the one originally owned by Alexander Walker (son of John II), and transferred to his son James in 1773. The final tract dated 1754 was almost certainly owned by John Walker III, as court records refer to the owner of this same parcel as "John Walker and wife Ann".

A significant point about this is that the John III parcel was not aquired until 1754. White's description, presumably based on family information gathered in her research, makes no mention of John III as one of the early settlers on Walkers Creek. This is probaby because he wasn't there, but had settled further north on Beverly's Manor. [Direct evidence of John III on Beverly's Manor is needed. There are indeed records for a John Walker in that area, but this has not yet been examined in detail.] The presumption is that in 1754 John III moved south to settle closer to his relations. This move may be related to the start of the French and Indian War (1754-1764). Possibly John III was moving closer to family where he might count on greater support.

Another factor that ties this property into ownership by John III is that it was sold almost immediately sold. At that time Indian attacks on the Virignia frontier forced may of the settlers to quit the area for North Carolina. County records for 19 August, 1757 note that " John Walker removed out of the Colony", and are probably referring to John III, and consistent with the sale of his Walker Creek property in that year. The sale of his land in 1757 probably occurred after he left the area, as we have clear records for him purchasing land in Orange County NC, by 1756. (An earlier record from 1750 indicating that a "John Walker" had "gone to Carolina" most likely refers to the John Walker on South Branch, not John III.)

We might ask, "Why does White not mention James, who is clearly in the area based on land records." The answer to this question is not fully known. It appears from the land records that James died or left the area sometime before 1773. Records do not seem to have survived on this point, but it appears that this southern parcel at the foot of Jump Mountain, came into possession of Alexander Walker, who later transferred it to his son James in 1773. It may be that White learned that the Jump Mountain parcel was originally owned by a cousin of Gunstocker John and Sawney Alexander (ie, James Walker, brother of John III). She may also have picked up on the fact that it had come into the possession of Alexander Walker, and assumed that since it was owned by a cousin, that this Alexander Walker the brother of John III.

Caswell County, NC

John Walker III took his family from Borden's Grant in modern Rockbridge Co. VA, to Orange Co. NC, about 1756. This is attested to by

  • his land purchases in Orange Co in 1756,
  • the sale of his property on Walkers Creek in 1757
  • statements in the Augusta County Court records of 1757 that John Walker was "Gone to Carolina".

It is likely that preparations for the move occurred in 1755, at the outbreak of the French and Indian War, and that he was presumably in NC shortly before his land purchases in 1756. Land transactions on Mud Lick, near Roanoke, suggest that he may have considered a less drastic move.

There were several families of Walkers in the general area where John Walker III settled. Immediately prior to his move to Southwest Virginia John sold a parcel on "Moon Creek", noting that his soninlaw person:Patrick Porter (1) now lived there. He may have owned land elsewhere in the general area, but this transaction leads us to associate him with Moon Creek. Other groups of Walkers in the area include those associated with Hogan's Creek to the west. The exact relationship of these Walkers to John III has not been worked out, but YDNA evidence indicates that they are closely related, and share a common ancestor in the relatively recent past.

Key
Moon Crk Walkers
YDNA Group 33 John Walker
U. Hogan Crk Walkers
YDNA Group 33 William Walker
L. Hogan Crk Walkers
YDNA Group 33 Samuel Walker
Jordan Crk Walkers
John and Phillip Walker
Sandy Crk Walkers
YDNA Group 1 Samuel Walker

Castle's Wood

Scott County, Virginia
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Scott County, Virginia

About 1771 John III left the Caswell County area, moving to Southwest Virginia, which had been newly opened for settlement in 1769. He settled on a parcel on Sinking Creek, in modern Scott County, between the communities of Dungannon and Place:Castles Woods. This property later became known as "Broadmeadows. Other family members settled in the colonial community of Castle's Woods (near modern Castlewood) in adjacent Russell County, VA. See Walker Family in Southwest Virginia for a discussion of Washington County records related to various Walkers in Washington County up to and immediately after the Revolution.

Alternatives

  1. Some family historians identify John III as "Gunmaker John", distinguishing him from his uncle "Gunstocker John". White 1902 does identify the son of Alexander I as "Gunstocker John", but does not identify John III as "Gunmaker". There does not seem to be any evidence that John III ever engaged in gunmaking, or was in fact known as "Gunmaker John". Gilbert 1972 refers to John III as "Ranger John". "Ranger" is a term applied to persons who ranged the back country during the Indian Wars, searching for signs of pending Indian attacks. There seems to be no evidence that John III ever "ranged". Gilbert may have confused records for another John Walker who remained in the Rockbridge area after the departure of John III and his family. [Check Gilbert to see exactly what he said on this subject]
  2. One of the late Jerry Penley's contributions to Wigton Walker genealogy was the identification of land transactions by John Walker "of Orange Co, NC" in the Roanoke area. Jerry was able to link these transactions with John Walker III. Jerry directed attention to a record showing that this particular John Walker had requested that his brothers Samuel and Joseph of Augusta County be given power of attourney to sell his land on Mud Lick. It was felt that this was pointing toward Samuel and Joseph on Borden's Grant, and linked this John Walker to the Wigton Walker line. DNA results in Group 33 of the Walker DNA study have led to the conclusion that the Wigton line was not the unified family grouping as once believed, but composed of two separate and independent components now referred to as the Walkers Creek line and the Natural Bridge line. A current working hypothesis on this is that the John Walker who requested the power of attorney for his two brothers, was not John Walker III of the Walkers Creek line, but another John Walker altogether. That John Walker may be part of the Natural Bridge line, or a completely different line of Walkers in the Rockbridge Co area. The main reason for this suggestion is because John III is believed to have been acquiring land on Walkers Creek in the 1753 period, at the same time that the property around Roanoke was being acquired. While this is not impossible, it seems unlikely that the same John Walker would be acquiring land in both areas simultaneously. [Need to verfy these data points, and add anchor links to the records. This idea needs serious review, as recent researchers believe there is reason to believe that the land on Mud Lick was indeed purchased by John III.] Bill 20:54, 26 November 2007 (EST)




Research

Much of what White tells us about the family history has not been independently confirmed with primary sources. White, herself, sometimes does not explain the basis for her statements. As a result, there is a need to critically assess the family history as given by White, the objective being to confirm or refute her presentation. With regard to John Walker III, and wife Ann Houston, some of the information provided by White 1902 can be confirmed or at least shown to be consistent with primary source material.

The following summarizes what White has to say about this family.

  • John Walker III was eldest son of John the emigrant, b. March 1705, m. Ann Houston (or Huston) March 1734. They moved from Pennsylvania in company with his brother-in-law, John Campbell, and settled in Augusta Co., VA. The Walker's and Hay's soon removed to Rockbridge County, the Creeks on which they settled being named for these two families. He d. on the Clinch River in 1778.

There are a number of specific facts provided by White in the above statement. The following summarizes what can be said about the accuracy of White's statements.

  • Wills for Ann Houston's father, Christopher Houston, and brother Samuel, list Ann as an heir. Samuel's will of 1739 specifically identifies his sister as "Ann Walker", indicating that she was married by that date, a point consistent with White's DOM for this couple of 1734. Samuel's will does not give the first name of Ann's husband, only telling us that she is identified as "Ann Walker". this interpretation is consistent with the information in White 1902. It seems probable that the Ann Walker mentioned in Samuel's will is indeed the wife of John Walker III.
  • Land records for Rockbridge county show several Walkers settling on Walker's Creek in Rockbridge CO, VA, prior to 1741. A land transaction in 1753 shows a John Walker and wife Ann selling a parcel on Walkers Creeks adjacent to other Walkers whose property was surveyed in the early 1740's. These data are consistent with White 1902's assertion that the family moved to Rockbrdige Co shortly after their initial settlement in Augusta Co. Following the marriage of John Walker and Ann Houston in 1734.
  • John III was living on the Clinch River when he died sometime between 1774 and 1778. The commonly cited 1778 date is probably based on White's description above, and/or may be founded on his will which was probated in that year. It is likely, however, that he died several years previous to the court records dealing with his estate. His son Samuel is believed to have died in an Indian attack in 1776, but is mentioned in John III's will. Likewise, his grandson William (son of John IV) was taken captive by Indians in that same attack. Yet both are mentioned in John III's will, indicating that it was written prior to 1776. It seems likely that John III died prior to this attack. A DOD of c.1776 seems reasonable.
  • White tells us that John Campbell=Elizabeth Walker, settled near Staunton, a few miles north of where the Walkers ultimately settled on Walkers Creek in Rockbridge Co. The area John Campbell is said to have settled is most ikely part of Beverly's Grant, where settlement began about 1734. This is consistent with the Walker family moving from the Nottingham Lots about that time. A thorough search of land records etc in this area is needed to determine if there is any evidence that a John Campbell settled in this area about this time.

Footnotes

  1. White, Emma Siggins. Genealogy of the descendants of John Walker of Wigton, Scotland: with records of a few allied families, also war records and some fragmentary notes pertaining to the history of Virginia, 1600-1902. (Kansas City, Missouri: Tiernan-Dart Printing Co., 1902), p. 6.
  2.   Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800. (Rosslyn, Virginia: The Commonwealth Printing Company, 1912-1913 in Three Volumes).
  3. John's DOD is often given as 17 Nov 1778. This, however, is the date his will entered probate. It is believed that he actually died well before this date. Numerous wills were entered into probate in 1778 in Washington County, and this is believed to be related to changes in inheritance laws. Heretofore, inheritance followed primogeniture, and all the estate, apart from the Widows dower, devolved to the eldest son. At the start of the Revolution Virginia law changed to abandon primogeniture, with all children inheriting equally, assuming the deceased died intestate. As a result it became more important for settlers to state their specific wishes if they wished for provisions other than equal inheritance. John's will includes a bequest to his son Samuel, which means that the will was written before Samuel's death c July 1777. A date of death between 1776 and 1777 seems most consistent with the known facts.
  4. Hildebrands map dates this parcel to 1773. [[User:Delijim has checked this item and concluded that based deed records, the title to this parcel was transferred in 1743, not 1773. This discovery renders much of the following discussion, moot, or inaccurate at best, requiring extensive modification.