Person:John Reynolds (138)

Watchers
John Reynolds
b.abt. 1751
  1. John Reynoldsabt 1751 - abt 1815
  2. James Reynolds1754 - 1801
  3. Martha 'Patsy' Reynoldsabt 1757 - aft 1847
  4. Sarah Reynolds
  5. Elizabeth 'Bettie' Reynolds
  6. William Reynoldsabt 1760 - 1793
  7. Thomas Reynolds1767 - 1838
  8. Reuben Reynolds
  9. Henry Bayne 'Harry' Reynoldsbef 1776 -
  1. James Reynoldsest 1773 - 1826
  2. Thomas J. Reynoldsbef 1776 -
  3. Ann Reynoldsbef 1784 -
  4. Hannah 'Fanny' Reynoldsbef 1784 -
  5. William Reynolds1783 - 1841
Facts and Events
Name John Reynolds
Unknown John Runnels
Alt Name John Runnills
Gender Male
Birth? abt. 1751
Death? abt. 1815 Botetourt County, Virginia

John Reynolds was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

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Records in Botetourt County, VA

Botetourt County, Virginia
Deed Book: 21
Proved: Partly at April Court 1817 & final, January 12, 1835.
Page 43-44: Reynolds Heirs to William Reynolds - This Indenture made this twenty fourth day of August in the year of Christ one thousand eight hundred and sixteen between James Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Thomas Reynolds and Sarah his wife, John Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Joseph Givens & Anna his wife, Joseph Taylor and Frances his wife heirs and heiress of John Reynolds dec'd of the one part and William Reynolds of Botetourt County & State of Virginia of the other part. Witnesseth that the said James Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Thomas Reynolds and Sarah his wife, John Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Joseph Givens and Anna his wife and Joseph Taylor and Frances his wife heirs and heiress of John Reynolds dec'd in consequence of a title bond executed by the above mentioned John Reynolds in his life time to his son William Reynolds for part of a tract of land whereon the said John Reynolds lived in his life time which his heirs was bound to convey to said William Reynolds at the death of said John Reynolds & Magdaline his wife, notwithstanding the said Magdaline is still alive, we are willing to make the Conveyance agreeably to said title bond: Witnesseth that the above mentioned heirs and heiress for and in consideration of the sum of one dollar to us in hand paid by the said William Reynolds at or before the ensealing and delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath granted bargained and sold and by these presents doth grant bargain and sell unto the said William Reynolds his heirs & assigns part of a Certain tract or parcel of Land patented in the name of John Reynolds by Survey bearing date the 29th December 1796 and patent dated the 28th day of May 1798 for 320 acres of land lying and being in the County of Botetourt on the head of Sinking Creek a branch of New river and bounded as follows. Beginning at two white oaks on the south side of the Waggon Road, near the houses of s'd John Reynolds dec'd from thence along the waggon Road to the end of the lane towards Joseph Givens land, thence up the hill with the old fence as it now stands to the outside line towards the little mountain, thence with the lines of said Survey of 320 acres to the Beginning, Containing (blank) acres, together with all and singular appurtenances & To have and to hold the said land to the only proper use and behoof of him the said William Reynolds his heirs and assigns forever and the said James Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Thomas Reynolds and Sarah his wife, John Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Joseph Givens and Anna his wife, and Joseph Taylor and Frances his wife the said land contained within the limits above mentioned with all and singular the appurtenances unto the said William Reynolds his heirs and assigns free from the Claim or Claims of them the said James Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Thomas Reynolds and Sarah his wife, John Reynolds and Susanna his wife, Joseph Givens and Anna his wife, and Joseph Taylor and Frances his wife, heirs and heiress and representatives of the Estate of John Reynolds Dec'd or any person or persons claiming under them Shall and will warrant & forever defend by these presents. In testimony whereof we have here unto Set our hand and Seals the day and year above written. The word "part of" in the 30th line from the beginning interlined before Signing.
Signed, Sealed and delivered
James Reynolds
Thomas Reynolds
Sarah X Reynolds (her mark)
John Reynolds
Susanna X Reynolds (her mark)
Joseph Givens
Anna X Givens (her mark)
in presence of
Js Trenor as to Js Reynolds
Thomas Reynolds, Sarah Reynolds
John Reynolds, Susanna Reynolds
and Joseph Givens
John McIver as to Same
George H. Trenor as to Same


Notes

The first record of John Reynolds in Botetourt County is found in the Will of his father-in-law, Lodowick Thomas. Lodowick's Will was written August 15, 1775, and states: "...I do hereby appoint my trusty and well beloved friend John Runnels Executor of this my last will and testament ...." Lodowick left all of his land in Botetourt County to his daughter, Magdalin Runnills (wife of John Reynolds). This property consisted of two tracts, one about 200 acres where he formerly lived adjacent to John Caldwell and one about 100 acres located on the north fork of Johns Creek near Gasper Sarver. The survey of one of these tracts of land, probably the one on Johns Creek, wasn't properly returned to the Land Office to be recorded. John Reynolds initiated this final transaction in Lodowick's name, and Governor Thomas Jefferson signed the grant on February 1, 1781. This survey, dated September 9, 1772, contained 185 acres. John and Magdalin sold the 185 acres on October 12, 1802, to Archibald Caldwell. John's signature was on the deed and Magdalin signed with her (X) mark.
[Source: http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/craig/bios/renlds06.txt]
References
  1.   Tate, J.R. Craig County (Virginia) Archives.

    Biographical Sketches - John Reynolds, b. ca 1751, d. ca 1814


    A Biographical Narrative of John Reynolds
    Botetourt County (now Craig County), Virginia
    Wife: Magdalin Thomas, d/o Lodowick & (-?-) Thomas
    Parents: Thomas & Ann (-?-) Reynolds

    John Reynolds was the oldest son and possibly the oldest child of Thomas
    Reynolds and Ann -?- of Caroline, Madison and Botetourt Counties, Virginia.
    No records have been found for John Reynolds prior to his appearance in
    Botetourt County ca 1772/73. As a child, he would have lived with his
    parents in Caroline County and possibly Essex County, although no proof of a
    residence in Essex has been located. His approximate birth date is 1751,
    and he was probably born in either Caroline or Essex County, Virginia.

    The first record of John Reynolds in Botetourt County is found in the Will
    of his father-in-law, Lodowick Thomas. Lodowick's Will was written August
    15, 1775, and states: "...I do hereby appoint my trusty and well beloved
    friend John Runnels Executor of this my last will and testament ...."
    Lodowick left all of his land in Botetourt County to his daughter, Magdalin
    Runnills (wife of John Reynolds). This property consisted of two tracts,
    one about 200 acres where he formerly lived adjacent to John Caldwell and
    one about 100 acres located on the north fork of Johns Creek near Gasper
    Sarver. The survey of one of these tracts of land, probably the one on
    Johns Creek, wasn't properly returned to the Land Office to be recorded.
    John Reynolds initiated this final transaction in Lodowick's name, and
    Governor Thomas Jefferson signed the grant on February 1, 1781. This
    survey, dated September 9, 1772, contained 185 acres. John and Magdalin
    sold the 185 acres on October 12, 1802, to Archibald Caldwell. John's
    signature was on the deed and Magdalin signed with her (X) mark.

    Magdalin's father, Lodowick Thomas, was an early resident of the Sinking
    Creek/Johns Creek area. He is known to have been in that area of Botetourt
    (then Augusta County) when he was a drummer in Capt. William Christian's
    1764 Militia Company which was organized to protect the frontier from Indian
    attack. He probably had lived there for some years prior to that date.
    Lodowick may have been the Ludwick Thomas, age 34, who arrived at
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on the ship Queen Elizabeth, September 16, 1738.
    This possibility has not been proven, but if true, Magdalin and some of her
    siblings could have been born in Pennsylvania prior to the family's
    relocation to Virginia.

    A marriage record for John Reynolds and Magdalin Thomas has not been found.
    It is likely John and Magdalin were married in the area where her family
    resided in Botetourt County. Their marriage is estimated to have been
    between 1771 and 1775.

    John Reynolds was a member of the local militia. He is found on the list of
    officers recommended or appointed by the County in July 1780. Botetourt County
    Court Order Book 5A, page 42: "Joseph Loony is appointed Capt in Capt
    McMurtrays Co. John Reynolds Leut, and Abraham Looney Ensign." This militia
    company consisted of men who lived in the Sinking Creek Valley area of
    Botetourt. Capt. Joseph Looney was made commander of this unit the same year.
    Capt. Looney's militia company was quite active during the Revolutionary War;
    it is known to have served at the Lead Mines on the New River, Guilford Court
    House and Yorktown. Lt. John Reynolds is also listed on the 1782 muster roll
    for Looney's company. No record of John Reynolds' militia service at any
    specific time or place has been found, even though it is likely that he was
    with the company during most of their tours of duty. No known DAR or SAR
    membership have been granted using Lt. John Reynolds' service record.

    John Reynolds compiled the list of tithables in his District for the year
    1785. He was appointed Constable in Botetourt County on September 13, 1791,
    an appointment he held until his death.

    In 1813 John gave a title bond for part of a tract of land where he then lived
    to his son, William. John's home tract was located on the headwaters of
    Sinking Creek, a branch of New River probably between the head waters of
    Sinking and Meadow Creek, a branch of Craig Creek, a branch of the James
    River. Another description states that it was located on the Sinking Creek
    side of Johns Creek Mountain. A deed was made for this tract August 24, 1816
    and partly proved at April Court 1817 & finally proved and recorded January
    12, 1835. This deed names all of John and Magdalin's children:

    1. James Reynolds and Susanna his wife.
    2. Thomas Reynolds and Sarah his Wife.
    3. John Reynolds and Susanna his wife.
    4. Joseph Givens and Anna his wife.
    5. Joseph Taylor and Frances his wife.
    6. William Reynolds (Wife was Sarah "Sally").

    John Reynolds died intestate, probably at his home in Botetourt County, in
    the late fall of 1814, but his death might have occurred in early January
    1815. There is a reference to this fact in court papers. At the Thursday,
    January 10, 1815, Botetourt Court, his son-in-law, Joseph Givens, was "...
    appointed Constable in this county in the room of John Reynolds dec'd." At
    Botetourt County Court, Thursday, March 14, 1815, administration of John
    Reynolds' estate was granted to his wife, Magdalin Reynolds, and son-in-law,
    Joseph Givens. An inventory of the estate was ordered. Listed with the
    estate were the following slaves:

    1 Negro Woman, Milly, age 50
    1 Mulatto Woman, Zellah, age 19
    1 Mulatto Woman, Happy, age 17
    1 Negro girl, Mahaly, age 12
    1 Negro girl Eliza, age 9
    1 Negro girl Franky, age 7
    1 Negro boy Jerry, age 14.

    Magdalin Reynolds' Dower share of the estate was allotted to her at the
    April 1815 Court. Her share consisted of land and three female slaves:
    Milly, Negro, age 50, Zillack/Zellah, Mulatto, age 19 and Franky, Negro, age
    7. These slaves and others who had originally belonged to the Reynolds
    family would attempt to gain their freedom in a court case initiated by
    Milly in 1815. This case would span about 25 years before its final
    resolution in 1840. Many participants in this suit would be dead before the
    final outcome was decided.

    In April 1817, Joseph Givens traveled to Madison County, Virginia, while
    settling John Reynolds' estate. He claimed $8.22 for his expenses incurred
    during the trip. The exact purpose of this visit is unknown. John
    Reynolds' brother, Henry "Harry" Byne Reynolds, is known to have lived in
    Madison County as well as his mother, Ann Reynolds, before her death ca
    1810. The Reynolds family slaves were probably the reason for the visit,
    and Henry Reynolds would be the only known person in Madison County with an
    interest in their disposition. Joseph Given died ca 1831 and the last known
    administrator of the John Reynolds estate was John T. Anderson.

    Several inventories were made of John Reynolds' estate. One, in 1831,
    includes the following list of the slaves belonging to the estate:

    Negro woman, Happy, age about 32
    Negro boy Davy, age 10
    Negro girl Mary, age 6
    Negro boy Roland, age 3
    Negro woman Mahalah, age 28
    Negro woman Eliza, age 27
    Negro girl Lucinda, age 5
    Negro girl Matilda, age 3
    Negro girl Mahalah, age 7 mo.
    Negro boy, Daniel, age 5.

    Another inventory, conducted in 1841, included the names of the following
    slaves:

    Happy, age 42
    Two children age 2 & 4.
    David, age 20
    Mary, age 18
    Maria, age 16
    Rowland, age 13
    Mahala, age 38
    Eliza, age 37
    Lucinda, age 15
    Matilda, age 13
    Mahala, age 10
    Daniel, age 15,
    Samuel, age 9
    Wm. (William), age 7
    Lunceford, age 6
    Almina, age 4
    Juby, age 2

    Magdalin Reynolds died testate at Botetourt County ca Fall of 1821. Her
    will, dated August 30, 1821, was probated at the 1821 November Court. In
    it, she named the following children and grandchildren:

    Anna Reynolds d/o son William
    Jane Reynolds d/o son -?- (probably James)
    1. James Reynolds
    2. Thomas Reynolds
    3. John Reynolds
    4. Ann Givens
    5. Fanny Taylor
    6. William Reynolds.

    The names and number of children in this will agree with the 1816 deed and
    appear to be listed in the order of birth.

    There were three court cases filed against John Reynolds and his estate from
    which most of the details of his family are drawn. Two against his estate
    were initiated in Botetourt County, Virginia. His mother initiated the
    third case in Madison County, Virginia, prior to 1808. Details of the
    Madison County case have not been located. The case was probably tried in
    Madison County, but no attempt has been made to locate Court records of the
    outcome.

    Madison County (Ann Rennolds/Reynolds') Case:
    John Reynolds' mother, Ann Rennolds/Reynolds, wrote her last will and
    testament on May 17, 1808, in Madison County, Virginia. In this will, she
    referenced an active District Court case against her son, John Reynolds, by
    the following:

    "My son John Rennolds haveing a parcel of Negrows now in his percession
    which his Father (Thomas Reynolds) let him remove to his Hous & at the death
    of his Father he willed them to certain other persons which records will
    shoe & he the said John Rennolds refuseing to give up said Negrows & a suit
    is commeced & now depending in the District Cort and undetermed now if he
    the said John Rennolds shuld by virtue of Law obtain & keep the Negrows now
    at law for then he the said John Rennolds is by this my will to have no part
    of my Estate, but if he the said John Rennolds shuld by virtue of law be
    forst to give the said Negrows up then he the said John Rennolds his heirs
    shall inherit an equal moite with the rest of my Children."

    John Reynolds' father, Thomas Reynolds, was born abt. 1725 in either
    Caroline or Essex County, Virginia. His occupation was School Master. He
    was married ca 1750 to Ann -?-. (There is a possibility that Ann was the
    d/o Maj. Simon Miller of Essex County, but this is only speculation at this
    time.) Thomas' actual birth date is unknown but 1725 is estimated based on
    a probable marriage to Ann ca 1750. Records from Caroline County indicate
    that they were living in that county in 1772. In 1782, Thomas resided at
    Port Royal where he lived and held classes at the home of a Mr. Frawner.

    The only land Thomas is known to have owned in Caroline County was 50 acres
    that he purchased from the Ship family in 1782. His ownership of this land
    was later in dispute. Thomas and Ann were slave owners and probably most of
    the slaves were hired out to others for income. Thomas and Ann Reynolds
    continued to live in Caroline County until about 1786/87 when they
    separated. Thomas moved to Botetourt County to live with their oldest son,
    John. Ann moved to Madison County where she purchased two tracts of land.
    She lived on one of these and she loaned the other to her youngest son,
    Henry "Harry" Byne Reynolds. The reason Thomas and Ann lived apart is
    unknown. Thomas was living in Botetourt County by about 1786. He continued
    to live there until his death except for a period when he, according to a
    neighbor, Daniel Givens, "went down county." He was probably with Ann in
    Madison County during this time. Thomas died testate in 1804 in Botetourt
    County, and Ann died testate in 1810 in Madison County.

    Thomas & Ann Reynolds' Children:

    (Birth order of children has been interpreted from Ann Reynolds' listing of
    her children in her Will of 1808; only Martha's birth date, ca 1757, has
    been found to date.)

    1. John Reynolds, b. ca 1751 (subject of this narrative)
    2. Bettie (Elizabeth?) Reynolds, m. Samuel McGee and probably lived in
    Caroline County, Virginia.
    3. Sarah Reynolds, m. Thomas Loyd/Lloyd.
    4. James Reynolds
    5. Martha "Patsy" Reynolds, b. ca 1757; m. John Pettis, a Revolutionary War
    veteran. They were wed at Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, in 1786
    and later lived in Spotsylvania County. Patsy removed to Orange County,
    Virginia, to live with one of her sons after John's death.
    6. William Reynolds
    7. Thomas Reynolds removed to Kentucky by 1804.
    8. Reuben Reynolds
    9. Henry "Harry" Byne Reynolds, m. prob. Polly Zachary, 1796 in Madison
    County, Virginia.

    Thomas Reynolds brought a Negro woman slave along with him when he came to
    live with his oldest son, John, in Botetourt County ca 1786/87. Thomas had
    moved to Botetourt from either Caroline or Madison County, Virginia. This
    slave was named Milly, the same Milly, age 50, listed on the 1815 inventory
    of John Reynolds' estate, part of Magdalin's Dower, and the one freed by
    Thomas's Deed of Emancipation (see below). (The slaves referenced in Ann
    Reynolds' Will would have been Milly and her children, who were born in
    Botetourt between Thomas' arrival ca 1786/87 and his death in 1804.) John
    was still in possession of Milly and her descendants when he died in the
    Fall of 1814, thus, it is apparent that Ann's suit (cited above) to regain
    the slaves failed. (Details of that court case, when found, could give
    valuable clues as to how Thomas and Ann obtained ownership of Milly and
    their other slaves.) Since Thomas was a School Master, it is unlikely that
    he purchased slaves himself. There is a possibility that Ann may have
    inherited the slaves from another person or perhaps from her father.

    Sometime after Thomas arrived in Botetourt County, he sold Milly and one or
    more of her children to his son John for 200#. (The number of Milly's
    children depends on when the sale was made.) Part of this agreement appears
    to have been that John was to take care of his father. In 1797, Thomas told
    one of his neighbors, Ammy Handly, that John was not properly caring for
    him. Another neighbor, _____ Givens, stated that he had heard Thomas
    Reynolds say: "... that he had sold to John Reynolds or let him have the
    negroes & that said John was to keep him & furnish him with suitable
    clothing, which he had failed to do ..." Thomas must have thought that John
    had broken the promise he had made to care for him when he had sold him the
    slaves. Whatever the circumstances and apparently without telling anyone,
    in the Fall of 1797, Thomas journeyed to Sweet Springs, where the District
    Court was located, and initiated a Deed of Emancipation freeing all of the
    slaves that he thought were or should be his property. What evidence he
    used (if any) to prove his ownership is not known. The "for certain good
    causes" he refers to in the Deed (see the following) was probably his
    dissatisfaction with how he thought his son was treating him. Note the name
    and age of the slaves given in the Deed. Milly was the mother of the
    children. Isaac, age 10, was Milly's first born after she arrived in
    Botetourt County. This would indicate that Thomas and Milly arrived in
    Botetourt about 10 or 11 years prior to 1797 (1786/87). The source for this
    information was John Reynolds' neighbor, Daniel Givens, father-in-law of his
    daughter, Anna.

    Thomas Reynolds' Deed of Emancipation, 1797:
    "Be it Remembered to all whom it may concern - that for certain good causes
    but especially that it is contrary to the commands of Christ to keep my
    fellow creatures in bondage, I do hereby liberate all my slaves and
    relinguish all my rights, tittle & interest in them, to wit, Milly Man,
    Isaac Man, Jacob Man, Minny Man, Ester Man, Sally Man, Frances Man,
    reserving to myself the guardian care of (Isaac aged ten, Jacob aged eight,
    Minny aged six, Ester aged four, Sally aged two, Frances aged one month)
    untill they arrive at the age of twenty one, In witness whereof I do
    hereunto set my hand & seal this 18th day of October 1797.

    Signed - Thomas Reynolds (Seal)
    Test-Saml Mitchell, Mitchell Porter

    At a district court held at the Sweet Springs the 19th day of October 1797
    this instrument of writing from Thomas Reynolds for liberating the slaves
    within mentioned was acknowledged by the said Thomas Reynolds and ordered to
    be recorded. Teste Samuel Dew CDC"

    Thomas had a short memory or he was getting senile, because in his Will he
    left these same slaves to his children and grandchildren.

    Botetourt County (Milly Mann's Case) (Case No 1):
    It is not clear when John found out about the Deed of Emancipation. It might
    have been after Thomas died in 1804. John made several inquiries about the
    validity of the Bill of Sale he had gotten from Thomas when he had purchased
    the slaves from him. He was assured that it was good and any other action
    taken concerning the ownership of the slaves was not valid. Thomas must have
    told Milly about the deed, but, in any case, after John's death in 1814, she
    must have seen her chance to use that knowledge. She contacted several
    lawyers, and, on her behalf, they initiated a case at the Botetourt County
    August 1815 Court to gain the freedom for herself and her children that Thomas
    had granted them in his Deed of Emancipation. The eventual result of the
    trial was that they were found to be free based on Thomas' Deed and the lack
    of proof that Thomas had ever sold the slaves to his son, John. The bill of
    sale had vanished. Upon and during a lengthy appeal of the verdict, Milly,
    her children and grandchildren, remained enslaved. After years of legal
    maneuvering, the original trial was set aside and the one case broken up into
    five separate ones. On Tuesday, Sept. 8, 1840 a new jury trial of all five
    cases was held with the following results: "We the Jury find that the
    Plaintiffs are slaves as the Defendants in the pleading have alleged. We
    therefore find for the Defendants."

    Botetourt County (Ann Givens') Case (Case No 2):
    Joseph Givens married John Reynolds' daughter, Anna. Joseph was co-
    administrator, along with the Widow, Magdalin, of John's estate. Joseph died
    ca 1831. After the completion of the above slave trial in Sept 1840, Anna
    initiated a Chancery suit in late 1840 or early 1841 for a final division of
    John Reynolds' estate among the heirs. The court records of this case include
    a list of all of John and Magdalin's children and grandchildren who were
    included in this suit. The case was decided in April 1842, and the Court
    ordered the remainder of the John's estate be sold and the money divided among
    the heirs. Actual amounts for each heir to be determined according to what
    they had already received from the estate. The sale was to include the slaves
    and two tracts of land remaining in the estate.

    Heirs of John Reynolds listed in Givens Vs Reynolds Heirs and
    Representatives 1841/1842 (Botetourt County Case No.2):

    The heirs of John Reynolds' deceased children were made a party to the case
    and are named in the Court papers. Some spouses named in the suit are known
    to have been from a second marriage and so could others. Some of the names
    are confused and it is difficult to place them with the proper parent. All
    need to be verified. Residence ca 1841 are given in the records
    when the location was known.

    1. James Reynolds, deceased, his children are named.
    (First wife: deceased (probably Susanna Hughes)
    (Second wife: deceased (Susanna Trout) Proved by others.
    a. Thomas
    b. Jacob (Jefferson County, Illinois)
    c. John (Vermilion County, Illinois)
    d. William H.(Vermilion County, Illinois)
    e. Andrew (Vermilion County, Illinois)
    f. Calvin (Vermilion County, Illinois)
    g. Lewis B. (Henry County, Indiana)
    h. Senia/Cenia/Seney m. George W. Pate (Vermilion County, Illinois)
    i. Nancy m. William Cassell/Cassel/Castle (Vermilion County, Illinois)
    j. Frances Ann "Fanny" m. Jefferson Ward (Henry County, Indiana)
    k. Hannah Magdalene m. William Stephens/Stevens (Henry County, Indiana)

    2. Thomas J. Reynolds, deceased, his wife and children are named.
    Wife: Sarah -?- (probably Sarah Caldwell)
    a. James
    b. Hugh
    d. Henry
    e. Margaret m. William Stokes/Starkes
    f. Mary m. Martin Moody
    g. Ruth m. John Caldwell
    h. Alexander, infant - (William Kile, guardian)
    i. Breckenridge, infant - (William Kile, guardian

    3. John Reynolds, living, (Giles County, Va.), wife from other sources.
    Wife: Susanna Taylor (John and Susanna's children and their spouses are
    from other sources and not verified unless noted):
    a. James m. "Katie" Caldwell
    d. John m. Elizabeth Wallace
    e. Andrew m. Amanda Lucas
    b. Joseph m. Elean Lucas
    f. Mary "Polly" m. George Stafford Williams (verified)
    g. Nancy m. William Givens
    h. Alexander m. Elizabeth Williams
    i. William m. Ann Givens

    4. Anna, living, (Botetourt County, Va.)
    Husband: Joseph Givens, deceased. (Children are from this case & a
    separate Chancery cause by John Givens infant of Joel, deceased vs. Widow &
    children of Joseph Givens, deceased. Givens vs. Givens case was transferred
    to Craig County after formation in 1852, final outcome unknown.)
    a. John
    b. William
    c. Madison
    d. James H.
    e. Patsey m. John Sarver
    f. Mary m. William Leffel
    g. Frances m. Boston (Sebastian) Rowan
    h. Joel, deceased, had an infant son John, John Givens guardian.

    5. Frances "Fanny", living (Carroll County, Indiana)
    Husband: Joseph C. Taylor

    6. William Reynolds, deceased, his wife and children are named.
    Wife: Sarah Ferrier
    a. Lewis (Warren County, Indiana)
    b. Margaret/Margaretta m. -?- Wells (May have first m. -?- Trenor)
    c. Ann m. Elias Smith
    d. Robert
    e. James (infant) - (William Kile, guardian)
    f. Trenor (infant) - (William Kile, guardian)
    g. Joel (infant) - (William Kile, guardian)

    Note: Guardians for the various infant children were appointed by the Court
    to represent them in the Chancery suit. Some of these children may not
    actually be infants. The existing records are not clear.