Person:John Ormsby (4)

m. Jul 1764
  1. Sydney Ormsbyabt 1774 -
Facts and Events
Name[5] John Ormsby
Gender Male
Birth? abt 1720 County Mayo, Republic of Ireland
Marriage Jul 1764 to Jane McAllister
Other? 1768 Bedford, Pennsylvania, United StatesTax Assessment
Death? 19 Dec 1805 Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United States

John Ormsby

  • Virginia's governor, John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, traveled to Pittsburgh, which Virginia claimed as part of its territory, to appoint government officials under the Virginia charter. In 1774, the Virginia assembly separated the western portion of Augusta County's territory and formed the District of West Augusta.
  • Montgomery, Thomas Lynch (editor). Pennsylvania Archives. 6th Series, Vol. 2, Page 3. Harrisburg Publishing Company, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1906.
Committee Of Observation - 16 May 1775
"At a meeting of the inhabitants of that part of Augusta County that lies on the west side of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania), at Pittsburgh, the 16th day of May, 1775, the following gentlemen were chosen a committee for the said district, viz.: George Croghan, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, John Canon, John McCullough, William Goe, George Vallandigham, John Gibson, Dorsey Pentecost, Edward Cook, William Crawford, Devereux Smith, John Anderson, David Rogers, Jacob Van Meter, Henry Enoch, James Ennis, George Wilson, William Vance, David Shepherd, William Elliott, Richmond Willis, Samuel Semple, John Ormsby, Richard McMaher, John Nevill, and John Swearingen." Geography: District of West Augusta included all that part of Pennsylvania east of the Allegheny and Ohio, south of the Indian boundary line at Kittanning, Pennsylvania and west of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania). Yohogania County included that part of District of West Augusta north of the mouth of Cross Creek and the point where Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania) crosses the south line of Pennsylvania.
References
  1.   John Ormsby (Pittsburgh), in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   Jessica Cox. The Life Of Pittsburgh's First Physician Dr. Nathaniel Bedford. (Allegheny County Medical Society), Pages: 21, 32, 43, 54 , 2012.
  3.   Consul Willshire Butterfield. Washington-Irvine Correspondence: The Official Letters which Passed Between Washington and Brig.-Gen. William Irvine and Between Irvine and Others Concerning Military Affaris In The West From 1781 To 1783. (Madison, Wisconcin: David Atwood, 1882).

    Page 31 - More than half the month of January, 1779, wore away without anything of importance occurring to the westward of Pittsburgh, when Samuel Sample, an assistant quartermaster, sent by Colonel Gibson from Fort Laurens to Coshocton, for corn and other articles, had one man killed, and another deperately wounded, by treacherous Delawares. The man killed was John Nash, of the thirteenth Virginia regiment; killed 22 Jan 1779. The man wounded was Peter Parchment, of the same regiment as Nash; wounded on the 27th Jan 1779; he finally recovered.

    Page 150, 151, 152 - Carlisle, May 08, 1783 - Irvine to Washington - This letter is the last one written by Irvine as commander of the western department to Washington - "Sir: - Your excellency's favor of the 16th of April did not come to hand till this day. Agreeable to your desire, I will proceed to Fort Pitt immediately..." - Irvine reached Fort Pitt on his third trip out, a little past the middle of May. On the first of July, because of the scarcity of provisions at his post, he furloughed most of the troops for a few days, and afterward continued the furloughing for some time, in rotation. From the fifteenth of May to the eighteenth of July, there was but one maraud of savages into the western settlements. From the last mentioned date to the time of Irvine's final departure from Pittsburgh, comparative quiet reigned throughout the western department. On the twenty sixth of September, he received a letter from the assistant secretary at war notifying him that as soon as a detachment of troops arrived which were then on their way, he would be relieved from command at Fort Pitt, which he so much desired. He was authorized to furlough as many of his garrison at once as consistent with safety. This he did, turning over the remainder to one of his captains, and on the first day of October started for his home in Carlisle.

    Before his departure, Irvine was presented with the following address - Pittsburgh, September 30, 1783 - To Brigadier General Irvine, Comanding at Fort Pitt and its Dependencies - Sir: - The inhabitants of Pittsburgh having just learned that you intend to retire from this command tomorrow, would do injustice to their own feelings if they did not express their thanks to you, and their sense of your merit as an officer. During your command in this department, you have demonstrated that amidst the tumults of war, the laws may be enforced and civil liberty and society protected. Your attention to the order and discipline of the regular troops under your command, as well as to the militia, your regard to the civil rights of the inhabitants, the care you have taken of the public property, and your economy in the expenditure of the public money, we have all witnessed. This conduct, we assure you, has given general satisfaction to a people who, before your time, were, unfortunately for them, much divided, but now united. As you are now about to quit the military life (in which your ability and integrity have been so conspicuous), we wish you all possible happiness, and that your fellow citizens may long enjoy your usefulness in civil life, in which we doubt not you will deserve their utmost confidence. We regret that we were not sooner informed of the time you intended to set out, as we are confident the whole country would have, with pride, joined us in this or mor animated and better drawn-up address. We sincerely wish you health and a happy meeting with your family and friends at Carlisle; - and are, with great esteem and respect, sir your obedient and very humble servants,

    John Ormsby
    Devereux Smith
    David Duncan
    Daniel Elliott
    Samuel Ewalt
    George Walker
    Joseph Nicholson
    Samuel Sample
    Alexander Fowler
    William Christy
    John Hardin
    William Amberson

    General Irvine's Reply - Fort Pitt, September 30, 1783 - Gentlemen: Accept my sincere thanks for the address, however flattering, handed me by you on behalf of the inhabitants of the town of Pittsburgh. Concious of the rectitude of my intentions, I am happy that they have met with your approbation. This testimony of your satisfaction is to me a most pleasing reward for the anxious moments I have passed. I have ever felt disposed to sacrafice personal considerations for the benefit not only of the public, but for that of every individual connected with my local command. Your concurrence in all the measures which I adopted to facilitate the public service, deserves my most unfeigned acknowledgments. I have the honor to be, with great gregard, gentlemen, your most obedient servant, - W. IRVINE.

  4.   Montgomery, Thomas Lynch. Pennsylvania archives. Sixth series. (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Harrisburg Pub. Co., state printer, 1906-1907), Vol. 2, Page 3.

    Committee Of Observation
    "At a meeting of the inhabitants of that part of Augusta County that lies on the west side of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania), at Pittsburgh, the 16th day of May, 1775, the following gentlemen were chosen a committee for the said district, viz.: George Croghan, John Campbell, Edward Ward, Thomas Smallman, John Canon, John McCullough, William Goe, George Vallandigham, John Gibson, Dorsey Pentecost, Edward Cook, William Crawford, Devereux Smith, John Anderson, David Rogers, Jacob Van Meter, Henry Enoch, James Ennis, George Wilson, William Vance, David Shepherd, William Elliott, Richmond Willis, Samuel Semple, John Ormsby, Richard McMaher, John Nevill, and John Swearingen." Geography: District of West Augusta included all that part of Pennsylvania east of the Allegheny and Ohio, south of the Indian boundary line at Kittanning, Pennsylvania and west of the Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania). Yohogania County included that part of District of West Augusta north of the mouth of Cross Creek and the point where Laurel Hill (Pennsylvania) crosses the south line of Pennsylvania.

  5. Succeeded in Proprietorship of Samuel Semples' Tavern.