Person:John Hoskins (23)

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John Hoskins
b.est 1585
  • HJohn Hoskinsest 1585 - 1648
  • WAnne Unknownest 1590 - 1662/3
m. est 1610
  1. Katherine Hoskinsest 1612 -
  2. John Hoskinsabt 1613 -
  3. Thomas Hoskinsabt 1613 - 1666
Facts and Events
Name John Hoskins
Gender Male
Birth[5] est 1585
Marriage est 1610 to Anne Unknown
Unknown  Refuted child?: Anthony Hoskins (1) 
Anne Unknown
Immigration[2] 1630 New Englandpresumably on Mary & John
Will[2] 1 May 1648 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Burial[3] 5 May 1648 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
References
  1.   Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England: Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register. (Boston: Little, Brown, and Co, 1860-1862), 2:466.

    JOHN, Dorchester, came, perhaps, in the Mary and John, req. adm. 19 Oct. 1630, and was made freem. 18 May foll. rep. 1637 rem. to Windsor, there d. in May or June 1648, leav. w. and only s. Thomas to enjoy his est. as by his will of May 1648 appears in Trumbull, Col. Rec. I. 483. His wid. Ann, in will, 1660, gives to her s. Thomas, his ch. John, and the w. of David Wilton. JOHN, of what place is unkn. freem. of Mass. 14 May 1634.

  2. 2.0 2.1 John Hoskins, in Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633. (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995), 2:999-1002.

    'ORIGIN: Unknown
    MIGRATION: 1630
    FIRST RESIDENCE: Dorchester
    REMOVES: Windsor 1635 ...
    BIRTH: By about 1588 based on estimated date of marriage.
    DEATH: Windsor between 1 May 1648 (date of will) and 29 June 1648 (date of inventory) [Grant 80].
    MARRIAGE: By about 1613 Ann _____ (assuming she was mother of all three of the children listed below). The language of the wills of John Hoskins and Ann Hoskins and the bunching of the estimated ages of the three possible children suggest that both Ann and John may have been married previously. ...
    COMMENTS: Given his presence at Dorchester in 1630 and his likely West Country origin, Hoskins presumably sailed on the Mary & John. Several sources state that Hoskins came from Beaminster, Dorset, but this remains only a suggestion. There were Hoskins families in Beaminster, and David Wilton, who married Hoskins's daughter (or stepdaughter) was from Beaminster, but as yet no solid evidence for this origin has been discovered [NEHGR 143:117-19].'

  3. Welles, Edwin Stanley. Births, marriages and deaths returned from Hartford, Windsor and Fairfield: and entered in the early land records of the colony of Connecticut. (Hartford, CT: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 1898), page 42.

    'John Hoskins dyed & was buried May 5 1648.'

  4.   Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633. (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995), 2:1000.

    'In his will, dated 1 May 1648 and proved on an unknown date, "John Horskins" bequeathed to "the Church £3 to be distributed by the deacons unto the poor"; to "my servant Sammuel Rockwell if he be willing to serve in my house one quarter of a year after his covenant is out which he hath formerly made, my will is that at the end of his service he shall have £6 of me; if not willing, then he shall receive £4 at the completion of his term of service already covenanted"; list of debtors; to "my wife and son Thomas" residue [CCCR 1:483-84; Manwaring 1:18].'

  5. Birth year estimated based on estimated birth years of his children.
Founders of Windsor, CT
Windsor was the first permanent English settlement in Connecticut. Local indians granted Plymouth settlers land at the confluence of the Farmington River and the west side of the Connecticut River, and Plymouth settlers (including Jonathan Brewster, son of William) built a trading post in 1633. But the bulk of the settlement came in 1635, when 60 or more people led by Reverend Warham arrived, having trekked overland from Dorchester, Massachusetts. Most had arrived in the New World five years earlier on the ship "Mary and John" from Plymouth, England. The settlement was first called Dorchester, and was renamed Windsor in 1637.

See: Stiles History of Ancient Windsor - Thistlewaite's Dorset Pilgrims - Wikipedia entry

Loomis homestead, oldest in CT.
Settlers at Windsor by the end of 1640, per the Descendants of the Founders of Ancient Windsor: Abbot - Alford - S. Allen - M. Allyn - Barber - Bartlett - M. (Barrett) (Huntington) Stoughton - Bascomb - Bassett - Benett - Birge - Bissell - Branker - Brewster - Buckland - Buell - Carter - Chappel - D. Clarke - J. Clarke - Cooke - Cooper - Denslow - Dewey - Dibble - Dumbleton - Drake - Dyer - Eels - Eggleston - Filley - Ford - Foulkes - Fyler - Gaylord - Francis Gibbs - William Gilbert - Jere. Gillett - Jon. Gillett - N. Gillett - Grant - Gridley - E. Griswold - M. Griswold - Gunn - Hannum - Hawkes - Hawkins - Hayden - Haynes - Hill - Hillier - Holcombe - Holmes - Holt - Hosford - Hoskins - Hoyte - Hubbard - Huit - Hulbert - Hull - Hurd - Hydes - Loomis - Ludlow - Lush - Marshfield - A. Marshall - T. Marshall - Mason - M. (Merwin) (Tinker) Collins - M. Merwin - Mills - Moore - Newberry - Newell - Oldage - Orton - Osborn - Palmer - Parsons - Parkman - Pattison - Phelps - Phelps - Phillips - Pinney - Pomeroy - Pond - Porter - Preston - Rainend - Randall - Rawlins - Reeves - J. Rockwell - W. Rockwell - B. Rossiter - St. Nicholas - Saltonstall - Samos - M. Sension (St. John) – R. Sension - Sexton - Staires - Starke - F. StilesH. Stiles - J. StilesT. Stiles - Stoughton - Stuckey - Talcott - E. Taylor - J. Taylor - Terry - Thornton - Thrall - Tilley - Tilton - Try - F. (Clark) (Dewey) (Phelps) - Vore - Warham - Weller - Whitehead - A. Williams - J. Williams - R. Williams - Wilton - Winchell - Witchfield - Wolcott - Young
Current Location: Hartford County, Connecticut   Parent Towns: Dorchester, Massachusetts   Daughter Towns: Windsor Locks; South Windsor; East Windsor; Ellington; Bloomfield