Person:John Campbell (205)

Watchers
m. 1695
  1. John CampbellABT 1695 - 1764
  2. Patrick Campbell1696 - 1767
  3. William CampbellABT 1704 -
  4. Catherine CampbellABT 1706 -
  5. Margaret CampbellBET 1706 AND 1708 - 1764
  6. David Campbell, "White David"1705/06 - 1790
  7. James CampbellABT 1708 - 1771
  8. Mary CampbellABT 1710 -
  9. Elizabeth Campbell1712 -
  10. Robert CampbellABT 1712 - 1768
  11. Lady Mary Ann CampbellBET 1715 AND 1720 - 1801
Facts and Events
Name[3] John Campbell
Alt Name John Campbell, Sr.
Gender Male
Birth? 16 NOV 1674 Kilmacrenan, Drumboden, Donegal, Republic of Ireland
Alt Birth[1] BEF 1678 Ireland
Marriage 1695 Ulster, Irelandto Grace\Grisel Hays
Emigration[2] 1726 Emigrated to America
Death? 1741 Augusta County, Virginia

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Related

Notebook. Old Augusta Campbells
Analysis. The father of John Campbell (205)
Carol Mitchell Genforum Sep 2002
Letter from Gov. David Campbell, 1851
John Campbell's in Chalkley's Chronicles#Known Johns
Draper, 1881
Family Tree
Known John Campbells in Old Augusta



Overview

John Campbell (205) is considered to be the immigrant Patriarch of a line of Campbells that settled first in Old Chester Pennsylvania, perhaps as early as 1726, and who moved west and south into the Valley of Virginia by 1742. The family is often connected by genealogists to the Campbell's of Argyll, Scotland, but the nature of the connection, if any, is obscure. There is also a view that the family line emigrated from Scotland to north Ireland around 1600. Different genealogists place them in different parts of North Ireland, both east and west of Londonderry. Some place the line at the Drumabold townland, Kilmacrenan, Donegal. The family oral history of the Drumabold Campbells identifies two waves of immigration, one in the first part of the 18th century, and one to the first part of the 19th century. IN this view it is the first wave that came to settle in the Valley of Virginia. These stories may be simply apocryphal, and whether they have any bearing on the line of John Campbell (205), the Patriarch, is not clear. In any case, references to the line of the Argyll Campbells, Drumabold Campbells, etc. should be taken with a grain of salt. The following is one interpretation of the lineage.

The American branch of this Campbell family, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1726 before relocating to Augusta County by 1738, claim descent from the Campbell's of Inveraray, Argyll, Scotland (Source:Draper, 1881). This corresponds to the line of descent for the Drumaboden Campbells, as given in Source:Campbell, 1925.  The later source does not make mention of the children of Duncan Campbell, and further work is needed to confirm this connection.  However, the marriage of a Duncan Campbell in Kilmacrenan in 1652 has good correspondance with both Campbell, 1925, and with the dates for the first generation of the Campbells who settled in Lancaster and Augusta 1726 and 1738.  Further work is needed to confirm these relations.
Enlarge
The American branch of this Campbell family, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1726 before relocating to Augusta County by 1738, claim descent from the Campbell's of Inveraray, Argyll, Scotland (Source:Draper, 1881). This corresponds to the line of descent for the Drumaboden Campbells, as given in Source:Campbell, 1925. The later source does not make mention of the children of Duncan Campbell, and further work is needed to confirm this connection. However, the marriage of a Duncan Campbell in Kilmacrenan in 1652 has good correspondance with both Campbell, 1925, and with the dates for the first generation of the Campbells who settled in Lancaster and Augusta 1726 and 1738. Further work is needed to confirm these relations.


According to Source:Draper, 1881:

The Campbell family....were originally from Inverary, Argyllshire, connected with the famous Campbell clans of the Highlands of Scotland; and emigrated to Ireland near the close of the reign of Queen Elizabeth—about the year 1600. The northern portion of Ireland received, at that period, large accessions of Scotch Protestants, who proved valuable and useful citizens. Here the Campbells continued to live for several generations, until at length John Campbell, with a family of ten or twelve children, removed to America in 1726, and settled first in Donegal, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where we find one of his sons, Patrick Campbell, born in 1690, serving as a constable in 1729. About 1730, John Campbell, with three of his sons, Patrick among them, removed from Pennsylvania to what was then a part of Orange, now Augusta County, in the rich valley of Virginia.[4]

Another authority assigns 1738 as the time of this migration.[5] [6]

Among the children of Patrick Campbell, who thus early settled in Western Virginia, was Person:Charles Campbell (31), who seems to have been born in Ireland before the removal of the family to the New World. He became a prominent and efficient pioneer of the Augusta Valley. He early married a Miss Buchanan, whose father, John Buchanan, Sr., had figured in the wars of Scotland; and from this union sprang William Campbell, who subsequently led the Scotch-Irish patriots of the Holston Valley against Ferguson at King's Mountain.

In anycase, by 1742 the Family of John (205) was well established in Beverley Manor, Augusta, Virginia.

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See: Preliminary Family Tree of the Campbells of Augusta County for discussion. Note that the lineage as currently laid out on WeRelate does not conform well to Drapers discussion given above. Draper may be in error, or perhaps the family relationships currently inplace on WeRelate need to be revised.
References
  1. Joseph A. Waddell. Annuals of Augusta County, Virginia 1726-1871, pg. 147.
  2. Ovvan D. Edmondson, editior - 4747 Westminster Circle, Eagan, MN 55122-2756. Edmondson Family Association Bulletin, Oct. - Dec., 1998, pg. 6.
  3. John Campbell is variously described as coming from Drumboden or Drumaboden, Kilmachrenan or Kilmacrenan, Donegal, Ireland. Drumaboden is a townland in Derry. Kilmacrenan is a nearby village. The village may or may not be in the townland. "Drumboden" could also refer to an estate name, in or near Kilmacrenan. See:Drumaboden Townland When viewed July 5 2011 this page provided a map showing the location of Drumaboden Townland as immediately northeast of Kilmacrenan. This was the only match obtained for a Google search of "Drumaboden Townland"
  4. MS. statements of Gov. David Campbell; Foote's Sketches 0f Virginia, second series, pp. 114, 117; Rupp's History of Lancaster County, Pa., 185; Mombcrt's Lancaster. See also [[Transcript:Letter from Gov. David Campbell, 1851|]]
  5. R. A. Brock, Esq., in Richmond Standard, July 10th, 1880.
  6. The difference in date of immigration is significant in terms of understanding the family connections of the various Campbells in the area. An early 1730's migration date to the Valley of Virginia might imply a connection to the Campbells who intermarried with the extended family of Person:Michael Woods (1). This family is known to have come from Cumberland County, PA, through the Valley of Virginia, about 1733, and is present on the east side of the Blue Ridge (Albemarle County, Woods Gap) by 1734. On the otherhand, if the migration date was 1738, then the family of John Campbell (205), would most likely not be connected to the Campbells who married into the Wood family. Rather, this migration date might imply a connection to the Wigton Walker line who are believed to have come from the Chester, PA/Cecil County/MD area about that date, to settle on Borden's Grant. John Campbell, a soninlaw of John Walker II and Katherine Rutherford of the Wigton Walker line, is also said to be connected to the Argyll line of Campbells. Source:White, 1902. Perhaps signficantly, the Wigton Walkers are said to have immigrated from Ireland in 1726.