Person:John Barton (2)

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John Barton
m. 5 Nov 1810
  1. John Barton1811 - 1897
  2. Jane Barton1814 -
  3. Elizabeth Barton1817 -
  4. Sarah Barton1820 -
  5. Josiah Barton1822 -
  6. Alice Barton1825 -
  7. Robert Barton1842 -
m. 25 Oct 1835
  1. Alice Barton1837 - 1902
  2. Elizabeth Barton1839 - 1923
  3. Jane Ann Barton1841 - 1847
  4. Peter Barton1843 - 1843
  5. Margaret Barton1845 - 1895
  6. John Barton1847 - 1882
  7. Peter Barton1850 - 1924
  8. Daughter Barton1852 - 1852
m. 24 Jul 1859
  1. Jane Barton1860 - 1863
  2. Sarah Barton1862 - 1946
  3. Jane Ellen Barton1865 - 1936
  4. Joseph Thomas Barton1868 - 1955
  5. John William Edward Barton1870 - 1942
  6. Mr Barton1874 - 1874
Facts and Events
Name John Barton
Gender Male
Birth? 11 Sep 1811 Winstanley, Lancashire, England
Christening? 6 Oct 1811 Upholland, Lancashire, England
Marriage 25 Oct 1835 Wigan, Lancashire, Englandto Catherine Cuerden
Marriage 24 Jul 1859 Pemberton, Lancashire, Englandto Elizabeth Ann Walley
Death? 27 Feb 1897 Kaysville, Davis, Utah, USA
Burial[1] 4 Mar 1897 Kaysville Cemetery, Kaysville, Davis, Utah, USA
Other? Lot 7 Cemetery Description

BEP JOHN BARTON & ELIZABETH WALEY Your Great Great Great Grandfather, John Barton was born in Winstanley, Lancashire, England, September 11, 1811.

He was self educated and worked in the coal mines with his mother from the time he was nine years old until he left to come to America.

One night when he was coming home from the coal mines he heard two missionaries preaching on the street corner. They said they would be having a meeting the following night. He went with his first wife and they both were baptized.

When his first wife died, John later married great great grandmother, Elizabeth Walley. Elizabeth had joined the church before they got married. They left to come to Utah May 30, 1863. They sailed from Liverpool and spent ten weeks and three days on the ship. They arrived in New York and were put into cattle cars with straw in the bottom and came to St. Joseph, Mo. There they were met by men with ox teams and wagons. Anyone who wanted to buy a team and wagon could do so, so John bought one as his wife and children were very sick and had been all the way. Measles had broken out on board the ship and twenty-eight of the children died from them. When they arrived at Council Bluffs there were so many sick that they decided to camp for a few days and that night little Jane died. John went to the store and got a box. Elizabeth tore up a sheet to line the box and put Jane in it. Then John and one of his sons took her up on the bluffs and buried her. They then continued on their journey.

While they were camped at Fort Bridger one night, some Indians stole their cattle. So John and Elizabeth�s family had to double up with one of the other families. John walked the rest of the way to Salt Lake. They arrived October 10, 1863 after four months and eleven days.

Elizabeth was a very fine seamstress and took in a lot of sewing to do along with her other work of raising a family.

Elizabeth and John were sealed together for eternity in the Endowment House on March 4, 1864

References
  1. GPS Coordinates.

    41.04497 / -111.92733