Person:John, Count of Angoulême (1)

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Jean d'Orléans, comte d'Angoulême
b.1399
Facts and Events
Name Jean d'Orléans, comte d'Angoulême
Gender Male
Birth[1] 1399
Alt Birth[2] 26 Jun 1404
Marriage Contract 31 Aug 1449 to Marguerite de Rohan
Death[1][2] 30 Apr 1467 Cognac, Charente, France


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

John of Orléans, Count of Angoulême and of Périgord, 26 June 1399 – 30 April 1467, younger son of Louis I, Duke of Orléans, and Valentina Visconti, and a grandson of Charles V of France. He was the younger brother of the noted poet, Charles, Duke of Orléans, and grandfather of Francis I of France.

John was taken hostage by the English in 1412, and not released until 1444. In 1415 he was joined by his older brother Charles, with whom he shared an interest in literature. He had to sell part of his estates to pay for his ransom, but still collected many books. After that, he fought under the orders of his illegitimate half-brother, Dunois, driving the English out of Guyenne in 1451.

On 31 August 1449, he married Marguerite de Rohan, daughter of Alain IX of Rohan and Marguerite of Brittany. They had three children:

  • Louis (1455–1458)
  • Charles (1459–1496)
  • Joan (1462–1520), who married Charles François de Coetivy, count de Taillebourg.

He also had an illegitimate son, Jean de Valois, bastard of Angoulême, who was legitimised in 1458.

"Good Count John" died in 1467. He is buried in the Cathedral of Angoulême.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at John, Count of Angoulême. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 John, Count of Angoulême, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Anselme (de Sainte-Marie). Histoire généalogique de la maison royale de France, des pairs et grands officiers de la Couronne. (Paris: la Compagnie des Libraires, 1726-1733), 1:209.