Person:James Clark (116)

Watchers
m. 28 Dec 1782
  1. Gilbert Clark1791 - 1854
  2. Elizabeth Jane Clarkabt 1794 - 1856
  3. David Clarkabt 1795 - abt 1830
  4. Maj. John Clarkabt 1797 -
  5. James Henry Clark1797 - abt 1850
  6. James Clark1799 - 1838
  7. Penelope Clarkabt 1803 - abt 1840
  8. Sarah Ann Clark1809 - aft 1880
  9. Benjamin Clark, Jr.abt 1810 -
m. 15 Jul 1829
  1. Sarah Duty Clark1832 - 1846
  2. Dr. Pat Benjamin Clark1835 - 1921
  3. Capt. James Clark1838 - 1910
Facts and Events
Name[1] James Clark
Gender Male
Birth[2] 1799 Sumner County, Tennessee
Marriage 15 Jul 1829 near mouth of Mill Creek, Red River County, Texas(her 2nd husband; 5 children)
to Isabella Hadden Hopkins
Death[3][2] 2 May 1838 Clarksville, Red River County, Texas(following a throat ailment)
Burial[2][4] Clarksville Cemetery, Clarksville, Red River, Texas, United States
References
  1. Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. xiii.

    In Dec 1829, he platted the town of Clarksville.

  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Handbook of Texas Online, "Clark, James".

    On 10 Dec 1830, he was appointed postmaster for Miller County, Arkansas -- but on 31 Dec 1830, he took an oath to the government of Mexico to register for a land grant under authority of Arthur Wavell's colonization contract. (This typifies the confusion of jurisdictions in the region at this time.) In 1831, he was appointed Justice of the Peace for Miller County. In 1832, he served as deputy County Clerk after Jonesboro became the Miller County seat. In 1833, he was elected from Miller County to the Arkansas Territorial Legislative Council. In Dec 1835, on the outbreak of the revolution, he led a deputation of Red River area settlers to Nacogdoches. In Apr 1836, he was a member of a volunteer ranger expedition sent to gather information about Indian movements near the Red River settlements. In October, the company was discharged and Clark returned home.

  3. Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. xiv.

    In 1827-33, he served from Miller County in the House of Representatives in the 5th & 7th Territorial General Assemblies, and in the Council for the 8th Territorial General Assembly. [See also Source #9]

  4. Grave marker, Clarksville Cemetery, Clarksville, Red River County, Texas.
  5.   Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), pp. 6-7.

    He graduated from the University of Virginia at age 16 (in 1815?). From about 1818 to 1824, he manufactured salt at the salt licks on Little River in Hempstead County, Arkansas, and visited the Red River district on salt-trading expeditions to the Indians. Then the author says Clark (his grandfather) moved to Jonesboro in order to supply salt and food (on a contract from Gen. Andrew Jackson) to the Choctaw and Chickasaw, who were being removed to the west -- but he seems to be a little confused regarding the timeline of the Indian Removal. The Choctaw removal actually did not occur until 1831, the Seminole in 1832, the Creek in 1834, the Chickasaw in 1837, and the Cherokee in 1838.

  6.   Arkansas Secretary of State. Historical Report of the Secretary of State, 1998. (Little Rock: Arkansas Secretary of State, 1998), p. 631.

    From 1821 to 1823, he served as Clerk of Miller County.

  7.   Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), pp. xiii-xiv.

    In 1823, he moved from Arkansas to the present site of Clarksville, where there was a spring near Delaware Creek. Henry Stout and Gabriel Martin already were there. "He had certificates of land under the Mexican Republic, but traded them to Henry Stout, and the land later was patented under Stout's name, though the starting of the town was due to the initiative of James Clark, and it was properly named in his honor." [See also Source #8]

  8.   Handbook of Texas Online, "Stout, Henry B.".
  9.   Arkansas Secretary of State. Historical Report of the Secretary of State, 1998. (Little Rock: Arkansas Secretary of State, 1998), pp. 214-15.
  10.   Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. 44.

    On 1 Feb 1838, the Red River County Board of Land Commissioners awarded Clark 4,605 acres as his first-class headright grant. He later received another 320 acres from the Texas secretary of war as his bounty grant for serving three months in the army.

  11.   Clark, Pat B. The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County. (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort & Co., 1937), p. 81.

    On 18 Oct 1830, he signed a petition to the county court of Miller County for a "passable road" from Davis's Landing to the courthouse at Jonesboro.