Person:Francis Yockey (1)

Francis Parker Yockey
b.18 September 1917 Chicago
d.17 June 1960 San Francisco
m. 1911
  1. Alyce L. Spurlock1915 - 2011
  2. Francis Parker Yockey1917 - 1960
Facts and Events
Name[1] Francis Parker Yockey
Alt Name[1] Ulick Varange
Alt Name[2] Francis P. Yockey
Alt Name[4] Richard Allen
Gender Male
Residence[4] 1917-c.1932 Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States
Birth[1][2] 18 September 1917 Chicago
Degree[1] 1941 University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, St. Joseph, Indiana, United States
Death[1][2] 17 June 1960 San Francisco


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Francis Parker Yockey (September 18, 1917 – June 16, 1960) was an American attorney, political philosopher and polemicist best known for his neo-Spenglerian book 'Imperium: The Philosophy of History and Politics', published under the pen name Ulick Varange in 1948. This 160,000-word book argues for a culture-based, totalitarian path for the preservation of Western culture.

Yockey actively supported many far-right causes around the world and remains one of the seminal influences of many White nationalist and New Right movements. Although he was a devotee of Oswald Spengler (who was critical of the Nazis), Yockey was a passionate proponent of anti-Semitism, and expressed a reverence for German National Socialism, and a general affinity for fascist causes. Yockey contacted or worked with the Nazi aligned German-American Bund and the National German-American Alliance. After the defeat of the Axis in the Second World War, Yockey became even more active in neo-Fascist causes.

As the Soviet Union switched to supporting Arab nationalists against Israel, Yockey believed that an alliance between the USSR and the far-right could be advanced to weaken the strategic position of the United States, which he believed was an engine of liberalism, controlled by Zionist Jews. Yockey also met Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser, and wrote anti-Zionist propaganda on behalf of the Egyptian government, seeing the pan-Arab nationalist movement as another ally to challenge "the Jewish-American power." While in prison for falsified passports, he was visited by Willis Carto, who ultimately became the chief advocate and publisher of Yockey's writings.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Francis Parker Yockey. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Varange, Ulick. Varange, Ulick. Imperium, Author Biography, 1962, Secondary quality.

    In hand is a photocopy of the title page and author biography for the book in question, the biography either appearing on the back cover or on a flyleaf page at the back of the book. This also includes a photograph of the author.

  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Francis Parker Yockey, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  3.   Francis P. Yockey, in California, United States. Death Index, 1940-1997, Secondary quality.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Coogan, Kevin. Dreamer of the Day. (Brooklyn, New York, United States: Autonomedia), 50,51, 1999, Secondary quality.

    "For the first 15 years of his life Yockey lived in Chicago...."