Person:Euphrosyne of Kiev (1)

Helena Evfrosinia Mstislawna , of Kiev
Facts and Events
Name Helena Evfrosinia Mstislawna , of Kiev
Alt Name Rurik
Gender Female
Birth[1] abt 1130 Kiev, Kiev Oblast, Ukraine
Death[1] abt 1193 İstanbul, Turkey
Ancestral File Number B1BL-13
Burial? Szekesfehervar, Fejer, Hungary


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Euphrosyne of Kiev (Euphrosine of Novgorod) (c. 1130 – c. 1193) was Queen consort of Hungary.

Euphrosyne was the first daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and his second wife, Ljubava Saviditsch. In 1146, Euphrosyne married King Géza II of Hungary, who had come of age shortly before.

During her husband's reign Euphrosyne did not intervene in the politics of the kingdom, but after his death on 31 May 1162, her influence strengthened over their son, King Stephen III. The young king had to struggle against his uncles Ladislaus and Stephen to save his throne, and Euphrosyne took an active part in the struggles. She persuaded King Vladislaus II of Bohemia to give military assistance to her son against the invasion of the Emperor Manuel I Komnenos.

Euphrosyne's favourite son was the youngest, Duke Géza of Hungary. When King Stephen III died on 4 March 1172, she was planning to ensure his succession against her older son, Béla, who had been living in the court of the Emperor Manuel I Komnenos. However, Béla came back, and he was crowned on 13 January 1173, although the Archbishop Lukács of Esztergom denied his coronation. Shortly after, King Béla III arrested his brother, which increased the tension between Euphrosyne and her son. Duke Géza soon managed to escape, probably with Euphrosyne's help, but in 1177 he was again arrested.

In 1186, Euphrosyne tried to release her younger son again, but she failed. King Béla III ordered the arrest of Euphrosyne and kept her confined in the fortress of Barancs (Serbian: Braničevo). Shortly after, Euphrosyne was set free, but she was obliged to leave the kingdom for Constantinople. From Constantinople she moved to Jerusalem where she lived as a nun in the convent of the Hospitallers, and then in the Basilian monastery of Saint Sabbas.

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Euphrosyne of Kiev, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   Euphrosine of Novgorod, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.