Person:Arthur Campbell (7)

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Name Col. Arthur Campbell
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From: Peyton, J. Lewis. 1882. History of Augusta County, Virginia. Staunton, Va. : Samuel M. Yost & son. Google Books

COL. ARTHUR CAMPBELL. Arthur Campbell was born in Augusta County in 1742. When fifteen years old, he volunteered as a militiaman, to perform duty in protecting the frontier from incursions of the Indians. He was stationed in a fort on the Cowpasture river, near where the road crosses leading from Staunton to the Warm Springs. While engaged in this service, he was captured by the Indians, who loaded him with their packs, and marched seven days into the forests with his captors, who were from Lakes Erie and Michigan, and were on their return. Campbell, at the end of seven days, was so exhausted that he was unable to travel, and was treated by the Indians with great severity. An old chief, taking compassion on him, protected him from further injury, and on reaching the Lakes adopted Campbell, in whose family the young man remained during his three years' captivity. During this time, Campbell made himself familiar with the Indian language their manners and customs, and soon acquired the confidence of the old chief, who took him on all his hunting excursions. During these they rambled over Michigan and the northern parts of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. In 1749, a British force marched towards the Upper Lakes, of which the Indians were informed by their scouts. Campbell formed the bold resolution of escaping to this force. While out on one of their hunting excursions, Campbell left the Indians, and after a fortnight's tramp through the pathless wilds reached the British. The British commander was much interested in Campbell's account of his captivity and escape, and with his intelligence, and engaged him to pilot the army, which he did with success. Shortly after he returned to Augusta, after an absence of more than three years. For his services in piloting the army he received a grant of 1,000 acres of land near Louisville, Kentucky. In 1772, his father, David Campbell, and family, removed to the " Royal Oak," on Holstein river, and in 1776, Arthur Campbell was appointed major in the Fincastle militia, and elected to the General Assembly. He was also a member of the convention for forming the Constitution. When Washington county was formed he was commissioned colonel commandant, and during the time he was in commission commanded several expeditions, particularly that against the Cherokees. He was tall, of a dignified air, an extensive reader and good talker. He married a sister of Gen. William Campbell, and left issue at his death, in 1816, in Knox county, Kentucky.

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From: Tyler, Lyon Gardiner. 1915. Encyclopedia of Virginia biography, under the editorial supervision of Lyon Gardiner Tyler. New York: Lewis historical Pub. Co. Google Books

Campbell, Arthur, born in Augusta coun- tj, Virginia, November 3, 1743. When fourteen years old, he volunteered to aid in protecting the frontier against the Indians. He was stationed in a fort on the Cowpasture river, near where the road crosses leading from Staunton to the Warm Springs. He was captured by the Indians, who loaded him \\ ith their packs, and marched him into the forests. At the end of seven days, he was unable to travel, and was treated by the Indians with great severity. An old chief, taking compassion on him, protected him from further injury, and on reaching the lakes adopted him, and the young man remained with him during his three years' captivity. Campbell made himself familiar with the Indian language, manners and customs, and gained the confidence of the old chief, who took him on all his hunting excursions over Michigan and the northern parts of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. In 1759, a British force marched towards the Upper Lakes, and Campbell determined to escape. While out hunting, he left the Indians, and after a fortnight's tramp, reached the British. The British commander was much interested in Campbell's account of his captivity and escape, and engaged him to pilot the army, which he did with success. Shortly after, he returned to Augusta, after an absence of more than three years. For his services in piloting the army he received a grant of one thousand acres of land near Louisville, Kentucky. In 1769, his father and family removed to the "Royal Oak," on Holstein river, and in 1776, Arthur Campbell was appointed major in the Fincastle militia, and elected to the general assembly. He was a member of the convention for framing the constitution. When Washington county was formed, he was commissioned colonel, and commanded several expeditions, particularly that against the Cherokees. In 1785 he took part in a plan of separating the county of Washington from Virginia and uniting it with the proposed commonwealth of Frankland, constituting the western part of North Carolina, whereupon the general assembly passed an act drawn by John Tyler denouncing any attempt of this kind as high treason. He was tall, with a dignified air, an extensive reader, and a good talker. He married a sister of Gen. William Campbell, and left issue at his death, at Middleborough, Kentucky, August 8, 1811.



DOB1742
POBAugusta Co VA
DODAugust 8, 1811
PODMiddlesboro KY
SpouseMargaret Campbell
FatherDavid Campbell
Mother
Children


1757 served in F&I, assigned to Dickerson's Fort on Cowpasture River in Bath County, Va. Captured by Indians, and held captive for three years in Ohio Country, until he escaped .

1760 attended Walnut Academy at Lexington, Virginia. XXX married his cousin, Margaret Campbell, XXXX Settled at Royal Oak sixty miles west of Ingles River, on the middle fork of the Holston River.

Major in the Augusta County militia

Delegate from Fincastle County, Virginia. 1805 left Royal Oak to Yellow Creek (Middlesboro) Kentucky. Died August 8, 1811, at the age of seventy-three and was buried in a grave plot called "Gideon's Tenements" which was near his home.