Person:Antiochus IV Epiphanes (1)

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Antiochus IV Epiphanes
b.abt 0215 BC
d.0164 BC
Facts and Events
Name Antiochus IV Epiphanes
Gender Male
Death[1] 0164 BC
Birth[1] abt 0215 BC


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Antiochus IV Epiphanes (; , Antíochos Epiphanḗs, "God Manifest";[1] c. 215 BC – 164 BC) was a Greek king of the Seleucid Empire from 175 BC until his death in 164 BC. He was a son of King Antiochus III the Great. His original name was Mithradates (alternative form Mithridates); he assumed the name Antiochus after he ascended the throne.

Notable events during the reign of Antiochus IV include his near-conquest of Egypt, which led to a confrontation that became an origin of the metaphorical phrase, "line in the sand" (see below), and the rebellion of the Jewish Maccabees.

Antiochus was the first Seleucid king to use divine epithets on coins, perhaps inspired by Bactrian Hellenistic kings who had earlier done so, or else building on the ruler cult that his father Antiochus the Great had codified within the Seleucid Empire. These epithets included Θεὸς Ἐπιφανής 'manifest god', and, after his defeat of Egypt, Νικηφόρος 'bringer of victory'. However, Antiochus also tried to interact with common people, by appearing in the public bath houses and applying for municipal offices, and his often eccentric behavior and capricious actions led some of his contemporaries to call him Epimanes ("The Mad One"), a word play on his title Epiphanes.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original content was at Antiochus IV Epiphanes. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with WeRelate, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Antiochus IV Epiphanes, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).